The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin
The Friday Reflection Title

August 16, 2013 

 

GATHERING AS A DIOCESE

 

We in San Joaquin are fully aware that the church is not a building. We’ve said it over and over again in the midst of the split that took place in this diocese. Perhaps more than most Episcopalians we have come to understand that the church is a community of people who gather in the name of Jesus and not the place or building where we gather. Those of us who belong to congregations know how much more fully our faith can be expressed as we gather in community.

 

We gather, too, as a diocese as an expression that we are a community of faith. It is in gathering that we are most the Diocese of San Joaquin.

 

We have two important occasions soon upon us to have the opportunity to gather as a diocese to express our faith in worship and action. We will gather over Labor Day weekend for the annual Celebration of Ministry conference to be held at ECCO. The Rev. Eric Law will be our presenter for a fun and informative weekend of learning about the abundance of gifts already given to us by God. We will also gather at the end of October for our annual diocesan convention. Our annual convention is a place to conduct business as a diocese, but it is also much more. It is the chance to come together to worship, share, greet old friends and new, and to just have fun at our fabulous Friday evening of festivities and jazz music. We come together with our bishop to be the Diocese of San Joaquin.

 

A registration form for the Celebration of Ministry Conference can be found  here.

A registration form for Diocesan Convention can be found here.

 

See you all at both gatherings.

 

Canon Kate+

 

“Participating in God’s Reconciling Love”

From Commission on Ministry…

Ministry retreat 2013 Kaleidoscope Institute

Celebration of Ministry Conference

with the Rev. Eric Law

August 30- September 1, 2013

 

Special Note:  Please send in your registrations now so that we can properly plan for meals and rooms.

 

I was involved with the Kaleidoscope Program with Eric back around 2004.   I have taken two or three other courses with him since then.  Eric is quite insightful in his approach in offering material that can transform individuals and congregations.   I have begun reading his book Holy Currencies, and am finding that it gives some good language to connect many aspects of our common life and help energize the congregation for mission.  Eric is a gift to our diocese and I commend the Ministry Conference to everyone.  Hope to see y’all there.  -Fr. Paul Colbert, Diocese of San Joaquin

We welcome The Rev. Eric Law as our conference leader for this year’s ministry event at ECCO. Eric Law is the Founder and Executive Director of the Kaleidoscope Institute, the mission of which is to create inclusive and sustainable churches and communities.

 

For more than 20 years, he has provided transformative and comprehensive training and resources for churches and ministries in all the major church denominations in the United State and Canada. He is the author of 7 books including The Wolf Shall Dwell with the Lamb and, his latest Holy Currencies: Six Blessings for Sustainable Missional Ministries. You may order Holy Currencies on the Amazon website, either in print form or download to your Kindle reader.

Remember, the Ministry Conferences are for everyone in our Diocese! Laity and clergy alike will learn a great deal about transforming the way we think about church, “from a static, linear and maintenance-type mode to a dynamic, circulatory, and rejuvenating vision of a church that interacts with the wider community…”

To read more about The Rev. Eric Law and the Kaleidoscope Institute, visit their website at www.kscopeinstitute.org.

To register for the Annual Celebration of Ministry Retreat click here for the registration form and click here for the Retreat Schedule Registration forms are due August 15, 2013.   There will be a $10 fee for late registration.

Focus on Anti-Racism Training …

Anti-Racism training is being offered in the Diocese of California on September 6 and 7, 2013. The sessions run from 10 am to 6 pm and attendance on both days is required for certification. The training will be held at Church of the Epiphany in San Carlos and the fee is $50 which includes lunch and training materials. You must register by September 1, 2013. More information can be found at www.diocal.org or by contacting Fr. Eric at ericm@diocal.org

St. James, Sonora Festival Welcoming Eucharist…

 

St. James, Sonora  

St. James Episcopal Church

 affectionately known as “The Red Church”

 

 

Festival Welcoming Eucharist 

 

September 8, 2013

4:00 p.m. 

42 Snell Street

Sonora, CA 95370

Map

St. James Episcopal Church welcomes all to our Festival Welcoming Eucharist, Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served after the service.

The entire community is welcome to come join in song, praise, and thanksgiving for St. James Episcopal Church in Sonora. Bishop Chet Talton will be our celebrant and preacher.
Come and bring friends to join us in our celebration!

 

 

From the Diocesan Office…

 

  Dio seal

The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin

54th Annual Convention

October 25 and 26, 2013

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Modesto

Participating in God’s Reconciling Love

” So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled with your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.”

- Matthew 5:23-24

 

Registration Forms available on-line now at www.diosanjoaquin.org

Did You Know…

 DID YOU KNOW . . . 

To say Gloria Patri after the Psalm, or not to say Gloria Patri, after the Psalm, that is the question.

 

If you travel to different congregations like I do, you have to pause for a second to see if the congregation is going to say the Gloria Patri or not. Some do, some don’t, and I think once in a while I’ve even seen a Lector uncertain as to whether to launch into it or not.

 

I suppose I should first make sure we all know to what I am referring. It is, of course, the Doxologia Minor.

 

“Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto.

Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.”

 

Or, as is more commonly known to us,

“Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.”

 

Where does our guidance come from? Is it actually allowed or just something that gets done anyway? Let’s take a look at the Book of Common Prayer, in the Additional Directions section on page 406. (By the way, if you haven’t figured it out, I’m doing these to encourage people to explore the BCP and find the interesting things which are in it.)

 

“When a psalm is used, it may be concluded with Gloria Patri. In

Rite One services, the following form of the Gloria may be used:

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, *

and to the Holy Ghost:

As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, *

world without end. Amen.”

 

All right, now we know that it is . . . optional. We also know how to say it in Rite I services. (The wording of the contemporary version can be found on page 84.) So what do we do? Ask your priest! They are the appropriate ones to make the decision in their congregations. Either way is permitted by the BCP rubrics, so follow local custom, secure in the knowledge that whether you say it or not, you’ve got in right.

Deacon Carolyn Woodall

From the Diocesan Office…

Please mark your calendar for these upcoming meetings and events. Watch for additional details in the Friday Reflection.

  • Sustainability Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 9:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Standing Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 11:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Celebration of Ministry Retreat, August 30 through September 1, 2013, ECCO
  • Parish and Mission Audit Committee Teleconference Meeting, September 6, 2013, 10 a.m.
  • Festival Welcoming Eucharist, September 8, 2013, 4:00 p.m., St. James, Sonora
  • Northern Deanery Clericus, September 10, 2013, 11:00 a.m., St Matthew’s,San Andreas

 

 

Do you wish to see what else the Diocese is up to? Click here for The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin calendar.

 

From our Parishes and Missions…

  Christ the King

2nd Annual Raise the Roof

 

Saturday August 24, 2013

5:30 p.m.

(Doors will open at 5:00 p.m.)

6443 Estelle Avenue

Riverbank, CA 95367

Live Music

The Fun Strummers

Nails of Glory

and

BOOK

 

Comedy

1940s radio comedy form the evenings emcee Phil Schmitt

Italian catered dinner with dessert.

Wine glasses are available for $10 each and include two tickets for wine pours.

Tickets: Adults for $25.00

 Children 12 and under for $12.00

For more information  call Christ the King at 209-869-1075 or find us on Face book: Christ the King Community Episcopal Churc

Christian Rock Band BOOK

 

St. John the Bapisit Flyer

For our Diocesan Prayer Calendar…. click here

Bishop’s and Canon’s Calendars…

Bishop Talton’s Calendar 

 

August 30- September 1    Ministry Conference, ECCO

 

September 8                       St. James, Sonora –  Welcoming Eucharist

 

September 15                     Church of the Saviour, Hanford

 

October 6                            St. Francis, Turlock

 

October 13                          St. Paul’s, Visalia

 

 

 

Canon Cullinane’s Calendar

 

 

August 18                    St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 25                    St. Paul’s Bakersfield

 

August 30-September 1      Ministry Conference, ECCO

September 8                       St. James, Sonora- Welcoming Eucharist

 

Keep up to date on news and events with the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin website www.diosanjoaquin.orgClick here: Our Website
Contact Information
phone: 209-576-0104
Join Our Mailing List

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Sermon

Proper 16, Year C

The words of Isaiah this morning are from “Third Isaiah”.  “The Book of Isaiah is a composite work, the product of several different prophets who ministered at different periods in the history ofIsrael.”  (HarperCollins Study Bible, Introduction to Isaiah)  In a nutshell, First Isaiah predicts the downfall of the kingdom of Judah and the scattering of the people; Second Isaiah brings a message of hope and deliverance to the people living in exile and predicting their return to Judah; Third Isaiah speaks to the people that have returned and the prophet urges them to stay true to God in spite of the harshness of life they have as returnees to Judah.  Third Isaiah reiterates the promise of Second Isaiah that those who stay true to God will receive the riches promised eternal joy and prosperity.

So the words written for the Israelites in early 500 BCE, “if you offer your food to the hungry and satisfy the needs of the afflicted…if you call the Sabbath a delight and the holy day of the Lord honorable; if you honor it, not going your own ways, serving your own interests, or pursuing your own affairs; then you shall take delight in the Lord” (verses 10a, 13-14) seem to be twisted around by the time Jesus is teaching.

This morning as Jesus is teaching he notices a woman who has been crippled for, we are told, eighteen years.  He lays hands on her and she is released from the bondage that has held her captive for eighteen years.  He was satisfying the needs of the afflicted, but the leader of the synagogue is indignant because he has “cured” on the sabbath.  Now laying hands on someone does not sound like work to us today, but in obeying the letter of the law, it was.  There was a disconnect at times between the strict adherence to the law and the intent of the law.

Last week, Jesus spoke about not bringing peace, but bringing division.  His mission was to bring change, and a good example of that is in the gospel for today.  You untie your animals and lead them to water on the sabbath.   Why not free a person from their afflictions on the sabbath?  The group is divided between the leaders who have been put to shame and the people who rejoice at the works of his hand.  This is the third time that Jesus has created a sabbath controversy teaching in the synagogue.

Today, as we sit comfortably in our pews, we need to honestly confront what is holding us in bondage.  What has you all tied up?  There are physical ailments, like the woman in the story this morning, that may be easy to see, but not so simple to heal.  There are emotional bonds that tie us in ways we may not even realize, but they have an effect on our relationships and our ability to function.  There are changes in our life that paralyze us.  The world is full of violence and natural disasters.  So what can we do?

We are in the difficult place of called to be a helper to the afflicted and being one of the afflicted.  Many times we are able to help someone because they are bound by the same affliction that we experience.  Reaching out to help others in need helps us to reduce our own bondage.  That is one reason we come together in community.  We gather on Sunday to get the support and healing we need to go out and work in the world for another week.  We are called to help each other loose those bonds which keep us from being whole.  And thank God, that Jesus has made it perfectly acceptable to do that any time and any place, even on Sunday in church.

This week be mindful of those around you.  Be a light in the darkness.  Do the small things that just might make a difference in the life of someone suffering from an affliction.  It can be as easy as just looking and seeing that person as a child of God.        AMEN.

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Sermon

Proper 15, August 18, 2013

          Was there a time when you felt that you had to go through something very difficult and painful to get something good?  I think about being pregnant, which isn’t too bad at first, but going through labor to give birth is difficult and painful.  The results are definitely worth the discomfort.  Maybe you’ve had a colonoscopy – the prep is terrible, but the peace of mind knowing you are healthy is worth it.  Surgery is another time when people go through much pain and discomfort to be able to be restored to health, to be able to do activities that they used to do and that brought them joy.  Or how about moving?  There’s moving into your first place and there is moving after you’ve lived in the same home for 30+ years.  Getting the house ready for sale, downsizing your belongings, packing and then unpacking!

          In our gospel this morning, Jesus is “expressing his longing for closure.  In verse 50a, he mentions the baptism with which he must be baptized — a veiled reference to his death.  In verse 50b, he mentions the stress that he is under until his baptism/death is completed.  This reference in 49b then appears to be a longing to face the crucifixion and to move through it to the victory of the empty tomb.  His crucifixion will be terrible, but the anticipation of it is terrible too.  He longs to get it behind him.”  (SermonWriter, Dick Donovan)  It can be true of the situations that we’ve already cited – pregnancy, medical tests, surgery – things that the anticipation is awful and we long for it to be over. 

          Not everyone will be able to identify with these particular situations, but I’m sure that we all have had a time when we just wanted something to be over.  We have experienced change in some form and maybe we’ve had to suffer through anticipating the change and eventually getting use to the new situation.  Miracles of miracles, once in a while the change is actually good!

          Jesus points out that he has not come to bring peace, but division.  That is not a really comforting thought.  Jesus was sent to bring change.  “Jesus came into this world to establish thekingdom ofGod.  He came to transform the world, and that kind of transformation does not come easily.  Many who are first in this world will be last in thekingdom ofGod (13:30), and cannot be expected to accept this reversal without a fight.  Throughout his ministry, Jesus comforts the afflicted (those without power) and afflicts the comfortable (those in power).   Throughout his ministry, Jesus experiences conflict that will culminate on the cross.”  (SermonWriter, Dick Donovan)

           How many times have you experienced change bringing peace?  Most of the time, there is division and in some cases for some people there may never be peace.  It even happens in churches.  Recall the joke about “How many Episcopalians does it take to change a light bulb?’’  The answers range from “Change?” or “My grandmother donated that light bulb, you can’t change it.”  In fact if you don’t think there could be division within the church, try suggesting that next time we paint the church we should paint it off-white and just leave the trim red!  Change is difficult, but change to help move us toward thekingdomofGodis necessary for growth, for life.

          Talk to the people who have moved from their temporary church homes back to churches that have been returned to our diocese.  The congregations inTurlock- St. Francis; Ridgecrest – St. Michael’s; Bakersfield – St. Paul’s; and Sonora – St. James.  The Episcopalians returning to those churches after almost six years are dealing with decisions about what to keep and what to give away.  They have a new worship space and the ability to change how they worship.  They also have the ability to change and define the work of the congregation given the new space.  How will they change to serve their community?

          That’s our question, too.  Our office and classroom buildings are OLD!  They are functional because we have become use to them, but are they able to help us serve our surrounding community to the best of our ability?  I think we are called to do more than provide a safe, affordable meeting place for all the groups that meet here.  We have the frightening and exciting opportunity to change – to grow – to bring a bit more of thekingdomofGodright here. 

What will it look like?  How much will we change?  The only thing I know for sure is that the church and parish hall will remain essentially the same.  The new building or buildings will be defined by what type of ministry we feel God is calling us to do.  In the reading from Jeremiah, God is speaking.  God is near by, not far away.  God tells those prophets “Let the prophet who has a dream tell the dream, but let the one who has my word speak my word faithfully.”  We are the people of God and we are the prophets today.  Go and dream. Talk with God.  And then let us come together and listen to what God is calling St. Anne’s to do.  AMEN.

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Sermon

Proper 14, Year C

 

Grant us Lord, the spirit to think and do always those things that are right…

 

The letter to the Hebrews starts with faith.  This faith in God is what makes Abraham righteous in God’s eyes.  It says that by faith our ancestors received approval.  If you’ve read the Old Testament, you too might take exception to that statement by the writer of Hebrews.  Many times those generations of Abraham forgot their faith and trusted in either earthly power or other gods.  The prophets expressed to the people the anger of God at their actions.  

The key to their salvation is re-turning to God.  Like a parent who invites the child to come and sit, let’s talk about this behavior that is not acceptable.  The fact that God, who is completely disgusted with these people and their empty rituals, would consider a remedy is a tribute to God’s love and grace.  No matter how bad their behavior, God still loves them and seeks to give them everything.  Unfortunately, we forget that we can have -and that God yearns for us to have – these face-to-face conversations.  We can express to God the emotions that we are feeling:  anger, hurt, fear, grief, as well as joy, peace, wonder, thankfulness and love.

Take Abraham, he speaks directly to God about his frustration, shame, and even his unbelief at the promise.  Abraham and Sarah have been obedient to God; their “faith” gave them the courage to leave wealth and comfort and familiarity for the promise of an inheritance, even if that faith wavers at times.  Abraham at the end of the conversation believes the Lord.  Does God want anything different from us today? 

Not really.  God wants to give us the kingdom.  In the gospel, Jesus in talking with his disciples echoes the phrase that God uses with Abram “Do not be afraid.”  Following our lesson from last week about the rich man who stores up his treasure on earth and forgets God and how that doesn’t go so well, Jesus is reassuring his disciples that all their earthly needs will be taken care of.  That they should not worry, but instead to work for the kingdom of God and their needs will be met.  Then he goes on to tell them this morning how they should act.

Jesus tells us to get prepared.  Give up the wealth, comfort and familiarity of the earthly things that keep us from doing God’s work here.  To trade what we have now for a promise of treasure in heaven – forever.  God knows that we must start now, today, because we just don’t know how much time we have.  This lesson is abundantly clear as we can hear and read each day about accidents that take lives – car, train, airplane, bus, and natural disasters such as floods and fires. 

Think about being prepared for a natural disaster.  How many of us have put together a disaster preparedness kit?  The kit needed to include water, non perishable food, blankets, first aid supplies, flashlights and batteries, a radio – things that would be needed to help us survive the first few days following the disaster.  Our diocese has required each congregation to complete a Disaster Preparedness form – I have been remiss in completing this requirement.  It’s difficult to imagine that St. Anne’s will be affected by some disaster – but that’s just it – we don’t know.

I was in the 1989 San Francisco earthquake.  Literally.  At the time I worked as assistant controller for a hotel in downtown San Francisco.  The controller was at Candlestick, so I stayed at work and we did whatever was necessary that first 24 hours.  Even going through that, I didn’t put together a ‘kit’ after it was all over.  The farther we move from an event or from a natural disaster zone, the less likely we are to be prepared. 

We, as people of God, should act like we are living smack dab on top of the crossing of two major, imminently active, fault lines.  The kingdom of God is that close.  What does our ‘kit’ need to look like?

Christ calls us to prepare for his kingdom by being generous to people in need.  Not every needy person is poor — there are other kinds of needs besides money.  There are lonely people who need someone to talk to.  There are kids who need someone to coach their team and there are kids that need someone to teach or mentor them.  There are elderly people who need a ride to the doctor or to go shopping.  There are single parents who could use someone to help with their children now and then.

Getting ready doesn’t mean stocking up with things from the store.  Being prepared means opening our hearts – be willing to do good.  Those small acts of kindness are the sacrifices that please God.  They are expressions of the devotion of our hearts and obedient service.  This week begin to prepare your ‘kit’.  Examine your hearts and be willing to do good.  AMEN.

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  St. James Episcopal Church

 

The seventh parish of the Protestant Episcopal Church,

St. James is the oldest Episcopal church building in California.

 

The first service conducted in the church building was held October 4, 1860.

The Rev. John G. Gassman,   originally from Norway, was appointed as

Vicar by The Rt. Rev. Wm. Ingraham Kip.

 St. James was consecrated by Bishop Kip, the first Episcopal Bishop of California, in 1870.

St. James, Sonora

 
 
 

Episcopal Shield

St. James Episcopal Church

  affectionately known as “The Red Church”

Festival Welcoming Eucharist 

 

September 8, 2013

4:00 p.m.

42 Snell Street

Sonora, CA 95370

  Map

 

St. James Episcopal Church welcomes all to our Festival Welcoming Eucharist, Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served after the service.

The entire community is welcome to come join in song, praise, and thanksgiving for St. James Episcopal Church in Sonora. Bishop Chet Talon will be our celebrant and preacher.
Come and bring friends to join us in our celebration!
 
 

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Sermon

Proper 13, Year C

 

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly.

 

Scenario #1

          This is from a children’s sermon several years ago.  Let’s play a game.  I’ll give you a scenario and ask you a question.  I’m going to give you a couple minutes to just think about your answer, or if you prefer you can grab a pen from the pew and jot notes on your bulletin.

   “Sit back, relax.  You’re at home and someone knocks on your door.  It’s a delivery person with a letter for you.  You open it and in it there is a cashier’s check in your name for $5,000,000.  It’s real and it is yours.  You sit down and begin to think about what you can do with all this money…”  (after some time)

Scenario #2

Ask for volunteers to demonstrate the game of abundance.  Looking for someone who likes stuffed animals…  Looking for someone who loves books…

One person (or myself) starts to give ‘things’ to one person.  Keep giving things until they can’t hold any more and either look for another solution or drop everything.  The object is to see if the receiver begins to share the things with others or tries to find a way to hold more or just starts dropping some to keep others.

          Okay, were there any surprises?  How do you feel when you contemplate having an extra 5 mil?  Would you change where you live?  What you drive?  Where did God fall on the list?  Was God on the list?  Since the beginning of time, man has given the first fruits back to God.  Period. In good years and bad years and not only out of abundance.

The man in today’s gospel story was getting too much produce from his fields.  He got so much that he couldn’t hold everything in his barn.  What else could he have done with the extra food?  What did he decide to do?

The man was very happy because he had so much food that now he could just relax and eat all he wanted.  But God laughs at him.  Man, you are going to die tonight, and who is going to enjoy all your food?  If the man knew he was going to die shortly, would he have done something different with his food?  What is Jesus trying to tell us about the “things” we have?    Jesus tells his friends later that they shouldn’t worry about what we’re going to eat or wear, because God knows that we need those things and will take care of us, or have someone else take care of us.  We just need to love God and try to be like Jesus.  Paul says in the letter he wrote to the Colossians that we are new and that Christ is in us.  Paul tells us to put our mind on heavenly things.  What should we do when we have more than we can use? (pause)

Is wealth bad?  That’s the question that comes to me when I read this type of lesson.  God doesn’t say we can’t have things.  Is wanting to have nice things contra to what God wants for me?  I think we need to be aware of how our possessions affect our thinking and being.  Even the commentaries that I read stress that this passage is not about having earthly things.  It’s about how we view our earthly possessions and our relationship to them that matters.  The story this morning is a reminder that the “fool leaves God out of the reckoning.”

          The other thought that struck me as I was preparing the abundance exercise, is that the lesson works for when we are having troubles heaped on us.  Suppose you aren’t receiving blessing after blessing, but trial after trial.  Do you try to manage them all yourself, holding them close?  Do you find a bigger place to store them in?  Do you share them with God or with others?  In either case, blessing or trial, the abundance is best shared.

This week I have another exercise for you.  Take a look at what you have.  Give away what you don’t or can’t use to someone who can.  Kids, you can do this too!  If you already have your earthly possessions in proper order, you might think about your time.  Remember the rich man was going to sit back, relax, eat, drink, and be merry.  Not that we don’t need to take time to sit and relax, to recharge our bodies and spirits, but there can be an excess there too.  Volunteers with time are always needed.

Perhaps the most important thing is to “put to death whatever in you is earthly – Paul cautions us to get rid of anger, wrath, malice, slander, and abusive language.”  These are not things to pass on, but to destroy, because if we keep them, they slowly destroy us.  We are new beings in Christ and therefore children of God.  As followers of Christ we do not store up treasure for ourselves; we are rich towards each other and God.  Amen.

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The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin
The Friday Reflection Title

August 9, 2013

 

Festival, Welcoming & Eucharist

 

At our Festival Welcoming Eucharist on July 28 at St. Paul’s in Bakersfield we had fourteen people confirmed or received into the Episcopal Church by Bishop Talton. Someone told me after the service that during the confirmations and receptions I had looked “like a proud papa.”

 

Undoubtedly I had-such a long, sometimes strange, occasionally haphazard and hazardous journey it had been: from ostracism, exclusion, exile, and wilderness to . . . what? Wholeness, joy, celebration? Certainly. Vindication? That, too. Let’s admit it. Or, perhaps for the sake of wholeness and (partial) full disclosure, let’s celebrate vindication, too-palpate it, diagnose, prescribe-then move on to better health.

 

I’m sure now that some of my pride that day came from the consecrated and consecrating scene before my eyes: here we were, in “old” St. Paul’s now new, in the still-resurrecting Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, with an African-American Bishop confirming and receiving fourteen new Episcopalians-and what a crew! A teenager, 20s, 30s, and 40s; Latino, black, white; lesbian, gay, straight. Who’d a thunk it?

 

Once upon a time at St. Paul’s, when the topic of the parish reaching out to minorities in its neighborhood came up, an older woman said, with some exasperation, “Why would those people want to come here!”

 

For a long time, what that woman said stood, for me, for everything that was wrong with “old” St. Paul’s-and I loved to repeat it, smugly, and with wounded self-satisfaction. But one time after I told the story, someone informed me about that woman’s story: how, white, she had grown up on the east side when it was still white-and then she had seen her safe “white” world overturned (she thought) by browns and blacks, people she couldn’t, or wouldn’t, understand and, so, came to fear. Barbarians who had overrun her home and neighborhood and were now pummeling her barred and barricaded church door.

 

At that moment a shock of recognition, to borrow from John Donne (“Holy Sonnet 14″), battered my heart, knocked; breathed, shone-and sought to mend. My new-found empathy for her, when I saw that her fear and my fears were siblings, members of a very large extended and internecine family, did not, of course, excuse her racism. But the shock I experienced that day still helps me to better understand my own blindness(es), insecurity, partiality, partialness, partisanship. Seeing, in Paul’s words (KJV) through my-and our-own glass darkly. In its own paradoxical, gospel way, that understanding, however glimmering, deserves its own festival, and welcome, and eucharist (thanksgiving).

 

The Rev. Dr. Tim Vivian,

St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

 

“Participating in God’s Reconciling Love”

From Commission on Ministry…

Ministry retreat 2013 Kaleidoscope Institute

Celebration of Ministry Conference

with the Rev. Eric Law

August 30- September 1, 2013

Register before August 15 to save $10

 

I was involved with the Kaleidoscope Program with Eric back around 2004.   I have taken two or three other courses with him since then.  Eric is quite insightful in his approach in offering material that can transform individuals and congregations.   I have begun reading his book Holy Currencies, and am finding that it gives some good language to connect many aspects of our common life and help energize the congregation for mission.  Eric is a gift to our diocese and I commend the Ministry Conference to everyone.  Hope to see y’all there.  -Fr. Paul Colbert, Diocese of San Joaquin 

We welcome The Rev. Eric Law as our conference leader for this year’s ministry event at ECCO. Eric Law is the Founder and Executive Director of the Kaleidoscope Institute, the mission of which is to create inclusive and sustainable churches and communities.

 

For more than 20 years, he has provided transformative and comprehensive training and resources for churches and ministries in all the major church denominations in the United State and Canada. He is the author of 7 books including The Wolf Shall Dwell with the Lamb and, his latest Holy Currencies: Six Blessings for Sustainable Missional Ministries. You may order Holy Currencies on the Amazon website, either in print form or download to your Kindle reader.

Remember, the Ministry Conferences are for everyone in our Diocese! Laity and clergy alike will learn a great deal about transforming the way we think about church, “from a static, linear and maintenance-type mode to a dynamic, circulatory, and rejuvenating vision of a church that interacts with the wider community…”

To read more about The Rev. Eric Law and the Kaleidoscope Institute, visit their website at www.kscopeinstitute.org.

To register for the Annual Celebration of Ministry Retreat click here for the registration form and click here for the Retreat Schedule Registration forms are due August 15, 2013.   There will be a $10 fee for late registration.

Focus on Anti-Racism Training …

Anti-Racism training is being offered in the Diocese of California on September 6 and 7, 2013. The sessions run from 10 am to 6 pm and attendance on both days is required for certification. The training will be held at Church of the Epiphany in San Carlos and the fee is $50 which includes lunch and training materials. You must register by September 1, 2013. More information can be found at www.diocal.org or by contacting Fr. Eric at ericm@diocal.org.

 

From the Diocesan Office…

 

  Dio seal

The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin

54th Annual Convention

October 25 and 26, 2013

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Modesto

Participating in God’s Reconciling Love

” So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled with your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.”

- Matthew 5:23-24

 

Registration Forms available on-line now at www.diosanjoaquin.org

From the Diocesan Office…

 

Please mark your calendar for these upcoming meetings and events. Watch for additional details in the Friday Reflection.

  • Commission on Ministry Meeting, August 10, 2013, 10:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Diocesan Council Teleconference Meeting, August 13, 2013, 6:00 p.m.
  • Sustainability Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 9:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Standing Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 11:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Celebration of Ministry Retreat, August 30 through September 1, 2013, ECCO
  • Festival Welcoming Eucharist, September 8, 2013, 4:00 p.m., St. James, Sonora
  • Northern Deanery Clericus, September 10, 2013, 11:00 a.m., St Matthew’s,San Andreas

 

Do you wish to see what else the Diocese is up to? Click here for The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin calendar.

 

From our Parishes and Missions…

  Christ the King

2nd Annual Raise the Roof

 

Saturday August 24, 2013

5:30 p.m.

(Doors will open at 5:00 p.m.)

6443 Estelle Avenue

Riverbank, CA 95367

Live Music

The Fun Strummers

Nails of Glory

and

BOOK

 

Comedy

1940s radio comedy form the evenings emcee Phil Schmitt

Italian catered dinner with dessert.

Wine glasses are available for $10 each and include two tickets for wine pours.

Tickets: Adults for $25.00

 Children 12 and under for $12.00

For more information  call Christ the King at 209-869-1075 or find us on Face book: Christ the King Community Episcopal Churc

Christian Rock Band BOOK

 

St. John the Bapisit Flyer

For our Diocesan Prayer Calendar…. click here

Bishop’s and Canon’s Calendars…

Bishop Talton’s Calendar

 

 

August 30- September 1    Ministry Conference, ECCO

 

September 8                       St. James, Sonora –  Welcoming Eucharist

 

September 15                     Church of the Saviour, Hanford

 

October 6                            St. Francis, Turlock

 

October 13                          St. Paul’s, Visalia

 

 

 

Canon Cullinane’s Calendar

 

 

August 11                    St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 18                    St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 25                    St. Paul’s Bakersfield

 

August 30-September 1      Ministry Conference, ECCO

 

Keep up to date on news and events with the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin website www.diosanjoaquin.orgClick here: Our Website
Contact Information
phone: 209-576-0104
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The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin
The Friday Reflection Title

August 2, 2013

 

During the week ending with Sunday 6/23/2013, while thinking about writing my sermon, I came upon an article on a site I visit and recommend, called; Anglicansonline.org. No, this is not one of those BLOGS that criticizes the Episcopal Church, but a truly Anglican site that has a definitely positive slant on the Episcopal Church, it calls itself : “The online centre (note spelling) of the Anglican/Episcopal World.”

 

Anyway, I found this story published there:

 

In the late nineteenth century (around 1886) an elderly historian went in search of anyone who had knownSamuel Provoost (1742-1815), first Bishop of New York, and third Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church. He was also the first chaplain of the US Senate and he an early graduate of Columbia College He was a self- effacing, learned, man of his times and circumstances, but more than a little reluctant, and a duller star than his contemporaries and successors: Samuel Seabury, John Henry Hobart, and Philander Chase.

He heard of an elderly woman (some 70 years after his death) who had been confirmed by Provoost. He arranged to meet her, to ask her what she remembered of him, and to learn anything possible from a first-person informant.

He took coal-fired, steam-powered trains and arrived at the home of the last-surviving confirmand of the Bishop. After social niceties and introductions, a conversation took place of which the only surviving parts are such as follow:

He: ‘What, precisely, do you remember about Bishop Provoost? Do you remember the sermon when he confirmed you? Was it during Morning Prayer or Evening Prayer? Was there a celebration of the Holy Communion? Do you remember his dress? Was there anyone else with him? Did he ever write you subsequently, or you him? What about the liturgical proceedings?’

She: [pause, v. long] ‘I remember … that he was very good at making fires. I think it was very warm in the church.’

He: ‘Do you remember anything else at all?’

She: [pause] ‘I remember … that the good bishop was very good at making the fire.’

A child of the early 1800s remembered at the end of the century of her birth that a ‘good bishop’ was ‘very good at making the fire’. She had no recollection of his doctrinal emphases or his habit; she doesn’t mention that he took or didn’t take snuff. She doesn’t mention if he was married, or knew Latin, or had ever been to England. But she remembered, at the very end of her own life, that one of the successors of the apostles was very good indeed at making the room more comfortable.

Though we strain ourselves at doctrinal precision, historical correctness, and good compliance with the apostle’s direction that all things should be done ‘decently and in order’, what we    would most like as our legacies, 70 years after our own deaths, is the clear recollection that we have made a room more comfortable.

In the course of our still-brief lives, we’ve known more than our share of ecclesiastics and church folk, and we’ve come to develop a keen sense of whose skills are where, whose soul is how oriented, or whose spiritual friendship and good company we want most. In our lay         portion of the apostolic succession, we do our best to praise the lives, loves, and skills of them who are good at ‘making the fire’. May their tribe flourish, and may we all feel their spiritual warmth.

(Anglicansonline.org, June 16, 2013- edited for space).

 

:::

 

In the OT reading from the book of Kings for that Sunday, Elijah had just killed “all the prophets”, the false prophets… the prophets supporting the king Ahab and his wife Jezebel – who you’ve all heard of, I’m sure. In keeping with her lovely disposition, she threatened death to Elijah. He was afraid!

 

He went out into the wilderness to talk to God…An angel came to him and said, “get up and eat” he/she didn’t say, get up and make a speech, or get up and pray or get up and read the scripture, but get up and eat!.. Otherwise the journey will be too much for you…

 

He continued to the cave at Horeb, the mount of God (good thing he ate, for it took him 40 days and 40 nights). Then the Word came to him and said that the Lord would pass by, but he was not in the wind, or the earthquake or the fire…he was in the silence…then the Voice of the Lord came to him and said, return on your way…no great speech, no liturgy, no frills, just return on your way…Food and drink, rest, follow the way of the Lord, experience his voice in the small silences, then continue on your way in the wilderness…continue in your work….

 

In the gospel appointed that day Jesus said to the man cured of demons, no need to come with me…”return to your home and declare how much God has done for you”. Continue and witness in everyday things.

 

:::

 

It occurred to me that our challenge in our new places is, “What now?” And we sometimes think it must be a BIG THING… but I am reminded of all that we have been doing here at St Michael’s: cleaning, painting, gardening, moving furniture, figuring out the AC, dealing with the bank the waste company and the PG&E, and, that this is all ministry…and, like Samuel Provoost, just providing a comfortable place. And that could well be our legacy, just as all the highfalutin’ stuff like liturgy, theology, and policy, and may well be what people remember when we are long gone, that we were a comfortable place, not a small thing at all.

Linda Huggard+

 

For Article go to: www.Anglicansonline.org then archives then 6/16/13

“Participating in God’s Reconciling Love”

From Commission on Ministry…

Ministry retreat 2013 Kaleidoscope Institute

Celebration of Ministry Conference

with the Rev. Eric Law

August 30- September 1, 2013

Register today!

 

We welcome The Rev. Eric Law as our conference leader for this year’s ministry event at ECCO. Eric Law is the Founder and Executive Director of the Kaleidoscope Institute, the mission of which is to create inclusive and sustainable churches and communities.

 

For more than 20 years, he has provided transformative and comprehensive training and resources for churches and ministries in all the major church denominations in the United State and Canada. He is the author of 7 books including The Wolf Shall Dwell with the Lamb and, his latest Holy Currencies: Six Blessings for Sustainable Missional Ministries. You may order Holy Currencies on the Amazon website, either in print form or download to your Kindle reader.

Remember, the Ministry Conferences are for everyone in our Diocese! Laity and clergy alike will learn a great deal about transforming the way we think about church, “from a static, linear and maintenance-type mode to a dynamic, circulatory, and rejuvenating vision of a church that interacts with the wider community…”

To read more about The Rev. Eric Law and the Kaleidoscope Institute, visit their website at www.kscopeinstitute.org.

To register for the Annual Celebration of Ministry Retreat click here for the registration form and click here for the Retreat Schedule Registration forms are due August 15, 2013.   There will be a $10 fee for late registration.

 

Focus on Stewardship …

tens logo 

Good News! The Rev. Laurel Johnston, our stewardship speaker from our leadership day this past year and executive director of The Episcopal Network for Stewardship (TENS), has given the diocese a gift membership to TENS. Free stewardship materials are available by logging on to www.tens.org. Even more materials will be available to our congregations with this gift membership.

 

The diocese will be emailing the password for access to the additional resource materials to all clergy this coming week. Your stewardship chairperson may also have access to the password and additional resources by calling the diocesan office. These resources can prove invaluable as you plan your stewardship programs.

From the Diocesan Office…

 

  Dio seal

The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin

54th Annual Convention

October 25 and 26, 2013

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Modesto

Participating in God’s Reconciling Love

” So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled with your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.”

- Matthew 5:23-24

 

Registration Forms available on-line now at www.diosanjoaquin.org

 

Attention Parishes, Clergy, Delegates, Alternates, Diocesan Council, Standing Committee and Convention Arrangement Committee:

 

 

The 2013 Annual Convention Notification packets have been mailed and you should be receiving them by July 27, 2013. A Call to Convention email was also sent to you this week with all forms attached.

 

If you do not receive your notification packet, please contact Ellen Meyer at the diocesan office 209-576-0104 or emeyer@diosanjoaquin.org. Thank you.

 

From the Diocesan Office…

 

Please mark your calendar for these upcoming meetings and events. Watch for additional details in the Friday Reflection.

  • Diocesan Council Teleconference Meeting, August 13, 2013, 6:00 p.m.
  • Sustainability Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 9:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Standing Committee Meeting, August 17, 2013, 11:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Celebration of Ministry Retreat, August 30 through September 1, 2013, ECCO
  • Festival Welcoming Eucharist, September 8, 2013, 4:00 p.m., St. James, Sonora
  • Northern Deanery Clericus, September 10, 2013, 11:00 a.m., St Matthew’s,San Andreas

 

Do you wish to see what else the Diocese is up to? Click here for The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin calendar.

 

From our Parishes and Missions…

  Christ the King

2nd Annual Raise the Roof

 

Saturday August 24, 2013

5:30 p.m.

(Doors will open at 5:00 p.m.)

6443 Estelle Avenue

Riverbank, CA 95367

Live Music

The Fun Strummers

Nails of Glory

and

BOOK

 

Comedy

1940s radio comedy form the evenings emcee Phil Schmitt

Italian catered dinner with dessert.

Wine glasses are available for $10 each and include two tickets for wine pours.

Tickets: Adults for $25.00

 Children 12 and under for $12.00

For more information  call Christ the King at 209-869-1075 or find us on Face book: Christ the King Community Episcopal Churc

Christian Rock Band BOOK

 

For our Diocesan Prayer Calendar…. click here

Bishop’s and Canon’s Calendars…

Bishop Talton’s Calendar

 

 

August 30- September 1    Ministry Conference, ECCO

 

September 8                       St. James, Sonora –  Welcoming Eucharist

 

September 15                     Church of the Saviour, Hanford

 

October 6                            St. Francis, Turlock

 

October 13                          St. Paul’s, Visalia

 

 

 

Canon Cullinane’s Calendar

 

 

August 4                      St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 11                    St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 18                    St. Paul’s, Bakersfield

 

August 25                    St. Paul’s Bakersfield

 

August 30-September 1      Ministry Conference, ECCO

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