Diocese of San
Joaquin
The Episcopal Church

The Friday Reflection Title
February 21, 2020
Rev. Lyn Morlan
Coming into the Diocese of San Joaquin in 2008, it was apparent that there had been a harmful style of leadership. There was one leader; everyone else was a follower. Dissenters or questioners were vilified and exiled. Lots of people had been wounded by this style. Two things I encountered: 1) there was a distrust of authority. It is extremely difficult to be a true leader of a faith community without trust. To this day, trust needs to be earned by a leader’s consistent actions and words. If you say one thing and do another, there will be resistance.
2) The leadership of the laity had been crushed to the detriment of congregational growth. This was apparent in the way even lay leaders sought power, as demonstrated by prior authority figures, instead of working to find new solutions or compromise. We need the laity to be responsible leaders in our churches.
Establishing lay leadership is not new to the Episcopal Church. I remember going to classes on leadership back in the 1980′s when I was a member of Christ the Lord Episcopal Church in Pinole. The Cursillo movement was dependent on lay leaders. Dave and I were active members of Cursillo in the East Bay. Lay leaders planned and carried out the 4-day weekend retreats. Yes, there were spiritual directors (I’ve done that too); they planned the liturgies and were there for pastoral care only.
As we begin the 13th year following the schism, let’s continue to strive for positive leadership. At St. Anne’s, time and energy has been spent on learning to trust each other. Jesus and his followers trusted each other; there is our positive role model. Being missional church, we are challenged to look beyond our church building to our community and to find God working there and – dare we say – join God in the work.
We all have experience with good and bad leaders in both secular and church settings. We are formed and learn from both. Let us strive to be responsible leaders. We are called to be involved. The ‘…’ gives each of us the freedom to discern how we will lead.
When Bishop David first came to the diocese, he asked the clergy to read “Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading” by Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky.   I recommend it for all of you who would be responsible leaders.

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registration will open in late February.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at:
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
 Submission requirements:

pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF

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Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Joint Diocesan Council & Standing Committee Meeting
February 28-29
ECCO
Chrism Mass
April 7 | 10 am
St. James Episcopal Cathedral
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
Public House Night
St. Anne’s, Stockton
February 21-22 | 6:00 – 8:30 pm
See more info HERE
St. Matthew’s, San Andreas Lenten Practice
EVERY FRIDAY IN LENT | 5 PM
Stations of the Cross
and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament
followed by a Soup Supper in the Parish Hall

DAY OF DISCERNMENT
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, March 7 from 9:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Modesto. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a
question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the
priesthood.
The cost of this event is $10 and includes morning snacks and lunch. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information and to register, please contact Deacon Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator:
dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.
Register online HERE

WAIT UNTIL THE LAUNDRY BASKET IS FULL TO WASH
Only do laundry when the load is full. Not only does this save water and electricity but it also will save you money and time. You can either wait until you have more items to wash, or combine your partial load with your family or housemates.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
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Click the links below to see either the ROTA or Readings for March 2020. They are also available on the calendar page which can be accessed by clicking on the calendar tab at the top of the page.

March 2020 ROTA

March 2020 readings

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Diocese of San
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The Episcopal Church

The Friday Reflection Title
February 14, 2020
Terry March, Postulant to the Diaconate
“Called to be…leaders”
     The world’s way of leadership is about power and manipulation, achieving goals by bending others to your will, and forcing desired outcomes. As Christians, we have remarkable examples of leadership that turns the worldly system of leadership upside down. Our Lord, Jesus Christ, tells us there is a better way. Jesus personifies all the virtues and attributes of leadership and not only tells us, through scripture, how to lead, but more importantly shows us the true actions of leadership.
   Jesus talked about the worldly model of leadership when the disciples were squabbling about who would be the greatest. Jesus tells them, “The kings of the Gentiles lord it over them; and those in authority over them are called benefactors. But not so with you; rather the greatest among you must become like the youngest, and the leader like the one who serves.”[1] Jesus calls us to be different and tells us that godly leadership is about serving others. When we serve by coming along side others, helping them reach their goals, what we are really doing is loving them.
   Jesus was not afraid to challenge those he led and out of love saw the potential of those whom he called to be leaders. If we had been there when Jesus called the apostles to follow Him, we may have only seen them as fishermen, tax collectors, zealots or thieves. Jesus looked beyond what they were and instead saw what they could become. Jesus believed in his followers, gave them important things to do and inspired them to experience the world with love to develop their souls to new achievements.
   Because of His great and perfect love, Jesus was patient with others and followed the prompts of God. During the arrest of Jesus, one of His worried disciples drew a sword, struck the slave of the high priest, cutting off the slave’s right ear. Without anger, Jesus said, “No more of this!”[2] Jesus’ admonishment of the disciple’s action was kind, yet firm. Jesus then quietly touched and healed the servant’s ear. A leader shows love to others and can give corrective feedback in a calm, loving and helpful manner when mistakes are made.
   Leading like Jesus is a simple concept in principle but sometimes difficult to live out in our daily lives. We must remember that the people we meet in our churches, marketplaces, workplaces, and elsewhere in the world are all God’s people and are our brothers and sisters. We are called to seek and serve Christ in all persons, loving our neighbors as ourselves, striving for justice and peace, and respecting the dignity of every human being. God knows we are not perfect leaders like Jesus but God has given us the perfect example by which to lead. And we are called to grow into greater leadership, primarily because a leader was willing to invest love, patience, kindness, time and effort to lead us.

[1] Lk 22:25-26 NRSV
[2] Lk 22:50-51

Did you know that SJRAISE, Our Immigration Commission, has a new monthly newsletter? You can check it out HERE and subscribe at the bottom, or email Deacon Angela at dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org to be added!

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registration will open in late February.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at:
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
 Submission requirements:

pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF

Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Joint Diocesan Council & Standing Committee Meeting
February 28-29
ECCO
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
Public House Night
St. Anne’s, Stockton
February 21-22 | 6:00 – 8:30 pm
See more info HERE

A letter from Bishop David to St. James Cathedral regarding Dean Ryan Newman
February 11, 2020
Sisters and Brothers of St. James, Cathedral,
I trust by now most of you have heard the news regarding the health of our Cathedral Dean, Ryan Newman.  If you are unaware, Ryan fell ill last week at the close of our Clergy Conference at ECCO.  Fortunately, Erin, Ryan’s wife was with him.  Ryan was admitted at Clovis Community Hospital on Saturday with concerns of a heart attack. Since then he has been diagnosed with Myocarditis which is an inflammation of the heart muscle and potentially leads to a high risk of heart failure.  As you would hope and expect, hospital staff is monitoring Ryan quite closely.  I write this “pastoral letter” on Tuesday and every indication to date is that Ryan will remain in hospital through the week.  Additionally, Ryan will need time away from his “deanship” responsibilities in order to recover.

CUT YOUR SHOWER BY 5 MINUTES
Cut five minutes off your shower to save water. According to a study done by Harvard the average american shower uses 2.5 gallons per minute. You will save 12.5 gallons of water if you shorten by just 5 minutes. Or, consider turning the water off while you lather up and only turn it on to rinse.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
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Sunday 9th February 2020, Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany St Anne”s Episcopal Church, Stockton.

Father Christian

How would you answer if someone asked you to define yourself? What is your identity? Some people might answer with what they do to earn a living. “I am an engineer.” “l am a personal injury attorney”. Others would identify themselves with the the different roles they carry out. “l am a mother of three young children.” “l am a volunteer at my church.” Still others identify themselves by their accomplishments. “l am the best basketball player on my school team.” There are problems, however, with identifying ourselves in these ways. If my job or my role is my identity, what happens when that changes? Who am I then on the day of my retirement? You can begin to see how much emotional damage takes place, when we get our identity from what we do or what we have done. You can begin to see why some people have such a difficult time in retirement or when they can no longer do what they once did. They feel they have lost their identity. So how do you avoid such a fate? You listen to Jesus. Jesus tells you who you are. And, whether you are young or old, employed or retired, whether you can still play the game or not, your identity will never change.

Our text is a portion of Jesus’ famous Sermon on the mount. The Sermon on the Mount was directed at Jesus’ disciples. It is also meant for Christians. Jesus is explaining what it is like to be one of His followers! He was saying, “People who are part of my Kingdom are blessed because they are poor in Spirit, and they are meek and thirst for righteousness.” Now, Jesus continues the introduction by telling His people who they are. He is telling you your identity. “You are the salt of the earth”.Take note that Jesus did not say, “You SHOULD be” or “You WILL be” or “I wish you WERE.” He says you ARE the salt of the earth.” Salt has many uses. It seasons food. It preserves food, keeping it from rotting. Salt is necessary for the human body. Salt is critical to life on earth. The point that Jesus is making is that as a child of God, a believer in and follower of Jesus Christ, you are critical to life on this earth. You are keeping this world from rotting. You are keeping this world from deteriorating into a hell on earth.

“You,” Jesus says, “Are the salt that keeps this world from becoming as rotten as a piece of meat lying out in the hot sun. I have made you humble and meek and merciful and kind . I have made you loving and patient and generous. You, my people, are sprinkled around this world, preserving it. “

And Jesus says, “You are the light of the world…Let your light shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in Heaven.” The people of this world are living in darkness. They are stumbling around, trying to find meaning and purpose, trying to figure out what is right or wrong, trying to find some source of truth and certainty. They are lost in the darkness of their own sin and unbelief. But, there you are, a light shining in a dark place.. There you are showing them truth and love. Jesus says “A city set on a hill cannot be hidden.” Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.” You are the light of the world!! It would make no sense to hide who you are, and

WHOSE you are! Let your light shine wherever you are. Let your spouse see that you are GOD’S. Let your children see that you are GOD’S.. Let your fellow fans see that you are GOD’S. Let your friends on facebook see that you are GOD’S. Let your coworkers see that you are GOD’S.

Let them see your true identity. Your identity is the light of the world. That is who you are. That is what God has made to be. Jesus says so!! This does not change. You are salt of the earth. You are the light of the world. And you will be for the rest of your life. You do not lose that identity. You will be salt and light in every situation you find yourself. You see, when you are a citizen of God’s kingdom, your identity is not dependent upon your circumstances. It is who you are. Now therefore we must be reminded that our identity is a gift of God’s grace. Jesus is here this morning to tell us that our sins are such serious business that he came all the way to our world in order to fulfill God’s demands. He also said that all our sins that we have failed, He has fulfilled for us. And that is why we are salt of the earth and light of the world.

If you are under the impression when you came here this morning that you are not particularly important or that your life has no meaning, Jesus assures you that you are the salt of the earth.

You are the light of the world. Thank you Jesus for making it so. AMEN!

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Diocese of San
Joaquin
The Episcopal Church

The Friday Reflection Title
February 7, 2020
Rev. Andy Anderson
“Called to be…leaders”
…God has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers; then deeds of power, then gifts of healing, forms of assistance, forms of leadership, various kinds of tongues.[1]
What attributes should a leader exemplify? Integrity, reliability, honesty, forthrightness are just a few of the terms to consider. Many of you have worn the mantle of leadership during your lives, just as I have. Thinking back to those times. Were you/me satisfied with the results? What could we have done to make the experiences more productive or relevant? What can or will we do in future leadership roles?
I have found that to be an effective leader is to lead by example. I would never ask anything of those I lead that I would not or could not undertake myself. Regularly on a Sunday, I preach loving my neighbor as myself. Yet, at times, I find it difficult to follow my admonition on the other six days.
Our nation is in the midst of a maelstrom politically and ethically. Called to be a leader carries great responsibilities. As clergy, I must speak out against social injustices or oppression of any kind. I must champion positivity, such as inclusiveness, forgiveness, and kindness. I once believed that my actions spoke louder than my words, but not anymore. Our social media platforms are rife with vengeful, hate-filled speech, and fingerpointing. In this tumultuous society, the language I use sets the tone for my leadership. I can think of no better way to model “Called to be…” leadership than the words of St. Teresa of Avila.

“Christ has no body now but yours. No hands, no feet on earth but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world. Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body. Christ has no body now on earth, but yours.”
– Teresa of Avila[2]


[1]1 Corinthians 12:26-28 Or spiritual persons. , New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Did you know that SJRAISE, Our Immigration Commission, has a new monthly newsletter? You can check it out HERE and subscribe at the bottom, or email Deacon Angela at dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org to be added!

Companions in Franciscan Spirituality for 2020:  Ten-Day Residential Immersion Programs in Franciscan Spirituality offered three times a year for free by The Community of St. Francis at St. Francis House in San Francisco for women over 18.  The program includes studying Franciscan spirituality and living out of that spirituality by sharing in our community life, worship and ministry in the church and wider community.
April 3-13; July 3-13; Oct. 2-12.
For more information, contact Sr. Pamela Clare at pamelaclarecsf@aol.com.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at:
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
 Submission requirements:

pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF

Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Spring Clergy Conference
February 4-6
ECCO
Building Church Leaders Conference
February 7-8
ECCO
Register HERE
Joint Diocesan Council & Standing Committee Meeting
February 28-29
ECCO
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
Fresno Mayoral Forum
St. James Cathedral, Fresno
February 13 | 6:00 – 8:00 pm
See more info HERE
Public House Night
St. Anne’s, Stockton
February 21-22 | 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registration will open in February.

UNPLUG SOCKETS FROM THE WALL
OR POWER STRIP
When appliances are not in use they should be unplugged.
The socket draws electricity even when it is off. Some items
that are often plugged in when not in use are blow-dryers,
phone chargers, electric kettles, and coffee pots. Look
around your house and find what can be unplugged.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
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Click either of the links below to veiw.

Februrary 2020 ROTA

February 2020 readings

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Diocese of San
Joaquin
The Episcopal Church

The Friday Reflection Title
January 31, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael
Dear friends,
Last week (Jan 20-24), I had the privilege of flying with Pat Fehling, a leading lay woman from St John’s Lodi to Atlanta, Georgia for the Rooted in Jesus conference. I was doubly privileged to have Dean Ryan of the Cathedral meet us there. San Joaquin was in the house!
Let me say from the outset that I love conferences because I get to learn new stuff, I get to network and see old friends, and I get to tell our story as the people of San Joaquin. So yes, I was super stoked to go to Atlanta! This was the first year that this conference was held, and it was the combination of about seven smaller conferences that occur with some regularity. As I overheard one person say (while standing in line for the bathroom), “this is the best of General Convention without all the legislative work”. In other words, it was an opportunity to focus on our formation as leaders of the Jesus Movement.
After the pre-conference workshops on Tuesday, we were shuttled to Clark Atlanta University on Wednesday for the keynote address offered by The Rev. Dr. William Barber. Friends, if you have not heard Dr. Barber preach, you are missing out!! Dr. Barber has gotten a reputation as quite the prophetic voice and public witness in Washington DC, leading the “Moral Monday” movement as well as the Poor People’s Campaign.
During his keynote address, which, let’s be honest it was actually a sermon, Dr. Barber continually returned to the refrain “You can’t worship God without a conscious and concern for the poor”. I knew I was in good company when 1500 Episcopalians erupted in applause. He also went so far as to say “worshiping God without a conscious is a heresy”. Wow! He was on fire with the Holy Spirit and I was feeling it deep in my bones. Dr. Barber, like all good prophets of our holy scriptures, stands at the city gate and reminds us of our responsibility as Christians…that we aren’t meant to be boxed in, but rather in our neighborhoods and communities, sharing the love of God and taking care of each other.
Following Dr. Barber’s sermon, there was a panel discussion with The Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglass (Dean of EDS at Union Theological Seminary), The Rt. Rev. Rob Wright (bishop of Atlanta), and The Rev. Nancy Frausto (whom we love). These three folks are without a doubt, prophets. Dean Douglass reminded us that being Church in the 21st Century means being aspirational…we are supposed to dream big dreams, because that’s what God has called us to do. Rev. Nancy called us to attention by asking how we, as the Church, can better respond to the separation of families at the border and the putting of children in cages. And then, in his prophetic way, Bp Rob woke us up when he said that the Church, by losing it’s prophetic voice, has become complacent and has in fact abdicated it’s consciousness, in exchange for keeping people (and pledge dollars) in the seats. He went so far as to say (and granted I’m paraphrasing) that we are invited to partner with God, and that if we don’t accept that invitation, we (as the church) will be a “clique with a cracker on Sunday”. Holy smokes friends! The room went silent while I applauded. I don’t want to be a part of that clique! I don’t want my church to be that clique! And I’m not willing to turn down the invitation to partner with God! Wow! The discussion then opened up into the Atlanta Revival and the Presiding Bishop preached about the Way of Love, the Jesus Movement, and reminded all of us that “If it’s not about love, then it’s not about God”.
After a few days of back to back workshops on leadership, stewardship, formation, and mission, we concluded our conference with a rousing Eucharist at the nearby All Saints Episcopal Church. And friends, we were indeed “taken to church”. The jazz musicians, the bilingual liturgy, and the preaching offered by The Rev. Dr. Mark Jefferson blew the roof off the place! And, like the preachers before him, Rev. Jefferson asked the congregation this provocative and prophetic question: What happens when we go back to the places that Jesus thought were important-to where people are marginalized and disenfranchised-to do our ministry? Like Dr. Barber, PB Curry, and Bp Rob had asked, what happens when we step out into our neighborhoods as disciples of Jesus? What happens when we respond to the world in love, with a consciousness, and with an eye for justice? What happens when we stop being afraid of being prophetic and instead start living into the ministry that Jesus has called ALL of us, lay and ordained?
I think I have an answer…
It means we’ll be the Church at its best.
And not a clique on Sunday with a cracker.
The church is indeed aspirational, Dean Douglass.
God’s Blessing be with you all,
Cn. Anna

Free Food in Taft!
Laborers of the Harvest is giving away 70 pounds of food per household in the city of Taft! If you, or someone you know is in need of food in the area, feel free to share this flyer!

Calling all NEWLY ELECTED/APPOINTED Wardens/Treasurers!
Join Bishop David, Canon Anna, Chancellor Michael, and Diocesan Treasurer Cathy Peck
February 7 beginning at 4pm and concluding the afternoon of February 8 at ECCO
(Episcopal Conference Center at Oakhurst)
For a conference on Episcopal polity, leadership skills, and financial best practices.
This will be an opportunity to learn why we do what we do, how to work with the canons, and how to be transparent about our church finances.
ALL VESTRY/BISHOP’S COMMITTEE/CHAPTER MEMBERS are invited for February 8 beginning at 9am.
Registration [Due by January 17]: diosanjoaquin.org [click, Register Building Church Leaders]
Private rooms: FILLED
Double rooms: $66.50
Quad rooms: $56.50
Registration fee: $10
Registration is for lodging, meals and materials.
It is the expectation that all Wardens/Treasurers will attend.
Contact Canon Anna with questions

Companions in Franciscan Spirituality for 2020:  Ten-Day Residential Immersion Programs in Franciscan Spirituality offered three times a year for free by The Community of St. Francis at St. Francis House in San Francisco for women over 18.  The program includes studying Franciscan spirituality and living out of that spirituality by sharing in our community life, worship and ministry in the church and wider community.
April 3-13; July 3-13; Oct. 2-12.
For more information, contact Sr. Pamela Clare at pamelaclarecsf@aol.com.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at:
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
 Submission requirements:

pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF

Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Canon Anna and Rev. Nancy Frausto
Canon Anthony Guillen, Rev. Samuel Borbon, and Canon Anna

  Rev. Melanie Mullen and Canon Anna

The Rev. William Barber II

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Spring Clergy Conference
February 4-6
ECCO
Building Church Leaders Conference
February 7-8
ECCO
Register HERE
Joint Diocesan Council & Standing Committee Meeting
February 28-29
ECCO
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
Public House Night
St. Anne’s, Stockton
February 21-22 | 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registration will open in February.

BUY A PLANT FOR YOUR HOUSE
It may not be the season to plant a tree or garden outside but you can purchase a plant for the indoors. The plant will produce oxygen improve your indoor air quality. You can choose a flower, herb, or a plant that bears fruit such as a tomato, pepper, or strawberries.

Did you know that SJRAISE, Our Immigration Commission, has a new monthly newsletter? You can check it out HERE and subscribe at the bottom, or email Deacon Angela at dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org to be added!

Concert series at St. James, Sonora. February 2nd at 2 pm (Time change for Super Bowl!). Come hear pianist Anyssa Neumann live.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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09. May 2019 · Comments Off · Categories: Uncategorized

Special service on Sunday, October 6.  We will be combining with Zion Lutheran (808 Porter Street) at Zion Lutheran.  The service begins at 10 a.m. and we are pleased to have the Rev. Dr. Canon Anna Carmichael preaching.  Following the service there will be a Blessing of the Animals outdoors in Zion’s courtyard.

On October 13, we are back at St. Anne’s with a service time of 9:00 a.m.

On October 20, we go to winter service time of 10:00 a.m.

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