Click the link below to view the guide.

Congregational Guide For June 28, 2020 Proper 8 2020

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Click the link below to view the congregational guide

Congregational Guide For The Third Sunday After Pentecost

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The Friday Reflection
June 19, 2020
Bishop David Rice

Friday Reflection, June 19th

We are thrilled to announce that Constance and Dain Perry will be hosting a conversation on racism and white privilege. Our conversation will be framed by the book, “Waking Up White” I by Debby Irving. It is available on Amazon, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 1st: Ground rules/norms & Section 1
July 8th: Sections 2 & 3
July 15th: Sections 4 & 5
July 22nd: Sections 6 & 7
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9
Please RSVP to Canon Anna at canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org to receive the Zoom link.

  HAPPENING TODAY
Juneteenth (sometimes called Freedom Day or Jubilee Day) commemorates the liberation of African-Americans from slavery in the United States. While the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves was issued in January 1, 1863, it was only first read to enslaved African-Americans in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865 at the Civil War’s end. The date has been celebrated annually since that time in a number of ways, including church services, picnics, and cultural festivals. Today in 47 of our 50 states Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance. This year at St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, we will be marking Juneteenth by a special online service on June 19. The preacher will be Pastor Curtis Smith, the Chapter Director of Faith in the Valley for San Joaquin. The service will be streamed at 12noon via St. Paul’s Facebook page and YouTube, but if you miss it at noon it will remain on both platforms for future viewing.  While Juneteenth celebrates specifically the freedom from slavery of African-Americans, it is also part of the larger American narrative as we continue to struggle with and live into our founding principle that all people are created equal and that we are endowed with “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Join us in celebration and remembrance.

 Little Free Libraries
 Do you have a Little Free Library at your parish? One way you can offer Racial Reconciliation resources to your community is to add BIPOC* books to your free little libraries! Have a fundraiser if you need, and stock up!
For some book ideas, check out this list.
*BIPOC stands for Black, Indigenous, People of Color.

The Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE), whose members are of African descent, has fought to eradicate racism for over 200 years by encouraging the involvement of Black people in the total life of the Episcopal Church- on every level and in every way – stewardship, evangelism, education, leadership, governance and politics. We have stridently worked to dismantle power structures within the church and in society that have gone askew. Today as members of African descent in the Episcopal Church, we are deeply hurt, gravely offended and morally wounded by the unconscionable acts and senseless and horrific killings in the first half of 2020 of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery in addition to the many other Black and Brown people who have been unjustly victimized and murdered by the police; those who are charged with protecting, helping and serving our communities. It has been a collective awakening for us, the Church and society as a whole.

Download the statement from our friends in Northern California here.

DACA stands! (but only for now….)
Yesterday the Supreme Court, with a slim 5/4 majority, ruled that the Trump Administration could not immediately shut down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program which grants protected status for children brought to the US without immigration authorization. The program was implemented in 2012, and includes strict provisions including age of arrival, continuous residence, school attendance, diploma or degree, no felony offenses, and not a threat to national security.
At present, there are about 800,000 DACA recipients in the US. Census data (American Community Survey) show the ways in which DACA recipients have contributed to their families, communities, and the nation’s economy. (https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/immigration/news/2019/09/05/474177/know-daca-recipients-united-states/)
Thursday’s decision was based on the procedural errors by which the Trump Administration sought to end DACA – not the validity of DACA itself. As such, a legislative solution, including development of a path to citizenship, must now happen if DACA is to be preserved. But for now, the threat of deportation has been lifted from nearly 1 million DACA recipients who call this country “home.”
Deacon Nancy Key and Deacon Tom Hampson,
Co-Chairs, Immigration Commission

Looking for a New Book? Check Out Your Local Library.
Instead of buying your own copy, check out your local library for your next read. Libraries are valuable community centers, and chances are you’ll only read the book once – no need to purchase every copy for yourself! If you like using e-readers, the Libby app allows you to borrow books from the library digitally.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Pride Talk – Sexuality and Gender Identity Diversity
June 24 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Women, Truth and Reconciliation Task Force Survey

Invitation to participate in survey about sexual misconduct in The Episcopal Church
Dear People of God in the Episcopal Church:
In early 2018, we issued a call for The Episcopal Church to come to a fuller understanding of how it has handled or mishandled cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse through the years. That work began to take shape at General Convention 2018 when the House of Deputies Special Committee on Sexual Harassment and Exploitation submitted more than twenty resolutions and the House of Bishops held a Liturgy of Listening to lament and confess the church’s role in harassment, exploitation and abuse.
Since General Convention, several task forces have been hard at work carrying out the resolutions of convention that address gender-based discrimination and violence. Today we are asking you to assist one of those groups-the Task Force on Women, Truth and Reconciliation-by taking an online survey designed to assess patterns of church-based harassment and abuse and the effect that it has on victims. Please take the survey online by July 1, 2020.

Spam Emails!

   
Hi EDSJ!
Deacon Angela here. It looks like many of you have been receiving spam emails that appear to be from us. They are not, and since they don’t come from our email, there is unfortunately little we can do to stop it.
Things to look for in scam emails:
Our emails all end in diosanjoaquin.org. Hacked emails are not from our server.
The Bishops title simply says: Rev. David Rice. This is an incorrect title.
We ask you for gift cards of any sort. We will NEVER do that in an email.
We mention that is discreet. Again, that is a key word that this is likely fake.
We mention that we are in a prayer meeting. Well that doesn’t sounds like our type of language.
Watch out, please!
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
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The Friday Reflection
June 12, 2020
The Rev. John Shumaker

In Holy Baptism we are born-again of water and the Holy Spirit. God freely gives us that gift of the new birth, and not on any merit of our own. We are Sealed by the Holy Spirit, and marked as Christ’s own forever. We belong to Jesus.
Our response is to accept the grace that God has given to us, and in turn give ourselves to God as He has freely given Himself to us.
When we love someone, we get involved with them in many ways
….without communication, there is no relationship,
….without relationship, there is no love,
….without love, there is no trust.
As Christians, our relationship with Jesus Christ is the foundation of everything that we are, everything that we do, and everything that we hope to be.
Through the Waters of Regeneration in Holy Baptism, a relationship with God has begun, and it’s up to each one of us to do something about it.
You’ve probably heard someone say from time to time that in the church that it is the job of the ministers to minister, and the congregation to congregate.
….But who are the ministers of the Church?
The Book of Common Prayer teaches us that “the ministers of the Church are lay persons, bishops, priests, and deacons.”             (Catechism in The Book of Common Prayer, page 855)
As Christians we are all ministers of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Each one of us have our own gifts that God has given to us within the Body of Christ.
Someone once stated that “the mark of a disciple and the marks of a leader are very nearly identical.”
Holy Baptism is the beginning of where we fit in, in our relationship within The Body of Christ…..and it is a daily call to our dying and rising with Christ, and utilizing the gifts that God has given to us.
“The gifts He gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until all of us come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to maturity, to the measure of the full stature in Christ.”   (Ephesians 4:11-23 NRSV)
Peter states “I exhort the presbyters among you to tend the flock of God that is in our charge, exercising the oversight, not under compulsion but willingly as God would have you do it – not for sordid gain but eagerly. Do not lord it over those in your charge, but be examples to the flock.” (I Peter 1-3 NRSV)
Discipleship, and leadership, come from the same root:   Jesus Christ, and our daily commitment to Him.

Reopening Protocols for EDSJ
June 12, 2020
Dear Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
From the early beginnings of this horrific pandemic, I have been joined by diocesan staff, leaders and clergy colleagues in expressing the ways in which our responses amid this crisis speak of who we are and to WHOM we belong. We have consistently identified that this is yet another opportunity to grow deeper into the Beloved Community we are Called to be… This has been no more evident than the urging to take care of one another (the other) by taking care of ourselves. This other-self care has and continues to involve sheltering-in-place, wearing masks
and gloves and the like. We have been clear that our identity, our very reason to be, requires that we put public health over economics and theological-communal responsibility over individual rights. We have been clear that the need to reflect God in the Way of Love could not be more necessary than in our present contexts and circumstances. And we have been clear the Jesus Movement must inform what we do and how we do it during these days of COVID-19.
As we move closer to reopening, the aforementioned expression of identity and reflection of faith must not diminish. The guidelines before us are practical measures to ensure (to the extent we can) continued safety, health and wellness for all. When reopening occurs, we urge you to adhere to the guidelines and continue to frame them with words of faith, hope and love. We also encourage you to exercise caution, care and patience as we move into becoming church in yet
another way.
I wish to thank the contributors of our Diocesan Guidelines.
Participants on the Working Group were:
Canon Anna Carmichael (Dio Staff)
Ms. Barbara Vassell, Communicable Disease Manager, Stanislaus County Public Health
(Modesto)
Rev’d Luis Rodriguez (Bakersfield)
Rev’d Peter Ackerman (Lodi)
Rev’d Jim McDonald (Fresno)
Bishop David Rice (Dio Staff)
Blessings,
The Rt. Rev. David C. Rice
Where we are now:
EDSJ-Stage 1: Shelter In Place
O Virtual worship services

o Allow for no more than 3 people in the same space for filming of virtual worship; wearing of masks and 6ft of social distancing required

O All meetings/gatherings held virtually
O No in-person pastoral visits
O Limit feeding ministries to those which can follow safe protocols determined by health department.

To see the protocols for reopening, download the document below.
The PowerPoint presentation, as well as all these materials, will be available on the website by the end of day, June 12th.

“Dear God, let us not get so caught up in the fear and the chaos that we ignore the work we must do to meet the need. Turn our hearts toward the work we can do to help those kept in the shadows.  We may not be able to physically witness the situation, however, we can act.” — From Nancy Fitzgerald’s opening article

Check Your Car’s Tire Pressure

Properly inflated tires improve the car’s gas mileage. This will not only decrease your carbon emission but also save you money.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary Devotional, Bilingual
June 12 | 6:30 PM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Diversity of Bishops for a Diverse Church
June 17 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Sexuality and Gender Identity Diversity
June 24 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

TODAY!
Join Dcn. Nelson for the next devotional. This month will be focused on La Guadalupana: Her Story, Our Prayer. This is a bilingual event, live on Facebook.
Please join us, Friday, June 12th at 6:30 pm.

Northern California Vivian Traylor Chapter of UBE Statement on the Racism in the Church and a Call for Action

The Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE), whose members are of African descent, has fought to eradicate racism for over 200 years by encouraging the involvement of Black people in the total life of the Episcopal Church- on every level and in every way – stewardship, evangelism, education, leadership, governance and politics. We have stridently worked to dismantle power structures within the church and in society that have gone askew. Today as members of African descent in the Episcopal Church, we are deeply hurt, gravely offended and morally wounded by the unconscionable acts and senseless and horrific killings in the first half of 2020 of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery in addition to the many other Black and Brown people who have been unjustly victimized and murdered by the police; those who are charged with protecting, helping and serving our communities. It has been a collective awakening for us, the Church and society as a whole.

Download the statement from our friends in Northern California here.

Spam Emails!

   
Hi EDSJ!
Deacon Angela here. It looks like many of you have been receiving spam emails that appear to be from us. They are not, and since they don’t come from our email, there is unfortunately little we can do to stop it.
Things to look for in scam emails:
Our emails all end in diosanjoaquin.org. Hacked emails are not from our server.
The Bishops title simply says: Rev. David Rice. This is an incorrect title.
We ask you for gift cards of any sort. We will NEVER do that in an email.
We mention that is discreet. Again, that is a key word that this is likely fake.
We mention that we are in a prayer meeting. Well that doesn’t sounds like our type of language. ��
Watch out, please!
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

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Click the link below to view the congregational guide,

Trinity Sunday 2020 Congregational Guide

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Click the link below to view the pastoral letter

Pastoral Letter from Bishop David June 2, 2020

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The Friday Reflection
June 5, 2020
The Rev. Nick Lorenzetti

Our theme for this year’s articles in Friday Reflections begs the question: “What does Christian leadership look like during a crisis, such as a pandemic?” I believe there is truth to the claim by many who write about leadership that the call to leadership is often greatest in a crisis. Some would say that as goes the leadership, so goes the organization, even in a community such as a church, where hopefully Christ’s ministry is shared by all. We who are leaders must be alert and recognize that in these days of COVID-19, we must not retreat into chaos, and must certainly not retreat. I believe we are called to the moment and to display the behaviors that will help our diocese and our parishes to not only survive, but also to thrive in the aftermath.
This pandemic is the second crisis through which I have been a leader. The first was 9/11. I lived 90 miles from Manhattan during the time, and many in my town worked in NYC, had family in NYC, lost family and friends who were in the Trade Center. I have often reflected on what leadership in that disaster looked like, and have pondered what worked and what seemed not to work. The example of first-responders, clergy and lay leaders from almost all religions, “ordinary” folk from all areas around the country, etc., in retrospect taught me a lot about what servant leadership looks like.
Many have never been in the situation where we now find ourselves in the world. For my own prayer and understanding, I have, from various authors, come up with my personal list of what might be called the right behaviors of all kinds of leaders during a most difficult circumstance. Permit me to share them with you.
First, the effective leader in time of crisis is able to embrace reality, but project positivity. When times are tough, these kinds of leaders exude hope and optimism. They do not deny the seriousness of the moment; they acknowledge the suffering and loss of fellow human beings. But at the same time, they remain persons of vision, and they are able to strike a balance between reality and an improved future. The key word in this behavior is “hope.”
Second, the effective leader steps up to the proverbial plate in a crisis. They can help others recognize what needs to be done and what should not be done. They recognize that in times of crisis circumstances are volatile, and that they must be ready to adjust, balance, compromise, and change strategies and approaches as circumstances dictate. They understand that in crises, there are no “one size fits all” strategies.
Thirdly, the effective leader works hard at communication and relationships with her/his constituents. They are available and in touch with those whom they lead. They “care” about how those whom they serve are faring. They provide vital information when and as it becomes available. They speak the truth (such as, masks are important), but they layer the truth in encouragement, offering a reminder of the grace of the Divine.
Fourth, the effective leader focuses on the concerns of others above self. Simply put, this type of leader is skilled in empathy, and they exude an attitude of “how can I help you?”
Finally, they set example; they never ask anything of others that they are not willing to do. They remain as visible as possible, even if only virtually.
My sisters and brothers, there’s nothing new here. But I offer the fruits of my own study, prayer and reflection. May God continue to guide, direct and inspire us through this time of trial. Blessings and Peace.
Nick+

Pastoral Letter from Bishop David
June 2, 2020
Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
Yesterday, we paused and remained silent as we joined with millions in a National Day of Mourning. The intention of the day was to remember and grieve over 107,000 people no longer with us in the US and over 371,000 worldwide. And we are painfully aware that those numbers continue to increase daily.
And so, we remember and we grieve.
We have remained consistent in EDSJ regarding our response to this horrific pandemic. We have identified that public health will always take priority over economics. We have acknowledged that communal and theological responsibility will always supersede individual rights. And we have named that the very best way we can ensure care of and for one another is by taking care of ourselves through adherence to protocols and precautions.
And so, we remember and we grieve.
Tired and weary and grieving we are. We have been engulfed by COVID-19.  It has redefined and refigured most aspects of our lives. It has taken life from us, both literally and figuratively. And as a result, we will never be the same.
And so, we remember and we grieve.

“Dear God, let us not get so caught up in the fear and the chaos that we ignore the work we must do to meet the need. Turn our hearts toward the work we can do to help those kept in the shadows.  We may not be able to physically witness the situation, however, we can act.” — From Nancy Fitzgerald’s opening article

Use Gray Water
Gray water is water that has been used but is not necessarily contaminated.  You can use dish washing water, hand washing water, and cooking water to water plants. There are even systems you can install now that allow you to make use of gray water more effectively.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Wear Orange
June 5
Information below
Commission on Ministry with Standing Committee – Discernment Conference
June 6 | 9:00 AM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 9 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Racial Reconciliation
June 10 | 6:30 PM
Mary Devotional, Bilingual
June 12 | 6:30 PM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Diversity of Bishops for a Diverse Church
June 17 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Sexuality and Gender Identity Diversity
June 24 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

Wear Orange is Friday, June 5. This 6th National Gun Violence Awareness Day, organized by Everytown and community partners across the country, honors both those killed by gun violence and those who have survived it. Everytown is holding virtual events across the country June 5-7 to raise awareness for gun violence prevention.
Visit the Wear Orange Weekend website for tools to promote the weekend on social media, to find a virtual event in your community and to learn more. You can also share #WearOrange social media posts online on June 5 or wear orange during online worship services on Sunday, June 7 to help promote this virtual event.

Dear Episcopal Branch of the Jesus Movement,
We want justice – but what do we do now?
Join us for an Episcopal Justice Assembly on June 10th at 3 PM PST. Now is the time to build our collective energy and moral vision. We will learn from Episcopalians who are leaders in the fight for economic and racial justice, speaking to this moment of crisis. This is our opportunity to share experiences and reflect on our communal call to faithful action in anticipation of the National Poor People’s Digital March on Washington June 20th. Register here to join the June 10th Assembly.
We have a long-term crisis of poverty and inequality, and of a society that has long ignored the names - Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Christian Cooper, George Floyd, Freddy Gray – a crisis counts over 100,000 COVID victims, and looming crisis of 140 million people who just one more one emergency away from being poor.
The Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington will be a transformative digital event driving Jesus’ vision and justice’s agenda into the heart of the national narrative. In this unprecedented moment, Episcopalians are telling the truth about the dire failures of our society and sharing the key to real and lasting change that lies within our communities.
What you can do now:
1. Sign up to join us on 6/10 -  Register here to join the June 10th Assembly.

 

2. Register for the Poor People’s Campaign - The “Episcopalian” link here.
3. Share with your parish and diocese.

 

Join us in coming together in a bold new way on June 10.
In the love of Christ that brings justice for all,
Episcopal Presiding Bishop’s Office Department of Racial Reconciliation, Justice, and Creation Care.

Join Dcn. Nelson for the next devotional. This month will be focused on La Guadalupana: Her Story, Our Prayer. This is a bilingual event, live on Facebook.
Please join us, Thursday, June 12th at 6:30 pm.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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Click below to view the congregational guide for Pentecost 2020

Pentecost 2020 Cong. Guide

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The Friday Reflection
May 29, 2020
The Rev. Deacon Tom Hampson

Thinking about adaptive leadership, my mind immediately goes to the now vintage TV series MacGyver. I loved that show and the amazing ways he would be able to fashion a solution to his problem – often a life-threatening one – out of various random items in the vicinity. Grace under pressure – and imagination under pressure, too.
In the press of rapid change and toppled plans, it takes a certain leap of imagination – and a certain freedom of imagination from the constraints of the moment to see the situation from another point of view, and sometimes discern a solution.
Chris Shaw is a friend of mine – a nurse who works in Boston specializing in HIV/AIDS care. Our friendship was forged back in the winter of 2002, when Chris agreed to volunteer to be medical officer for an HIV+ South African Choir tour that I was helping to lead. The tour would last two weeks and began in New York City. Their first concert was to be a World AIDS Day event (Dec. 1) at Riverside Church in Manhattan. The day before, we were giving them a tour of NYC. The one place they really wanted to visit was Ground Zero – the site of the former World Trade Center. Near the end of a long day, as the sun was setting, we drove to the site and walked to the edge to see the pit. It was a sad and sobering moment that prompted the choir to begin to sing – beautiful, plaintive songs from South Africa. A crowd gathered, their hearts lightened perhaps by their beautiful music. As we walked back to the van after this very moving interlude, I reached into my pocket for my van keys. Not there. Checked the other pockets. Nope. On this cold, late November day, darkness coming fast, I’d managed to lock us out of the van. Oh pshaw!
Calling AAA in Manhattan at any hour is a pretty frustrating experience – this was no exception. We were looking at hours. Locksmiths – “fuggetaboutit”. The choir was shivering. I was feeling awful and frustrated. Chris, good street-smart Bostonian that he was, tells me – “Hold it. I’ve got a thought.” He walks over to one of several street vendors who were hawking knockoff watches and handbags. After a brief conversation, the vendor strolls over to the van and casually reaches into his boot, removes a long piece of thin metal, and poof! The van is unlocked!
Not quite the drama of a MacGyver episode, but way more satisfying for me! And a lesson in recognizing that the resources you need to solve a problem may be right in front of you – but in a guise that requires some imagination, and experience, to recognize. During these COVID days, we’ve all been pushed to adapt in many ways – testing our patience and challenging our imagination – church via Zoom and Facebook Live, visitation of the sick via FaceTime, online choirs, clergy conferences and advocacy events. We’ve had to use the resources at hand, material – digital – human, in new ways to meet the challenge of this moment. And we’ve done it! Not always gracefully, but we’ve done it. That gives me hope as we approach Pentecost. As we celebrate that outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the first disciples, I see evidence all around us that the Spirit continues to inspire and guide us even in these difficult days. Thanks be to God!

       Latin@ Ministry Working Group
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin is looking for people interested in joining the Latin@ Ministry Working Group.
This group will work alongside the Latino Missioner to imagine and explore how Latino Ministry might happen throughout EDSJ. They will also support the ministries that the Latino Missioner has recently implemented, such as Devotionals about Virgin Mary in the Anglican/Episcopal tradition on the 12th of each month, and newly planned Latino presence for social media.
You do NOT need to speak Spanish in order to participate.
Please sign-up HERE and Deacon Nelson will be in touch shortly. Applications are due by the end of day June 3rd.

A message from the Latino Missioner, The Rev. Nelson Serrano Poveda, and SJRAISE.
Migrant friends in the Central Valley of California,
Because of the many organizations that we work with, we have received information on how you can apply to DRAI (Disaster Relief Assistance for Immigrants) funds. Remember that these resources are intended for UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS, who meet the requirements. PLEASE apply for this aid. Your information will only be taken into account for this purpose by the Non-Profit Organization, and at no time will it be forwarded to immigration institutions.
  1. In the counties of Alpine and Calaveras, you may contact the California Human Development Corporation at (707) 228-1338; More information on the website: www.californiahumandevelopment.org/
  2. In Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare and Mono counties, may contact the United Farm Workers Foundation (UFWF) at (877) 527-6660; more information on the website: www.ufwfoundation.org
  3. In Mariposa, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Sutter and Tuolumne counties, you may contact the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation (CRLAF) at (877) 557-0521, For more information you can enter the website: www.crlaf.org/drai
  4. In Inyo County, you can contact TODEC Legal Center Perris, at (888) 863-3291, or access the website: www.TODEC.org
To continue reading, download the full article HERE, also in Spanish.

Calculate Your Water Footprint
Find out what your water footprint is and how you can reduce your impact. This calculator will show you how your lifestyle impacts the rest of the world and how you can make a positive difference. Share with us ways you plan to reduce your footprint!

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Clergy COVID Conference
June 4 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Wear Orange
June 5
Information below
Commission on Ministry – Discernment Conference
June 6 | 9:00 AM
ZOOM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

Wear Orange is Friday, June 5. This 6th National Gun Violence Awareness Day, organized by Everytown and community partners across the country, honors both those killed by gun violence and those who have survived it. Everytown is holding virtual events across the country June 5-7 to raise awareness for gun violence prevention.
Visit the Wear Orange Weekend website for tools to promote the weekend on social media, to find a virtual event in your community and to learn more. You can also share #WearOrange social media posts online on June 5 or wear orange during online worship services on Sunday, June 7 to help promote this virtual event.

CANCELLED – RESCHEDULED 2021
Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Mark your calendars for June 18-25, 2021!
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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Click below to view the congregational guide for the 7th Sunday in Easter 2020

Congregational Guide for Easter 7 May 24, 2020)

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