The Friday Reflection
July 31, 2020
The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

I recently finished The Heart of the Lion,a novelized biography of the great early 20th century film producer, Irving Thalberg (1889-1936). He produced such classics as the silent Ben-Hur (1925) with Ramon Navarro, Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) with Clark Gable and Charles Laughton, and Grand Hotel (1932) with a large cast of A-list stars including Joan Crawford and Great Garbo. In a span of thirteen years it is thought he produced some four hundred films, but to this day the exact number is uncertain because he refused to have his name appear in the credits. It only first appeared in his final film, The Good Earth, which was released posthumously in 1937. He once said, “credit you give yourself is not worth having”.
In considering the nature of leadership, Irving Thalberg and the attitude encapsulated in that quote immediately came to mind. There is no doubt that Thalberg was hard-working, sometimes to the detriment of his fragile health and his family life, yet it is also clear that he was able to see the craft and beauty of movie-making as something greater than himself. The film critic Carol Lejeune wrote about him: “He had the quality, rare among showmen, and precious among men, of standing back after an achievement and letting the other fellow take the credit…he never wanted to be known as the big promoter. He just saw a little farther than most of the others, and trusted in his vision, and worked like a laborer until it came true….What he also had was a great kindliness, a love for his workers, friends and audiences.” Without a doubt Thalberg had something of the genius about him, but he never tried to fool himself about his abilities or self-sufficiency, and while he got a lot of things right, he got a number quite, quite wrong; he didn’t initially believe that talking picture would take off, and he completely missed Clark Gable’s star quality on first meeting him. However, in each of those cases and in many others, when he realized he’d gotten the wrong end of the stick, as it were, he didn’t dig in his heels, but got on board with the judgement of others. In fact, his initial impressions notwithstanding, he produced the very first all-talking, all-singing Hollywood musical, The Broadway Melody (1927), and he is the one who groomed Clark Gable into “The King of Hollywood.” But, again, little of it was about him. It was about the work, about the workers, about the audiences. In 1929 he produced Hallellujah!, one of the first (if not the first) all-African-American film by a major studio and intended for a general audience. It was a huge risk on his part as well as the studio’s, and the film lost $120,000 (almost 2 million today). Nevertheless, he felt it an important film to make in part to present some very fine African-American performers to the general cinema-going public. Equally, toward the end of his life he produced one the first screen adaptations of Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet. That too lost money – almost one million dollars at the time – yet he still believed it worthwhile and an important artistic contribution. For Thalberg it was the project that mattered, not the accolades or the criticism.
I have come to admire Thalberg tremendously, and I think his attitudes about work and leadership and engagement translate into the lives of many of us.   If I were to write a book called All I Ever Needed to Learn about Leadership I Learned from Irving Thalberg I would list four things as essential: 1) It’s about the work, not about you. If you are looking for accolades and strokes, real leadership is probably not for you. 2) Don’t get caught up in either personal praise or criticism. Both pull you down in one way or another, while at the same time they are somehow both equally meaningless. It’s the fruit of the work that has any significance, and that’s not immediately discernible. For example, few people realized at the time the significance of Hallelujah! and its importance. 3) You’ll get a lot of things wrong, but once you realize you’re wrong get onto the right track…and wholeheartedly, with gusto. 4) And of course, “Credit you give yourself is not worth having.” Don’t ever buy your own publicity…no matter how “successful” you may be (or think you are). I try to remember these especially during our present trying times when I just might be a little more critical and self-conscious about my life and work, and little more inclined to lose objectivity and perspective. Ultimately, so little is actually about me. Thalberg’s life and outlook remind me of that.

In an increasingly polarized and fearful world, there are few places where people can have a reasonable and constructive dialogue about race relations and other important issues of our time. Summer Institute 2020 brings together spiritual leaders to provide insight and guidance and community leaders who want to see things differently to provide gracious time and place for truth-seeking dialogue that can achieve non-violent mutual understanding and learn tools to lead discussions that will lead to brave and gracious community.
From August 3 – 13 (excluding Saturday and Sunday), Institute participants will meet online from across the nation each day.
Find out more information here.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Contact Your Representative
Take initiative today and call, email, or write one of your state representatives regarding a creation care issue that you are passionate about. Positive environmental change starts with the individual and continues with larger scale change. You can contact your representative by calling the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. You can find out who your US Representative is here and your US Senators here.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 5 | 7:00 PM
Visalia – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 6 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Mary Meditation
August 12 | 6:30 PM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 12 | 7:00 PM
Taft – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 13 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 19 | 7:00 PM
Ridgecrest – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 20 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 26 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 27 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

Mary model of Christian life and believer in the promise of the Eternal Life
Join us on Facebook live for our monthly bilingual gathering on the study of Mary.
August 12 at 6:30 PM on Facebook live!

It is with great hope, anticipation, preparation, and prayer that we announce St. James Cathedral Sunday School for school-aged children kicks off Sunday, September 13th at 9:15AM on ZOOM.
During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to the entire Diocese. The first session, September 13th, is designed for the whole family to participate.
Registration is required and will open Saturday, August 1st and will be available on the St. James website. Registered students/families will receive the Zoom link and login information. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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Pastor Ryan Eikenbary is beginning his position as our Priest-In-Charge on August 1, 2020.

Beginning Sunday, August 2, 2020, our service will stream at 11:00 a.m.

We are making this change as Pastor Ryan will be doing an early service at Zion Lutheran Church, then Christian Education online, then our service. The time change makes it possible for him to do this.

Click the link below to view the guide for Sunday the 26th

Congregational Guide For Sunday July 26

For those of you who wish to join our Zoom coffee hour after the service, here is the link:

https://us04web.zoom.us/j/917842540

It will start immediately after the service

The Friday Reflection
July 24, 2020

Episocpal Church of the Saviour, Hanford, and St. James Lutheran Church, Hanford welcome Pastor Julie Kelly.
From Pastor Julie:
Joyous Greetings!
In the midst of challenging times, celebration and joy are more meaningful than ever.  I am filled with joy over joining in ministry at The Episcopal Church of the Saviour and fellow congregation, St James Lutheran Church in Hanford. The ECOS journey to this point has been filled with challenge and they have risen again and again to meet it with strength, passion, and joy. I believe our ministry together will be one where we will share in these gifts and find plentiful reason to celebrate the goodness of God in our community.
With so much to offer nearby, I look forward to making my home in nearby Visalia and spending many hours in Hanford and the surrounding communities. My family, (husband Lance, and children Brenden, Aurey, Nick, and Graham) and I enjoy many outdoor activities and we are looking forward to exploring the nearby areas and the secrets to be discovered. In the meantime, I intend to discover how to be a fiber artist in a yarn desert (ask me what that means!)
I am a cradle Lutheran but my parents left the church when I was young- it has been to my advantage to have lived so many places and worshipped in so many ways. I believe it is what gave me the courage to learn how to be a luther-palian/episco-theran and I look forward to learning with your support. I know this is an odd time to begin a relationship and we have some challenges ahead in finding unique ways to learn about one another, but I believe God is always giving us new and exciting opportunities. This is one. Thanks for the welcome and I look forward to meeting you when we are able to do so safely.

Congratulations on the ordination of Rev. Angela Lerena and Rev. Nelson Serrano Poveda
During these COVID19 days in which we find ourselves and through which we continue to navigate with care and caution, EDSJ has established protocols and guidelines endeavoring to keep one another safe.  Our protocols and guidelines are predicated on identifying that public health will always supersede economics. And communal, theological and mutual responsibility must take priority over individual rights.  This was no more evident than in our recent ordination of Angela Lerena and Nelson Povedo. Angela and Nelson were ordained to the priesthood. A significant portion of the service was pre-recorded and the parts which were live, occurred in a “masked and socially distanced” manner.  We continue our commitment to public safety and common good and we welcome and celebrate to the Holy Order of Priest, Angela and Nelson.
St. James Cathedral had some organizers of a car celebration! Check it out HERE.

Join us for the final week!
We are thankful for the leadership and guidance that Dain and Constance have given us. Join us for our last conversation on racism and white privilege with Dain and Constance for the time being! Our conversation has been framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]

For parishes interested in the work of Sacred Ground, please see this leaders video HERE.
If you do not know about Sacred Ground yet, please check out their website and all their resources for use in your own congregation.

In an increasingly polarized and fearful world, there are few places where people can have a reasonable and constructive dialogue about race relations and other important issues of our time. Summer Institute 2020 brings together spiritual leaders to provide insight and guidance and community leaders who want to see things differently to provide gracious time and place for truth-seeking dialogue that can achieve non-violent mutual understanding and learn tools to lead discussions that will lead to brave and gracious community.
From August 3 – 13 (excluding Saturday and Sunday), Institute participants will meet online from across the nation each day.
Find out more information here.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

The Establishment of the Creation Care Commission
Bishop David has appointed the following people to serve on the Creation Care Commission for EDSJ.
Rev. Terrance Goodpasture (St. James Cathedral, Fresno) [Chair]
Zoe Duke (St. James Cathedral, Fresno)
Suzanne Harvey (St. Raphael’s, Oakhurst)
Cynthia Thorburn (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Mike Dunham (St. Paul’s, Bakersfield)
Barbara Krengel (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
Eric Goosens (St. Paul’s, Modesto)
Zandy Adams (St. Matthew’s, San Andreas)
Rev. Bob Woods (St. Sherrian’s, Kernville)
Rev. Teri VanHuss (St. John’s, Tulare)
Rev. Peter Ackerman (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
The Creation Care Commission was established on June 26th by Bishop David in consultation with Diocesan Council. They were charge to  engage the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin in the work of restoring our relationship with the planet. The immediate concern is climate change and the responsibility of the church in addressing environmental destruction.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Watch a Documentary on Creation Care and/or Environmental Justice
Some examples include faith-based films such as Behold the Earth and Renewal, as well as other educational films such as The Story of Stuff.  Learn something new, and make a commitment to yourself to make a positive change in your life.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s, Stockton and Zion Lutheran Church, Stockton welcome Pastor Ryan Eikenbary.
Reverend Ryan Eikenbary is a northern California native who very much enjoys serving God in this wonderfully diverse and beautiful part of the world. He is a lifelong-student and after starting college in a music conservatory studying to be an Opera singer, felt the call of God and transferred to The Masters University, to earn a BA in Biblical Studies. His post-graduate studies include an MA in Church History from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and an MDiv from Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. His thesis in Church History is titled: And God Spoke in England: Puritan Iconoclasm and the Creation of the Verbal Icon.
He is passionate about the worship of our great God, living the gospel, and helping to form people in the Christian faith. Prior to attending seminary, he worked in college administration and post seminary worked both as a church administrator and as a nursing home chaplain until receiving his first call at Zion Lutheran Church in Stockton in October of 2016. As a pastor he thoroughly enjoys preaching and educating in a way that seeks to grow the life of faith of his congregation. He looks forward to joining with the people at the Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s just a few blocks down the street from Zion Lutheran.
When he is not at church, he enjoys reading, running, swimming, and working in his garden. Additionally, he teaches courses in ethics and religion in American at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. He has been married since 2012 and his spouse is a school administrator.  In 2016 they adopted their now 10-year-old son after having him as a foster child for a year. He and his spouse are now fostering a 6-year-old who they hope will be forever joining their family in the next year.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

It is with great hope, anticipation, preparation, and prayer that we announce St. James Cathedral Sunday School for school-aged children kicks off Sunday, September 13th at 9:15AM on ZOOM.
During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to the entire Diocese. The first session, September 13th, is designed for the whole family to participate.
Registration is required and will open Saturday, August 1st and will be available on the St. James website. Registered students/families will receive the Zoom link and login information. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
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Solar panels were installed at St Anne last week. They will help fulfill our commitment to be good stewards of the environment as well as keeping our utility costs down.

 

Click the link below to view the guide.

Congregational Guide For Sunday July 19

The Friday Reflection
July 17, 2020
Dean Ryan Newman

PANDEMIC AUDIOLOGY
These days, Bishop Rice often says that we find ourselves living amid two pandemics-both COVID-19 and racial injustice. The ills of these two, combined pandemics have heaped tremendous suffering and disparity upon our sisters and brothers in minority communities. Sadly, as these pandemics collide, our minority sisters and brothers, especially in the African American, Native American, and LatinX communities, are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The numbers are shocking and alarming!
Current research shows that minority communities in America continue to have significantly less access to healthcare. Their inability to obtain proper healthcare access is a significant reason for the disproportionate numbers of COVID-19 cases and death in minority communities. Also, for so many of our minority sisters and brother, their living and working conditions, due to long-standing, systematic racism, injustice, and disenfranchisement, predispose minorities to worst COVID-19 outcomes.
As of today, the demographic data collected by the COVID Racial Tracker by the Atlantic Monthly group shows that black people are dying at 2.5 times the rate of white people. Nearly 28,000 black lives have been lost to COVID-19-23% of all COVID-19 deaths where race is known.[i]
   
In California, Hispanic/LatinX account for 55% of all COVID-19 cases and 44% of all deaths in the state. In Wyoming, Native Americans make up only 2% of the state’s population, yet 45% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths are Native American. Maine has the nation’s worst COVID racial disparity in the country-blacks are contracting COVID-19 at a rate more than 20 times that of white residents.[ii]
As a Christian and a member of the human family, it is hard not to be angry and appalled by the disturbing disparity. Woefully, throughout our nation’s history, being a minority community member has always put one at a greater risk of severe injury and death. Today, the COVID-19 pandemic is another illustration that our sisters and brothers in minority communities are the most vulnerable and most in need of our love, support, and advocacy. Serving Christ in all persons, striving for justice and peace, and respecting the dignity of every human being means we cannot sit on the sidelines and watch our minority sisters and brothers suffer and die at the hands of an aggressive pandemic. We cannot allow others to be harmed or killed by another human’s action (or inaction).
One of the many prevailing themes from our conversations this month as a Diocese with Constance and Dain Perry is the need for white people to listen first before talking about race and racial reconciliation. As one of our clergy colleagues said, “Shut up! God gave you two ears and one mouth for a reason!” We need to stop and listen carefully to our sisters and brothers who are suffering overwhelmingly during both these pandemics. We need to hear their voice. We need to listen to their cries. We need to acknowledge our role in their suffering. We need to come to understand what it means “to be white!” This is not just important work-this is Baptismal work…this is also a Gospel mandate.
More than ever, we need to use our ears-and all our senses God has blessed us with. We will have plenty of time to speak in the future. If we listen carefully now, the story we will tell and what we will advocate for in the future, likely will be somewhat, if not radically, different than the one today. As Christians, and as leaders, we need to discover and rediscover the art of audiology if we are going to live into God’s theology!

[i] The Covid Racial Data Tracker by The Atlantic Monthly Group. https://covidtracking.com/race (July 16, 2020).
[ii] Portland Press Herald. “Maine has nation’s worst COVID-19 racial disparity.” Online edition. (June 21, 2020).

The ordination of The Rev. Angela and The Rev. Nelson to the Priesthood
Please join us on July 18th at 10:00 am on Facebook and YouTube.
We will have a Zoom reception for them following the service at 11:15 am. You can sign in HERE.
Service programs can be downloaded HERE.
Offering
In ordinations past, the passing of the plates is a time to help the newly ordained setup their discretionary fund to be used for their ministry. Since this ordination is online, we encourage you to give HERE and label as: ordination discretionary. All money collected will be split between them for their discretionary fund.
Cards for The Rev. Angela and The Rev. Nelson
If you would like to send cards to Angela or Nelson please send them to the Cathedral:
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726

The Establishment of the Creation Care Commission
Bishop David has appointed the following people to serve on the Creation Care Commission for EDSJ.
Rev. Terrance Goodpasture (St. James Cathedral, Fresno) [Chair]
Zoe Duke (St. James Cathedral, Fresno)
Suzanne Harvey (St. Raphael’s, Oakhurst)
Cynthia Thorburn (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Mike Dunham (St. Paul’s, Bakersfield)
Barbara Krengel (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
Eric Goosens (St. Paul’s, Modesto)
Zandy Adams (St. Matthew’s, San Andreas)
Rev. Bob Woods (St. Sherrian’s, Kernville)
Rev. Teri VanHuss (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Rev. Peter Ackerman (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
The Creation Care Commission was established on June 26th by Bishop David in consultation with Diocesan Council. They were charge to  engage the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin in the work of restoring our relationship with the planet. The immediate concern is climate change and the responsibility of the church in addressing environmental destruction.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Research How Your Community Regulates Waste
Each city or town has their own trash, recycling, and compost system.  What is the system where you live? Regulations change frequently so take some time today to update yourself.  Here are some questions for you to find the answers:
  • Does my town/city have recycling curbside pick up or do I take it to the recycling center?
  • What can I throw in the recycling bin?  Do I throw plastics, paper, glass, and aluminum together or do I separate them?
  • Does my city/town have a curbside composting program?
  • Can  I compost in my own backyard?

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Priesthood Ordination – Dcn. Nelson & Dcn. Angela
July 18 | 10:00 AM
11:15 AM | Zoom Reception for Rev. Nelson & Rev. Angela
Find all the information HERE
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE
July 21 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 22 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 23 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

You can still join!
We are thrilled to announce that Constance and Dain Perry will be hosting a conversation on racism and white privilege. Our conversation will be framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 22nd: Sections 6 & 7 [Chapters 29-40]
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]
Please RSVP to Canon Anna at canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org to receive the Zoom link.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
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Click the link below to view the guide

Congregational Guide For Sunday July 12

The Friday Reflection
July 10, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael

My sisters and brothers across EDSJ and the wider Episcopal Church,
We have been in “COVID” time for almost four months now. Original plans for retreats, meetings, and church events have been put on hold. There is no definitive date of when we will return to “normal” life, and that can be unsettling for everyone…myself included. As a leader, and just as Anna in general, I like to have a schedule so I know how to plan projects, establish goals and achieve desired outcomes. And my friends, not being able to plan in the ways I would like, has really tested my leadership skills. I am constantly learning and relearning what it means to be a leader in this really challenging time…and it’s not always been easy. Perhaps this is true for you as well. Perhaps you are learning and relearning how to be who you are, in all your varied roles, as well.
This month as a diocese, we are engaging in conversations with our friends, Dain and Constance Perry, around the book “Waking Up White”. It is our hope that we will become more conscious, more aware, of our privilege, as well as feel empowered to speak loving truth in the dismantling of racism and white supremacy in our communities. This is not easy work and there is no instruction manual to tell us what to do. Having said that, I recently completed the chapter on intention versus impact, and I’m finding that it is not only useful as we have conversations about racism, but it has lessons for leadership as well.
Intentions get me into all sorts of predicaments. I say something or respond to someone from what I think is a place of love or concern, and instead they hear something else. That “hearing something else” is the impact my statement has on them. In “Waking Up White” author Debby Irving gives the example of asking her husband if he’s emptied the dishwasher. Her intention is to find out if she can put a dirty dish in the washer, but what he heard was his wife nagging him. That’s intention vs impact.
While we can’t control what people hear when we speak to them, if we discover that the impact was not what was intended, a skilled leader can clarify, apologize, and work with the hearer to move forward in a positive direction. But my friends, this is really hard work. It means that as leaders we have to set aside our ego and defensiveness and instead listen deeply to the other. It means possibly having to adjust our expectations or intentions so that folks can work together cooperatively and compassionately. And it means being willing, as a leader, to take the time clarify, apologize for any offense (even if it’s unintentional), and then work together to move forward. Ultimately what I’m learning about intention vs impact is that the relationship and working together is equally if not more important than the outcome. Whew! That’s a lot of work!
Our communities are struggling these days with COVID, with systems of domination and oppression, with racism, with white supremacy, and with all the uncertainty that we are faced with on a daily basis. As leaders, both lay and clergy, we are being called to deep listening and compassionate response. It means we’ll need to monitor our intention vs impact in order to navigate these challenging times as we walk alongside one another.
Be well, stay safe, and stay healthy my friends,
Cn Anna

The latest information will be posted HERE.
Please join us on July 18th at 10:00 am on Facebook and YouTube for the ordination of Dcn. Angela and Dcn. Nelson to the priesthood.
We will have a Zoom reception for them following the service at 11:15 am. You can sign in HERE

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

Invest in a Reusable Water Bottle
Cut down on plastic by carrying your own water bottle with you. Preferably a reusable one made of aluminum rather than plastic. You will find that you save money by bringing your own water instead of buying new bottles every time you are thirsty.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary’s Face in Lament
July 12 | 6:30 PM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 15 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 16 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Council Meeting
July 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Priesthood Ordination – Dcn. Nelson & Dcn. Angela
July 18 | 10:00 AM
11:15 AM | Zoom Reception for Rev. Nelson & Rev. Angela
Find all the information HERE
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE
July 21 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 22 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 23 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

Join us on Sunday, July 12 at 6:30 pm for Mary’s Face in Latin America.

You can still join!
We are thrilled to announce that Constance and Dain Perry will be hosting a conversation on racism and white privilege. Our conversation will be framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 15th: Sections 4 & 5 [Chapters 17-28]
July 22nd: Sections 6 & 7 [Chapters 29-40]
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]
Please RSVP to Canon Anna at canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org to receive the Zoom link.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!