Click the link below to see Bishop David’s Pastoral Letter regarding the church and Covid 19.

Bishop Pastoral Letter re covid 19

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
The Friday Reflection
May 22, 2020
The Rev. Deacon Angela Lerena

What does it mean to be leaders in a pandemic?
I’m sure many of you have been hearing and seeing conversations, blogs, and sermons about what it means to be leaders in the midst of a pandemic. Over and over again we hear that being a leader in the midst of a pandemic means being non-anxious. Being a leader in the midst of a pandemic means being present. Being a leader in the midst of a pandemic means practicing self-care. Being a leader in the midst of a pandemic means finding creative ways to connect with others. Being a leader in the midst of a pandemic means taking more walks. And the list goes on and on.
I would argue, however, this is not actually any different than the very things we have always been called to be as leaders. We have always been called to be non-anxious, to be present, to practice self-care, to find creative ways to connect with others, and to take more walks. This work isn’t actually new. This is the ongoing work that leaders are, in fact, called to be and practice. So why has a world pandemic called all of this into the spotlight? Why do we have so many webinars suddenly reminding us to do each of these things? What if it is because we’re actually just really bad at doing all of those things all the time, and we can no longer fake it when our tightly controlled world is falling apart?
I’ve been spending a lot more time contemplating what it means to “return to normal.” As the quote at the beginning suggests, I actually wonder: What are the things we want to rush back to? Of course we want to foster relationships and community that many of us hold so dear. Of course we want to rush back to being able to embrace those that we love without fear of harming them. But what if we stop to think about all the things we maybe don’t need to rush back to.
Mother Earth has had a much needed break from some of the toxins we put into the air every day. We’ve had less flying, less driving, less consuming. We’ve walked a lot more, and cooked a lot more. We’ve taken naps in the middle of the day (at least I have!), and the world hasn’t collapsed. We’ve planted more gardens and veggies than years past (did you hear that seed companies are running out of seeds because home growers ordered more than any other year?). We’ve engaged our faith communities in completely new ways with online Bible studies, worship, and bingo nights, finding people who haven’t stepped foot into a church in years.
So what are the things you are itching to rush back to, that you might be called to leave in the past? What are the newly adopted, yet always called to be, things you will continue to do past these COVID days? How will you continue to be the leader that God calls each of us to be as we move forward? How will you live into being non-anxious, being present, practicing self-care, finding creative ways to connect with others? And what glorious naps will you take, and where might you find new places to walk?

       Latin@ Ministry Working Group
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin is looking for people interested in joining the Latin@ Ministry Working Group.
This group will work alongside the Latino Missioner to imagine and explore how Latino Ministry might happen throughout EDSJ. They will also support the ministries that the Latino Missioner has recently implemented, such as Devotionals about Virgin Mary in the Anglican/Episcopal tradition on the 12th of each month, and newly planned Latino presence for social media.
You do NOT need to speak Spanish in order to participate.
Please sign-up HERE and Deacon Nelson will be in touch shortly. Applications are due by the end of day June 3rd.

      COVID Update Letter from Bishop David
Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
I hope my words find you safe and well.  As I have communicated in my previous pastoral letters during these pandemic times of COVID-19, we have seen illnesses and deaths in an unprecedented manner.  At the time of writing this correspondence, close to 5 million cases worldwide have been reported and over 1.5 million cases in the US.  And we are approaching 325,000 deaths globally and shy of 92,000 deaths in our country.  I realize we see the very same statistical information each day through our various news streams.  My concern is that we may not pause enough during this informational storm and truly consider those who suffer from a debilitating and life threatening virus.  Equally, I’m afraid we may not reflect enough upon the people who are no longer with us and those who grieve them.  Please Church, do not get lost in the continuous numerical totals or the constant partisan politicizing or the ceaseless self-serving positioning.  This is a time, as it is in all times, when and where we remember who we are and to Whom we belong.  This is a time, as it is in all times, for us to be the Church.
In my last issued pastoral letter, I identified that we would continue to suspend public worship and public gatherings through May 24.  Again, after considerable thought and prayer and consulting with diocesan leadership, I am extending that date until such time when we can confidently resume our gatherings in a safe and healthy manner.  I realize in my two previous pastoral letters, I provided forecasted dates for potential reopening.  In this instance, I am electing to refrain from predicting a prospective date as I do not want to raise expectations unnecessarily regarding a resumption of public worship and gatherings.  I will say, we continue to rely upon science and the health-related data provided.  Moreover, we continue to rely upon our belief that we are guided by our commitment to public health and our faith-informed responsibility for one another.
Continue reading the letter HERE.

A message from the Latino Missioner, The Rev. Nelson Serrano Poveda, and SJRAISE.
Migrant friends in the Central Valley of California,
Because of the many organizations that we work with, we have received information on how you can apply to DRAI (Disaster Relief Assistance for Immigrants) funds. Remember that these resources are intended for UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS, who meet the requirements. PLEASE apply for this aid. Your information will only be taken into account for this purpose by the Non-Profit Organization, and at no time will it be forwarded to immigration institutions.
  1. In the counties of Alpine and Calaveras, you may contact the California Human Development Corporation at (707) 228-1338; More information on the website: www.californiahumandevelopment.org/
  2. In Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Tulare and Mono counties, may contact the United Farm Workers Foundation (UFWF) at (877) 527-6660; more information on the website: www.ufwfoundation.org
  3. In Mariposa, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Sutter and Tuolumne counties, you may contact the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation (CRLAF) at (877) 557-0521, For more information you can enter the website: www.crlaf.org/drai
  4. In Inyo County, you can contact TODEC Legal Center Perris, at (888) 863-3291, or access the website: www.TODEC.org
To continue reading, download the full article HERE, also in Spanish.

Use Green Transportation
How do you get from place to place?  Make a plan for how you can reduce your footprint. Does your city/town have public transportation? Are there places where you can walk or bike instead of drive? Are there places you can carpool? School, work, church, and small group meetings are great places to carpool. Make a commitment and plan to improve your carbon footprint.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Standing Committee Meeting
May 26 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
May 28 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 4 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Commission on Ministry – Discernment Conference
June 6 | 9:00 AM
ZOOM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

We need your help for Pentecost!
The Diocese is looking ahead to Pentecost and would love your participation in our May 31st service. This year for Pentecost, as we did in Holy Week, we are asking for picture submissions from the community. You have either participated in the past, or been recommended by Diocesan and Cathedral leadership!
What we’re looking for:
1. A picture of you and anyone in your home wearing red. Heat permitting it would be nice to see this picture taken outside but should definitely be taken in a well lit area.
2. Incorporating fire (i.e. a candle) is welcome but not necessary. Pets dressed in red are also welcome as they are part of our families.
This should be a fun activity and not stressful.
Because we would like plenty of time to gather the pictures and put the service together please have them uploaded to the link below by the end of day Tuesday, May 26th.

CANCELLED – RESCHEDULED 2021
Spanish Immersion at ECCO
If you have registered already, please look for an email from Deacon Angela in the next week about your refund.

Resources to Share

A Word from United Thank Offering
During this time of COVID-19, United Thank Offering (UTO) is asking that individuals and families consider that which they are thankful for, writing down one thing a day for the month, and at the end of the month, sharing the stories of what it meant to you to express gratitude during a difficult time.
Similarly, UTO is asking that you share your photos of sewing masks, the dust collecting on your car, the snacks you’ve put out for delivery persons or your window decorations for neighborhood children…in other words, how are you living, with gratitude, during COVID-19.
You can share your stories and photos on social media: #UTOgratitudechallenge
Finally, all money sent to UTO is used to support grants across The Episcopal Church, and our diocese has been the recipient of several of these grants.
We know that many among us are already feeling the financial effects of this pandemic and we want to remind you that UTO is first and foremost a gratitude practice. Therefore, if you (or people in your community) feel anxious about giving money, please encourage them to still give thanks. Write a small note and put it in your Blue Box, and then whenever you are able, give a thank offering after reflecting on these notes. Be sure to see the ways we continue to be blessed even when times are very hard.
Second, there are many ways to give to UTO that do not involve gathering at church. Everyone is encouraged to send their Spring Ingathering using one of the following methods:
* Text to give: To give via your phone, simply text INGATHER to 41444.
* Give online here: https://unitedthankoffering.com/give/
* Mail your check directly to the bank. Simply make the check out to UTO with Ingathering Diocese
of (name) in the memo line and mail it to: The United Thank Offering – DFMS – Protestant Episcopal
Church PO Box 958983 St. Louis MO 63195-8983
If you have questions about UTO, please contact Canon Anna (canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org).
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
The Friday Reflection
May 15, 2020
Dean Ryan Newman

HOMECOMING
Do you remember Enid Strict?
She was the “Church Lady” played by Dana Carvey on Saturday Night Live. Enid was tough on her guests, especially when it came to their sins-many ripped from the headlines of the day. Christianity and culture have had a complicated relationship. Still, people like Enid remind the Church that we can be our own worst enemy, especially when we exist in ivory towers secluded from the realities of society.
This past weekend Saturday Night Live again portrayed the Church. This time, SNL did a hilarious sketch about the “Zoom Church Experience.” It was funny because it was true-almost too real for those of us organizing and leading digital worship and meetings on Zoom. The pastor of Mount Methuselah Baptist Church struggles to preach over the “noise” of his congregants’ everyday lives zooming along in the digital world. Eventually, the pastor, so tired of the outside noise, says to his congregation, “The Lord wants everybody to click on that little microphone with the red line through it and where it says ‘mute’ hit ‘yes.’ Amen?!”
Zoom Church - SNL
Zoom Church – SNL
Hitting “mute” on the world is probably one of the gravest sins the Church can do, especially during this pandemic. However, we see it happen every day. Parts of our country and some of our most visible leaders are eagerly pushing for a “return to normal life.” A hurried return could and would mean more people become ill, and some will die as a direct result of the frantic pace to resume “normal life.”
It is one thing to see politicians and business leaders pushing for a speedy return. However, it is another thing to see “so-called” Christian leaders recklessly risking others’ lives by holding public services through the pandemic under the ruse of religious freedom. They might be a minority in the Christian narrative, but some faith leaders are demanding for their churches to be open, many who are denying the science behind the virus and its transmission. Throughout the country, there are churches even suing their state for the right to reopen their churches.
“God is commanding us not to give up the habit of meeting together,” said one pastor. He and I must be hearing different Gods! When we press “mute” on God’s call to love and care for others, people suffer, people die, and God’s heart breaks for all of humanity.
In the coming weeks, we expect to begin seeing an easing of gathering restrictions. States, including California, will allow churches to resume services in their sanctuaries under specific guidelines. Our natural reaction might be to rush over to the Church and jump head-first into the baptismal font (metaphorically, of course). We run the risk of saying: Let the people stampede into the pews, allow the choir to sing out an hour-long anthem, and most certainly feed us communion because we are starving for the bread of life. However, a hurried return will endanger lives, young and old, and could even lead to the death of the Church.
A rush back “into the normal” would require the Church to press mute on the world beyond our sanctuary walls. It would be a brazen and careless homecoming and a grave sin committed by the Church. I know under these circumstances that Ms. Enid Strict would not agree with an expedited return to the confines of the Church.
In our upcoming homecoming, whenever it may be, we are called to be thoughtful, meticulous, and ever mindful to care for those among us, especially those who are most vulnerable. Like the processional Cross entering the sanctuary, we are called to enter our houses of worship with steady, slow, and reverent steps. Like the most beautiful anthem at Christmas, our first note is not the crescendo; instead, we are called to be a community that gradually grows into the new normal following the pandemic.
We will return, we will sing, and we will be fed. We will be the community that once again gathers together for worship. Right now, the Church, more than ever, needs to suspend the urge to rely on Chronos (our timetable) and to entrust our future to Kairos (God’s timetable).

Amen?!

Deanery day’s will look a little different this spring. Instead of meeting in person, the Bishop and Canon will host all deanery meetings on a single day via Zoom.
Please note a slight change in who is required and who is advised to attend: Clergy and convention delegates are required to attend. Wardens and treasurers are highly advised to attend. Other leaders are welcome to join as well!
Southern Deanery | 9-11 AM
Central Deanery | 12-2 PM
Northern Deanery | 3-5 PM
Join Zoom Meeting Here

Meeting ID: 890 6175 3234
Password: 4147

One tap mobile
+14086380968,,89061753234# US (San Jose)
If you are unfamiliar with Zoom, and would like to test it out beforehand, please contact Dcn. Angela (dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org).

         
Traditionally church audits are due June 30th.
HOWEVER, due to COVID-19 and physical distancing requirements, Bishop David has approved audits to be due September 30th.
If you are doing an internal audit, there is a requirement of 2 people to do the audit.
If you are doing an external audit, you may want to be in touch with the diocesan approved auditors to begin doing some of the work from a distance.
Deacon Terrance, Deacon Teri, & Rev. Linda Huggard are approved auditors.

Immigrant Day of Action 2020
will take place *digitally* on
Monday, May 11.
For years, Immigrant Day of Action has been a space to learn, advocate & build community with partners and friends from across the state united in our fight for immigrant rights.
As the  #COVID19  pandemic evolves, our work continues & we remain committed to fighting for a CA where we can all thrive. Join us!

Read a Book Concerning Creation Care

  • 50 Ways to Help Save the Earth: How You and Your Congregation Can Make a Difference by Rev. Rebecca Barnes of Presbyterian Church (USA).
  • Creation as Sacrament: Reflections on Ecology and Spirituality by Fr. John Chryssavgis of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  • Rooted and Rising: Voices of Courage in a Time of Climate Crisis by Rev. Dr. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas of the Episcopal Church and Rev. Dr. Leah Schade of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
  • Climate Church, Climate World: How People of Faith Must Work for Change by Rev. Jim Antal of the United Church of Christ

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Deanery Meetings
May 16
ZOOM
Deacon Fresh Start
May 18 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
May 19 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
May 21 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Council Meeting
May 21 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
School for Deacons
May 23
ZOOM
Standing Committee Meeting
May 26 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

Upcoming Event Information

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register below.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE

Resources to Share

A Word from United Thank Offering
During this time of COVID-19, United Thank Offering (UTO) is asking that individuals and families consider that which they are thankful for, writing down one thing a day for the month, and at the end of the month, sharing the stories of what it meant to you to express gratitude during a difficult time.
Similarly, UTO is asking that you share your photos of sewing masks, the dust collecting on your car, the snacks you’ve put out for delivery persons or your window decorations for neighborhood children…in other words, how are you living, with gratitude, during COVID-19.
You can share your stories and photos on social media: #UTOgratitudechallenge
Finally, all money sent to UTO is used to support grants across The Episcopal Church, and our diocese has been the recipient of several of these grants.
We know that many among us are already feeling the financial effects of this pandemic and we want to remind you that UTO is first and foremost a gratitude practice. Therefore, if you (or people in your community) feel anxious about giving money, please encourage them to still give thanks. Write a small note and put it in your Blue Box, and then whenever you are able, give a thank offering after reflecting on these notes. Be sure to see the ways we continue to be blessed even when times are very hard.
Second, there are many ways to give to UTO that do not involve gathering at church. Everyone is encouraged to send their Spring Ingathering using one of the following methods:
* Text to give: To give via your phone, simply text INGATHER to 41444.
* Give online here: https://unitedthankoffering.com/give/
* Mail your check directly to the bank. Simply make the check out to UTO with Ingathering Diocese
of (name) in the memo line and mail it to: The United Thank Offering – DFMS – Protestant Episcopal
Church PO Box 958983 St. Louis MO 63195-8983
If you have questions about UTO, please contact Canon Anna (canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org).
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
The Friday Reflection
May 1, 2020
Bishop David Rice

Sisters and brothers of EDSJ,
On occasion, during these COVID-19 days, I have heard from some offering expressions of yearning concerning when we might gather again, in a non-virtual manner, for shared and public worship. And as I have received these correspondences, some will know that my responses have included my own expressions of yearning.
I’ve given a substantial amount of thought regarding what I miss most about gathering in our places of worship. So I thought I would take this opportunity to share some of those expressions of yearning.
I miss walking into the church in the processional and enjoying that enveloped feeling of anticipation that something extraordinary is about to occur.
I miss standing in the midst of the gathered community proclaiming words of encouragement, hope, grace, challenge and peace during the homily (This is typically my first opportunity to physically move closer to those gathered).
I miss offering exchanges of peace and reconciliation in moments of deep shalom.
I miss standing behind the altar and offering historic prayers which join us with People of God today and countless others who went before us.
I miss offering bread and wine and considering in that moment and in that exchange that God is doing more than I will ever comprehend.
And I miss walking out in the recessional and awaiting departure of others as we encounter the world from whence we came hopefully renewed, revitalized and re-created.
Sisters and Brothers, I miss all of that and much more. Mainly, I can say with absolute certainty, what I missed most of all, my deepest expression of yearning, is seeing you and being with you.
And I suspect and hope that particular expression of yearning holds true for you as well. And all of that leads me to suggest that one of the most important things to be done during these times of sheltering-in-place and offering care to the other by offering care to ourselves, is to contact one another with these words: “I want you to know, I really miss you!”
“Iron sharpens iron, and one person sharpens another.”  Proverbs 27:17
Blessings
+David

Deanery day’s will look a little different this spring. Instead of meeting in person, the Bishop and Canon will host all deanery meetings on a single day via Zoom.
Clergy, wardens, treasurers, and convention delegates are required to attend. Other leaders are welcome to join as well!
Southern Deanery | 9-11 AM
Central Deanery | 12-2 PM
Northern Deanery | 3-5 PM
Join Zoom Meeting Here

Meeting ID: 890 6175 3234
Password: 4147

One tap mobile
+14086380968,,89061753234# US (San Jose)
If you are unfamiliar with Zoom, and would like to test it out beforehand, please contact Dcn. Angela (dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org).

We are looking for lay readers from across the Diocese. You just need a camera, smart phones work well! We will send you all the instructions, and details on how to submit them.
If you have NOT read for us before, please sign-up HERE.

Nuevo Amanecer, the Latino Hispanic Ministry Conference, has been not canceled because of Covid19. For this year, and for the first time in the history of the Latino Hispanic Ministries of the Episcopal Church, this conference is being held virtually.
The Rev. Can. Anthony Guillen, Latino/Hispanic Missioner for the Episcopal Church, is inviting us in this video to be a part of Nuevo Amanecer: Check out his video HERE

Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry, will be with us during Nuevo Amanecer, inviting us to think and imagine a world where Love is the Way. The Rev. Glenda McQueen, and our Latino Missioner, The Rev. Deacon Nelson Serrano, will lead a workshop named: After Coronavirus – ABCD and reconstruction after the Pandemic.

Please plan to join this exciting event! Register now: HERE

        Postponement of Sabbatical
Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
I hope my words find you well as you continue to shelter-in-place and take of one another by taking care of yourselves.
One of the many rescheduled events during these COVID-19 days, is the Lambeth Conference in the U.K. As you know, Lambeth was scheduled for July, and following the conference, Tracy and I were scheduled for a four month sabbatical. As Lambeth has been postponed to 2021, we have decided to postpone our sabbatical as well.
So other than a holiday at some stage during the remainder of the year, we will be in country, more specifically, in the diocese for 2020.
As 2021 approaches, in due course, we will offer some information concerning our sabbatical plans.
In the meantime EDSJ, please continue to be careful and kind and wise in these challenging times.
Easter Blessings,
+David

Immigrant Day of Action 2020
will take place *digitally* on
Monday, May 11.
For years, Immigrant Day of Action has been a space to learn, advocate & build community with partners and friends from across the state united in our fight for immigrant rights.
As the  #COVID19  pandemic evolves, our work continues & we remain committed to fighting for a CA where we can all thrive. Join us!

Reuse.
You Don’t Have to Use an Item Just Once Right?
What disposable items in your life could you replace with a reusable option? Do you use cloth napkins or paper? Do you have a reusable water bottle or disposable? Do you use cleaning wipes or clothes? Do you pack your lunch in plastic bags or in reusable containers?

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
COM Meeting
May 5 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
May 7 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
School for Deacons
May 9
ZOOM
CA Day of of the Immigrant
May 11
Register: HERE
Nueva Amanecer
May 12-14 | 10 AM – 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Register: HERE
Clergy COVID Conference
May 14 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deanery Meetings
May 16
ZOOM
Deacon Fresh Start
May 18 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
May 19 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
May 21 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Council Meeting
May 21 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
School for Deacons
May 23
ZOOM
Standing Committee Meeting
May 26 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

Upcoming Event Information

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register blow.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
The Friday Reflection
April 24, 2020
Cathy Kline

Fear not; I have called you by name…
We are in the wonderful season of Easter and we can once again ring out the cry of, “Christ is Risen, The Lord is risen indeed, Alleluia” We can sing the Easter Hymns like the one used by our Cathedral’s worship on Sunday, “The strife is o’er, the battle is done”. Although it may not feel like the season with our limitations to our worshiping together in public and we may be feeling the battle isn’t over with the fear hanging over us of a worldwide pandemic but, I am comforted by these words knowing that every day is Easter. As Christians, this is the hope, the promise and the joy we are to live by.
As Christian leaders we are to take it a step farther and make it the story we are to tell and the assurance we are to lead by. I remember very clearly the moment God called me into ministry. I was not quite sure I heard it right. I really wanted to be like, the Old Testament prophet Isaiah when he heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” However, I think I was a bit more reluctant and fearful. It took much discernment and a great deal of prayer to finally answer that call but here I am.
So how is it exactly that we stand out in the crowd when there is no crowd to stand out in? How do we share the story and lead with the assurance of that promise when there are such difficulties surrounding us. I am reminded of Moses’ struggles with the Israelites and the fear they all had as well as the lack of trust this fear produced. It took great faith and leadership to stand up to people who were in fear for their lives as the army of Pharaoh was breathing down their backs. He boldly told these people “Do not be afraid. Stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which He will accomplish for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall see again no more forever. The Lord will fight for you, and you shall hold your peace.”
We too need not be afraid. It is hard in the midst of so much pain fear and troubles. Many families have loved ones who are very ill; many have lost some to this illness. There are many who have lost their jobs and have no idea what tomorrow will bring. We as Christian leaders need to be there for each and every one of these people. We need to listen and pray with them, we need to help support and feed them. We need to be there to pick up the pieces and help them get back up and keep on going. We also however sometimes need to stand still and be reassured of the salvation of the Lord, for as God said to Isaiah, “So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand”. Also we need to join together in celebration of Easter, being assured that the strife is over, the battle done, the victory of life is won; the song of triumph has begun Alleluia!

Bishop David Rice
Wednesday was a significant day in the life of EDSJ, The Episcopal Church and, the world in which we live. Firstly, we were one of the few dioceses to observe and celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day with the Diocesan Service.   And secondly, it was my pleasure to participate in a three person panel discussion through our Washington National Cathedral’s social platform,  Honest to God, regarding Earth Day and all things creation care.
I wish to extend my deepest gratitude and congratulations to Deacon Terrance Goodpasture, our Diocesan Creation Care Coordinator, Dean Ryan Newman, our Cathedral Dean, and Deacon Nelson Povedo, our Diocesan Latino Missioner and all other contributors for what was an extraordinary diocesan  observance and celebration of Earth Day.   If you didn’t have the opportunity to experience that service, you can find it on our Diocesan Webpage.
Equally, for those of you who were unable to tune in to Honest to God through Washington National Cathedral, that discussion is also available through the aforementioned link.
I want to offer my opening statement as a participant on the panel:
“There may be some out there participating in this social platform who are curious regarding why we are giving attention to Earth Day during these pandemic times in which we find ourselves. We have heard now for a considerable amount of time the importance of flattening the curve of COVID-19 through social distancing, sheltering in place, wearing masks and gloves and the like.  We are, without a doubt in a crisis.  There is another crisis albeit perhaps traveling at a somewhat slower pace and that is the climate crisis. Global change is generally slower and somewhat more multifaceted than this pandemic but it is equally unstoppable unless we make changes. We must flatten the curve regarding our consumption of resources.”
Interestingly, and I hope, not surprisingly enough, we spent the first few moments in our panel discussion talking about the similarities and intersections between the crisis of COVID-19 and the crisis of climate.   And I think I recount accurately when I suggest that central to that part of our discussion was an acknowledgment of how our actions impact the entire world around us.   Thus, in the case of the pandemic, we observe the recommended precautions because we know that is the very best way of taking care of those around us. And in the case of creation, we know that there’s a direct correlation between how we treat our world as a gift, thereby offering it care rather than consuming it, and how we take care of others who share this gift.
And so, I would suggest the most profound similarity and intersection between the crises before us involves the undeniable manner in which we are connected to one another and how our actions so demonstratively impact the other.
I believe this global connectedness about which I write was beautifully reflected in and highlighted by the multi lingual Lord’s Prayer during our Diocesan Service this week.   In other words, as we pray these words in the languages of our hearts, we are profoundly reminded of how connected we are to one another and how responsible we are for one another.
Enjoy…
Easter Blessings
+David

Prayers of the People for use in Lent for immigration reform:
Risen Lord as we rejoice in your rising let us be mindful of those who have little to rejoice about. Let us pray for those who have little joy in their lives, those persecuted and alone.

Fend Off “Energy Vampires.”
Make sure to turn off and unplug items when they’re not in use. The socket draws electricity even when items are “turned off.” Some items that are often plugged-in when not in use are blow-dryers, phone chargers, electric kettles, and coffee pots. Other items that are often left in the “on” position when not in use are televisions, computers, and video game consoles. Using the battery-saving function on smart phones and computers helps them last longer, as well as saves energy. Perhaps you have a spare refrigerator you only need to run when you’re preparing to entertain guests. Look around your house and find what can be unplugged. You might be surprised by your energy savings!

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan Council & Standing Committee
April 25 | 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
ZOOM
Deacon’s Fresh Start
April 27 | 6:30 pm
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
April 30 | 12:30 pm
ZOOM
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

Upcoming Event Information

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register blow.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE

Online Series: Women Doctors of the Church
Join Jan Stegner at 11 AM on Tuesday’s, April 21-May 12 to learn and share about four remarkable women of the Church. The meetings will be offered via Zoom. Please register for each session at sandomino.org and you be sent the link to log-in for your mini-retreat experience.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

April 15, 2020
At the time of writing this correspondence, there have been over 2,000,000 cases of COVID-19 reported worldwide and over 130,000 deaths.  In the US, there have been well over 600,000 cases reported and over 26,000 deaths.  These are staggering, shocking and sobering numbers.  I know you are aware of these same numbers as we are perpetually confronted by them through our 24 hour news cycles.  Due to the fact that we are aware of these mounting numbers, each day, each moment, it is perhaps far too easy not to look beyond the numbers into the deeper reality they represent.  Family members, loved ones, mothers, fathers, grandparents, young and old alike, are no longer with us due to this insidious pandemic.  And the numbers of those struggling with the virus and who will struggle, is incomprehensible.  Again, in our worldwide human community, these are our family members and our loved ones about whom I write and for whom we continue to pray…
As a result of our experience over the last month and our continued responsibility for one another, again, after consultation with diocesan leaders, we will further our suspension of public worship and public gatherings until May 24.
The Friday Reflection
April 17, 2020
Rev. Peter Ackerman

God is in Our Adapting
The imagery offered through the Creation Story reminds us that God breathed out, and from that exhale the world, and all that is in it, came into being. The breath of creativity continues to bless us who remain faithfully in the flow of the Spirit. In His resurrection Jesus reminds us that God’s realm created an eternal continuation of that which used to conclude. All things are possible for us, in and through God.
John composes the Epistle used in our Daily Office this Sunday. Like any author, John has his own style. He lays out his thoughts differently than Paul, and does so without adding flowery introductions. This week he gets right to the point in his epistle by writing “we walk in the light when we have fellowship with one another.” God did not create us as solo acts, to live and serve as members of a larger body; the church. We are “church” when we gather in the light together, search together, praise and pray together, and yes, worship together.
This reminder may come at an awkward time; the idea of fellowship as how we have defined it; in church gatherings coffee hours, in person meetings, and more, are temporarily removed from us. This may lead some people astray, away from worship, prayer life, and community. This is what the Apostle might define as darkness. It is important for us to remember that we are never the sole owners and creators of our spiritual lives.
Orson Wellesonce commented about the work ethic ofthe artist Pablo Picasso. Welles mentioned that though someone might buy Picasso’s painting and hang it on his wall, in his private home, the artist still had the creative license to walk right into that dwelling and continue to work on it, perfect it, even alter it. We are in darkness if we leave out the creative breath offered to us each and every day, and in every situation, from God who enters into our realm always.
Magnificent is the work that our Diocese, Cathedral and individual parishes, along with their clergy and lay leaders are doing in these Covid-19 days to create, in this space of separation in which we temporarily reside. From streaming services, virtual meetings, digitally hosted coffee hours, and by using telephones again as means of two-way communication, we are entering into a time of adaptation for holy purposes. When creation, adaptation, and holiness come together, there is God.
John reminds us to walk in the light in fellowship with one another. May we continue to do so this season, and embrace the opportunities before us, the “alleluias,” and the fellowship anew. God is here, life is altered for a moment, and we still bask in the light. Yes, my friends, “alleluia,” and happy Easter to all who live into the flow of God’s creation Spirit!

Earth Day Service
Earth Day is next Wednesday, April 22nd! Please join us for a special liturgy at 1 pm. This Diocesan wide liturgy features special prayers of the people, readings, and a homily that calls us to better serve our precious Earth.
Pleae join us via YouTube or Facebook at 1 pm.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | 5:00pm
The Reverend Canon Stephanie Spellers, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation, hosts a panel discussion on healing the earth in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of Earth Day. Reverend Traci Blackmon, Reverend Margaret Bullitt-Jonas and Bishop David Rice join Canon Spellers to remind us of the urgency of collective, inspired, and loving action to end the climate crisis.
Find out more HERE!

Prayers of the People for use in Lent for immigration reform:
Risen Lord as we rejoice in your rising let us be mindful of those who have little to rejoice about. Let us pray for those who have little joy in their lives, those persecuted and alone.

OBSERVE EARTH DAY ON APRIL 22
Earth Day 2020 will be celebrated on Wednesday, April 22! This year, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of this day. On Earth Day, enjoy the lovely scent of fresh air, clean up some litter, plant a tree, or simply enjoy companionship with nature! Walk through the woods in search of emerging wildflowers and green moss.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Commission on Ministry
April 18 | 10 am
ZOOM
SJRAISE
April 21 | 6:30 pm
ZOOM
Earth Day Diocesan Service
April 22 | 1:00 pm
ZOOM
National Cathedral Discussion Panel
April 22 | 5:00 pm
Clergy COVID Conference
April 23 | 12:30 pm
ZOOM
Diocesan Council
April 25 | 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
ZOOM
Standing Committee
April 25 | 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm
ZOOM
Deacon’s Fresh Start
April 27 | 6:30 pm
ZOOM
Clergy COVID Conference
April 30 | 12:30 pm
ZOOM
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

Upcoming Event Information

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register blow.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

The Friday Reflection
April 3, 2020
Rev. Michael Backlund

He called it sauntering. He hated the word, “hiking.” He didn’t march. He didn’t powerwalk. He didn’t run. He sauntered.
When we consider great leaders, a sauntering one doesn’t usually come to mind, but we’d be wrong about that. He was a great leader.
Tireless in his efforts to educate the public and convince politicians to conserve some remnant of our national wilderness, he caught the imagination of a president. In 1903, Teddy Roosevelt joined him for a three-day camping trip to Yosemite. Their first night together was spent beneath the Grizzly Giant in the Mariposa Grove, about which Roosevelt would later write, “The majestic trunks, beautiful in color and in symmetry, rose round us like the pillars of a mightier cathedral than ever was conceived even by the fervor of the Middle Ages.”
Two nights later sitting around a crackling campfire in the meadow by Bridalveil Fall, they talked, and talked some more. And in the end, a president became a follower, and convinced of its rightness, arranged the legislation needed to end California’s control of Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove and bring them under the care of Yosemite National Park in 1906 to be preserved and protected in perpetuity.
All of this – and more – by one who merely sauntered.
But saying “merely” isn’t right, is it? For you see, sauntering is not aimless walking around, but a holy undertaking. Sauntering harkens back to the name given to pilgrims on their way to the Holy Land, the “sainte-terre-ers.” And for him, sauntering in the Range of Light was a divine vocation, a pilgrimage into the very heart of things: “When we contemplate the whole globe as one great dewdrop, striped and dotted with continents and islands, flying through space with other stars all singing and shining together as one, the whole universe appears as an infinite storm of beauty.”
We Episcopalians, like this giant of a leader, are called and committed to Creation Care. A holy vocation. We stand on holy ground, if we but have eyes to see. God invites us to collaborate in the divine work of preserving and caring for our earthly paradise. Blessed are we beyond all telling to live so close to nature’s cathedrals within our own diocesan borders. In all our great and small ways, may we each commit to becoming a leader in caring for the divine magnificence we call, “The Creation.”
Dear God, help us to follow your holy one, John Muir, who said, “I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.” Show us, God, how to become saunterers. And as Annie Dillard advised, fashion us into those pilgrims of life who with each step of our left foot, shout, “Glory!” and with each step of our right foot, proclaim, “Amen!”

Holy Week Lineup

Sunday’s live-stream of the Diocesan Palm Sunday

The service bulletin will be available here by Saturday evening.

You can view Sunday’s service in two different ways:
YouTube | Many experienced this last week, and found that YouTube was the most reliable for many people.
Facebook | They can also find us on Facebook, but what we have found is that Facebook has been overloaded in a way that it was never meant to be by all the different people and places using it. YouTube does not have these same issue.
Join us either way, but know that both are available to you!
It will be live at 10 am.

Reenvisioning Blessing of the Palms
Traditionally during Palm Sunday, congregations gather outside their worship spaces to begin the service. Following a brief liturgy that includes the blessing of palm fronds and palm crosses, congregations trace Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem. The beginning of our Holy Week journey continues into our sacred spaces where we, the people of God, retell the story of our Lord’s Passion.
On this Sunday, April 5th, we will gather not at the doors of our physical worship spaces, but we will gather together along the road leading into Jerusalem. We will not only be witnesses to this drama, we will also be participants.
Prior to Sunday morning, we invite you to identify an object in your home that is or could be sacred to you. It can be a palm frond from your yard, but it also could be a cross, a picture, a drawing, a photo, or any other object dear to you. During this Palm Sunday liturgy, Bishop David will bless these items.
These sacred objects will be “our palm crosses” for this day, this Holy Week, and throughout the year. These will be the palms we lay at the feet of Jesus as he triumphantly enters Jerusalem. This week, these blessed items will serve as the liturgical appointments in the sanctuary of our homes. Ultimately, these sacred objects will serve as our substitute “palm crosses” for the year that are intended to remind us daily of Jesus’ sacrifice and unconditional love that is revealed to us once again this Holy Week.
For the traditionalist in the group who have access to palm fronds and want to make your own cross, here are two tutorials on how to make a palm cross; video tutorial and graphic tutorial.
For those who would like to make paper crosses you can find a helpful video tutorial HERE!

Spanish Noonday Reflections, 12:00 pm
Join us each day of Holy Week at 12:00 pm on Facebook for a Spanish reflection with Bishop David and Deacon Nelson!

Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday Daily Prayers
Monday, we will be hosting Morning Prayer Live at 7:30 am. It will continue to be available throughout the rest of the week.
Tuesday, we will host Evening Prayer live at 6:00 pm.
Wednesday, Compline will be hosted live at 8:00 pm.

Reaffirmation Service, Tuesday at 12:00 pm
We will be postponing our Chrism Mass and Dcn. Nelson’s Liturgy of Installation as Latino Missioner, but we will be holding a reaffirmation service. This service will include clergy’s reaffirmation of their ordination vows, and the laity will be asked to reaffirm their Baptismal Covenant.

Maundy Thursday Re-imagined, 6:00 pm
While Maundy Thursday has traditionally been a time of foot washing and stripping of the altar, this will look different during this time. We are working on a liturgy that offers video liturgy. We invite you to bring your soup, bread, and drink to our Agape Meal in the middle of the service so we can share together. You will then be invited to strip away your own altar at home.
More information to come on this service.

Overnight Prayer Vigil
End of Maundy Thursday Service until Stations of the Cross
While we won’t physically be in our Faith Communities this year for the overnight vigil following the Maundy Thursday service, we still can keep watch by setting aside one hour for meditation and prayer in the “virtual sanctuary” via ZOOM.
We invite you to choose an hour-long time slot in the overnight vigil. During the vigil, we invite you to quietly read and/or pray for that hour as we keep watch leading up to the Good Friday liturgy. The room will display imagery of a candlelit Cathedral.
The goal is to have at least one person observing the vigil at any given hour throughout the Watch.
To sign up, click on the link bellow. Please fill out the information and select a time(s) you are volunteering to maintain the vigil. More than one person can choose to hold the vigil each hour, but we definitely need at least one person. By Wednesday, April 8th, a follow up email will be sent to everyone who has volunteered to participate in the overnight vigil.
You can sign up here for a time slot.

Stations of the Cross and Good Friday, 12:00 pm
Stations will begin at noon and are designed to be done in your home. Stations of the cross will be a bilingual experience with the voices of many people coming together. We are also putting together a children’s stations experience!
The Good Friday liturgy will follow the Stations of the Cross around 1:30 pm and conclude near 3 pm.

Holy Saturday Liturgy, 9:00 am
Holy Saturday will begin with a live liturgy at 9:00 am

Easter Sunday, 10:00 am
Join us for Easter Sunday at 10:00 am! More details to follow.

An excerpt from The Immigrants Creed: “I believe in Jesus Christ, a displaced Galilean, who was born away from his people and his home, who fled his country with his parents when his life was in danger, and returning to his own country suffered the oppression of the tyrant Pontius Pilate, the servant of a foreign power who then was persecuted, beaten, and finally tortured, accused and condemned to death unjustly.”

Spring clean
Donate anything you haven’t worn, used, opened, or looked at in the past year to your local thrift store when they reopen.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Holy Week Schedule

Palm Sunday
April 5 | 10:00 AM
Morning Prayer
April 6 | 7:30 AM
Reaffirmation Service
April 7 | 12:00 PM
ZOOM & Live
Evening Prayer
April 7 | 6:00 PM
Compline
April 8 | 8:00 PM
Maundy Thursday
April 9 | 6:00 PM
Overnight Vigil
End of Maundy Thursday Service until Stations of the Cross
Sign-up HERE
Stations of the Cross & Good Friday
April 10 | 12:00 PM
Holy Saturday
April 12 | 9:00 AM
Easter Sunday
April 12 | 10:00 AM

Guest Writer

Normal by Rod Geist
“We can’t always know God’s plan.”  “Someday you’ll understand.”  “God has a purpose for everything.”  Trust me, if you know someone who is dealing with any kind of tragedy in their life, don’t give them these answers. They do not help at all.[i]

Continue reading more of Rod’s story and how it might apply to our COVID-19 days.

Face Mask Pattern

The newest CDC guidelines suggest that everyone wear a mask when they are out getting essential items. This helps to prevent any transmission that may be caused by our speech patterns. They do not recommend N95 masks for anyone except healthcare professionals, but homemade ones are effective and easy to make!

A Prayer in Times of a Pandemic
By Dcn. Tom Hampson
Loving God, throughout the Scriptures you call us to “Fear not!”, but these are troubling times for the hardiest souls. Give us courage to face the challenges of this new threat to your human family. Give us prudence, to do the necessary things to protect ourselves and others. Give us the clarity of vision to learn from this disease the lesson we are too prone to forget, that we are all connected, regardless of race or nationality or political persuasion. We pray for those who are struggling with this disease, that their health may be restored. We pray for medical personnel and first responders caring for those in need, that they remain healthy and unflagging in their life-saving work. And we pray for all those economically impacted, that they may find the resources to maintain themselves and their families. We ask all this, trusting in your abiding love, a love that even death cannot defeat. Amen.

Upcoming Event Information

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register blow.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
20. March 2020 · Comments Off · Categories: Uncategorized

Episcopal Church of St. Anne

The Fourth Sunday in Lent – Live Streaming

March 22, 2020  10:00 a.m.

Morning Prayer

Prelude          H #149

L:  Bless the Lord who forgives all our sins.

People:  His mercy endures for ever.

 The Decalogue

R:  Hear the commandments of God to his people:

I am the Lord your God who brought you out of bondage.  You shall have no other gods but me.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

DC:  You shall not make for yourself any idol.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

C:  You shall not invoke with malice the Name of the Lord your God.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

L:  Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

R:  Honor your father and your mother.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

DC:  You shall not commit murder.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

C:  You shall not commit adultery.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

L:  You shall not steal.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

R:  You shall not be a false witness.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

DC:  You shall not covet anything that belongs to your neighbor.
Amen. Lord have mercy.

C:  If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. But if we confess our sins, God, who is faithful and just, will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all
unrighteousness.    1 John 1:8, 9

 Deacon:  Let us confess our sins against God and our neighbor.

  (a period of silence)

Most merciful God, we confess that we have sinned against you in thought, word, and deed, by what we have done, and by what we have left undone.  We have not loved you with our whole heart; we have not loved our neighbors as ourselves.  We are truly sorry and we humbly repent.  For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ, have mercy on us and forgive us; that we may delight in your will, and walk in your ways, to the glory of your Name.  Amen.
   
L:  Almighty God have mercy on you, forgive you all your sins through our Lord Jesus Christ, strengthen you in all goodness, and by the power of the Holy Spirit keep you in eternal life. Amen.

 R:  Lord, open our lips.

And our mouth shall proclaim your praise.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: * as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever.  Amen. 

 The Lord is full of compassion and mercy: Come let us adore him.

 Jubilate 

1   Be joyful in the Lord, all you lands; * serve the Lord with gladness and come before his presence with a song.

2   Know this: The Lord himself is God; * he himself has made us, and we are his; we are his people and the sheep of his pasture.

3   Enter his gates with thanksgiving; go into his courts with praise; * give thanks to him and call upon his Name.

4   For the Lord is good; his mercy is everlasting; * and his faithfulness endures from age to age.

The Lord is full of compassion and mercy: Come let us adore him.

 R:  The psalm appointed for today is Psalm 23.  Let us say it together.

1   The LORD is my shepherd; * I shall not be in want.

2   He makes me lie down in green pastures * and leads me beside still waters.

3   He revives my soul * and guides me along right pathways for his Name’s sake.

4   Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil; * for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

5   You spread a table before me in the presence of those who trouble me; * you have anointed my head with oil, and my cup is running over.

6   Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, * and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: * as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever.  Amen.  Alleluia

 R:  The first reading is from First Samuel 16:1-13

The LORD said to Samuel, “How long will you grieve over Saul?  I have rejected him from being king over Israel.  Fill your horn with oil and set out; I will send you to Jesse the Bethlehemite, for I have provided for myself a king among his sons.”  Samuel said, “How can I go?  If Saul hears of it, he will kill me.”  And the LORD said, “Take a heifer with you, and say, ‘I have come to sacrifice to the LORD.’  Invite Jesse to the sacrifice, and I will show you what you shall do; and you shall anoint for me the one whom I name to you.”

Samuel did what the LORD commanded, and came to Bethlehem.  The elders of the city came to meet him trembling, and said, “Do you come peaceably?”  He said, “Peaceably; I have come to sacrifice to the LORD; sanctify yourselves and come with me to the sacrifice.”  And he sanctified Jesse and his sons and invited them to the sacrifice.  When they came, he looked on Eliab and thought, “Surely the LORD’s anointed is now before the LORD.”  But the LORD said to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for the LORD does not see as mortals see; they look on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart.”  Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass before Samuel. He said, “Neither has the LORD chosen this one.”  Then Jesse made Shammah pass by.  And he said, “Neither has the LORD chosen this one.”

Jesse made seven of his sons pass before Samuel, and Samuel said to Jesse, “The LORD has not chosen any of these.”  Samuel said to Jesse, “Are all your sons here?”  And he said, “There remains yet the youngest, but he is keeping the sheep.”  And Samuel said to Jesse, “Send and bring him; for we will not sit down until he comes here.”  He sent and brought him in.  Now he was ruddy, and had beautiful eyes, and was handsome.  The LORD said, “Rise and anoint him; for this is the one.”  Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the presence of his brothers; and the spirit of the LORD came mightily upon David from that day forward.  Samuel then set out and went to Ramah.

The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.

18    A Song to the Lamb              (All in unison)

Splendor and honor and kingly power are yours by right, O Lord our God,

For you created everything that is, and by your will they were created and have their being;

And yours by right, O Lamb that was slain, for with your blood you have redeemed for God,

From every family, language, people, and nation, a kingdom of priests to serve our God.

And so, to him who sits upon the throne, and to Christ the Lamb,

Be worship and praise, dominion and splendor, for ever and for evermore.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

 C:  The second reading is from Ephesians 5:8-14

For once you were darkness, but now in the Lord you are light.  Live as children of light — for the fruit of the light is found in all that is good and right and true.  Try to find out what is pleasing to the Lord.  Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them.  For it is shameful even to mention what such people do secretly; but everything exposed by the light becomes visible, for everything that becomes visible is light. Therefore it says, “Sleeper, awake! Rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.”      The Word of the Lord.

Thanks be to God.

16    The Song of Zechariah          (All in unison)

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; he has come to his people and set them free.

He has raised up for us a mighty savior, born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old, that he would save us from our enemies, from the hands of all who hate us.

He promised to show mercy to our fathers and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham, to set us free from the hands of our enemies,

Free to worship him without fear, holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High, for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,

To give his people knowledge of salvation by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God the dawn from on high shall break upon us,

To shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Deacon:  The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to John 9:1-41

Glory to you Lord Christ.

As he walked along, he saw a man blind from birth.  His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”  Jesus answered, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him.  We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work.  As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”  When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man’s eyes, saying to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which means Sent).

Then he went and washed and came back able to see.  The neighbors and those who had seen him before as a beggar began to ask, “Is this not the man who used to sit and beg?”  Some were saying, “It is he.” Others were saying, “No, but it is someone like him.”  He kept saying, “I am the man.”  But they kept asking him, “Then how were your eyes opened?”  He answered, “The man called Jesus made mud, spread it on my eyes, and said to me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’ Then I went and washed and received my sight.”  They said to him, “Where is he?” He said, “I do not know.”

They brought to the Pharisees the man who had formerly been blind.  Now it was a Sabbath day when Jesus made the mud and opened his eyes.  Then the Pharisees also began to ask him how he had received his sight.  He said to them, “He put mud on my eyes.  Then I washed, and now I see.”  Some of the Pharisees said, “How can a man who is a sinner perform such signs?”  And they were divided.  So they said again to the blind man, “What do you say about him?  It was your eyes he opened.”  He said, “He is a prophet.”  The Jews did not believe that he had been blind and had received his sight until they called the parents of the man who had received his sight and asked them, “Is this your son, who you say was born blind?  How then does he now see?”  His parents answered, “We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind; but we do not know how it is that now he sees, nor do we know who opened his eyes.  Ask him; he is of age.  He will speak for himself.”  His parents said this because they were afraid of the Jews; for the Jews had already agreed that anyone who confessed Jesus to be the Messiah would be put out of the synagogue.  Therefore his parents said, “He is of age; ask him.”  So for the second time they called the man who had been blind, and they said to him, “Give glory to God!  We know that this man is a sinner.”  He answered, “I do not know whether he is a sinner.  One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.”   They said to him, “What did he do to you?  How did he open your eyes?”  He answered them, “I have told you already, and you would not listen.  Why do you want to hear it again?  Do you also want to become his disciples?”  Then they reviled him, saying, “You are his disciple, but we are disciples of Moses.  We know that God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from.”  The man answered, “Here is an astonishing thing! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes.  We know that God does not listen to sinners, but he does listen to one who worships him and obeys his will.  Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a person born blind.  If this man were not from God, he could do nothing.”  They answered him, “You were born entirely in sins, and are you trying to teach us?” And they drove him out.  Jesus heard that they had driven him out, and when he found him, he said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”  He answered, “And who is he, sir? Tell me, so that I may believe in him.”  Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and the one speaking with you is he.”  He said, “Lord, I believe.” And he worshiped him.  Jesus said, “I came into this world for judgment so that those who do not see may see, and those who do see may become blind.”  Some of the Pharisees near him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not blind, are we”” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would not have sin.  But now that you say, ‘We see,’ your sin remains.”

The Gospel of the Lord.

Praise to you, Lord Christ.

 Sermon                                 Rev. Lyn

 Music    H#339

 The Nicene Creed

People together, all standing

We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God, eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, of one Being with the Father.  Through him all things were made.  For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven: by the power of the Holy Spirit he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary, and was made man.  For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried.
On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures; he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.  He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son.  With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.  He has spoken through the Prophets.  We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.  We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.  We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.   Amen.

R:   The Lord be with you.
And also with you.
R:   Let us pray.

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name.  Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread.  And forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.  And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.  AMEN.

Christian to bid the suffrages:

V.    Show us your mercy, O Lord;
R.    And grant us your salvation.
V.    Clothe your ministers with righteousness;
R.    Let your people sing with joy.
V.    Give peace, O Lord, in all the world;
R.    For only in you can we live in safety.

V.    Lord, keep this nation under your care;
R.    And guide us in the way of justice and truth.
V.    Let your way be known upon earth;
R.    Your saving health among all nations.
V.    Let not the needy, O Lord, be forgotten;
R.    Nor the hope of the poor be taken away.
V.    Create in us clean hearts, O God;
R.    And sustain us with your Holy Spirit.

C:  Collect of the Day: The Fourth Sunday in Lent

Gracious Father, whose blessed Son Jesus Christ came down from heaven to be the true bread which gives life to the world: Evermore give us this bread, that he may live in us, and we in him; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

L:  Prayer for Critically Ill or Facing Great Uncertainty

God of the present moment, God who in Jesus stills the storm and soothes the frantic heart; bring hope and courage to all who wait or work in uncertainty.  Bring hope that you will make them the equal of whatever lies ahead.  Bring them the courage to endure what cannot be avoided, for your will is health and wholeness; you are God and we need you.  Amen. 

R: A Collect for Guidance

Heavenly Father, in you we live and move and have our being: We humbly pray you so to guide and govern us by your Holy Spirit, that in all the cares and occupations of our life we may not forget you, but may remember that we are ever walking in your sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

DC:  Almighty and everlasting God, by whose Spirit the whole body of your faithful people is governed and sanctified: Receive our supplications and prayers which we offer before you for all members of your holy Church, that in their vocation and ministry they may truly and devoutly serve you; through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

ALL:  Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved Son that when two or three are gathered together in his Name you will be in the midst of them: Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come life everlasting.  Amen.

DC:      Let us bless the Lord.

            Thanks be to God.

 R:  Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine: Glory to him from generation to generation in the Church, and in Christ Jesus for ever and ever.   Amen.    (Ephesians 3:20, 21)

 Postlude Music                    H# 690

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Newly Designed Diocesan Website diosanjoaquin.org

March 13, 2020
Sisters and Brothers of The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin,
We know that we are all inundated with information and commentaries regarding COVID-19. And we also acknowledge concerns, regarding this virus, continue to mount. A number of Dioceses in The Episcopal Church have decided to suspend public worship over the next few weeks and to reassess the situation at that juncture. We need to advise you that we are considering the prospect of urging a practice of fasting of public worship for the sake of the most vulnerable in our midst in the Diocese.
The Friday Reflection
March 13, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael
https://www.cpg.org/global/online-resources/cartoons/
Dear friends of San Joaquin,
This spring I have the privilege of being the instructor for the Field Education Seminar in our local School for Deacons. We’ve just concluded reading the book “How Your Church Family Works: Understanding Congregations as Emotional Systems” by Peter Steinke on behalf of the Alban Institute. In part two of the text, Steinke focuses on the differences between “Mature” leaders and “Immature” leaders. The material was so rich that I felt it was important for all of us in the diocese, and especially those of us who serve in leadership positions, to take a look at these characteristics and do a little self-reflection.
So what is a “Mature” leader? According to Steinke, a “Mature” leader is comfortable with delegating and sharing responsibilities; their identity as a leader isn’t wrapped up in being the one person who can do all the work, but rather identifies the strengths and gifts of others and then shares with those people on their team. A “Mature” leader has appropriate boundaries, and focuses on their responsibilities and tasks, instead of micro-managing those on their team. Furthermore, a “Mature” leader has the resiliency to navigate change, accepts challenges, is open to growth, and manages their anxiety. “Mature” leaders are creative, have a sense of vision and direction, operates with integrity, and is not easily rattled by complaints or the anxiety of others.
Contrasting “Mature” leaders to “Immature” leaders, Steinke states that “Immature” leaders focus on short term fixes, are prone to rescuing/saving/fixing behaviors, and have a difficult time managing their boundaries. “Immature” leaders have trouble doing deeper level reconciliation work, so they often engage in being overly critical of others on their team or in leadership or quick fixes. Steinke goes further to state that “Immature” leaders tend to be defensive and rash, often blaming others while acting as victims. They have a hard time navigating change, so they become reactive and stagnate. When “Immature” leaders are really struggling, they can engage in accusations, demands, threats, and other antagonist behaviors.
As we discussed in class recently, our work as clergy and lay leaders is to help people grow. And what we know is that sometimes, growth is challenging and painful; it means letting go of old things-programs, systems, structures–to try something new. As a result, change and growth can be hindered by rumors, gossip, and secrets. Our choice as leaders is whether or not to confront those unhealthy behaviors.
What keeps us from confronting these behaviors (and believe me, we all do this in our different relationships, both in and outside the church)? We worry that we will hurt someone’s feelings, people will leave, and friendships will be shattered. However, the cost of not confronting those aforementioned behaviors is even worse than the fear we have of the confrontation! As Steinke states, “…criticizers and attackers, privilege seekers and power brokers, the least motivated and most recalcitrant are allowed to roam at will…[the behavior] is permitted and enabled…[and] we become organized around our anxiety, which drains our energies and resources” (119-120).
My friends, in these days of worry, of an unstable economy and viruses, of growing concern for the lack of safety nets for those on the margins, and our own internal-to-the-church changes, we as leaders are especially called to step up into being “Mature” leaders. We are called to be a non-anxious presence in our communities. We are called to confront unhealthy and toxic behavior. We are called to speak truth in love. Some days we’ll get it right, and some days we won’t. But let us stay focused on our call as found in Galatians (6:10), “So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all…especially to those who are of the household of faith.”
Be well,
Cn. Anna
Dcn. Nelson Is Here
Watch his debut Carthedra video!

Prayers of the People for use in Lent for immigration reform:
As our leaders ponder the future of our DACA recipients;
Let us pray for those leaders to make fair human decisions.
Lord as we walk with you on your journey to Jerusalem let us be mindful of others who face hate and danger every day; Let us pray for those fleeing their homelands and those who face hatred in any parts of the world.

Buy Fair Trade
Coffee, tea, chocolate, and bananas are now commonly available through Fair trade organizations. These co-ops ensure that products are produced sustainably and the farmers/laborers growing them are treated and paid fairly. Sure, you may pay a little more, but your purchase speaks volumes to those who take advantage of poor laborers and small foreign farmers. Go to www.equalexchange.org  or www.greenamerica.org. for more information and to order.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
SJRAISE
March 14 | 11:00 am
ZOOM
Diocesan Council
March 19 | 6:30 pm
ZOOM
Standing Committee
March 31 | 6:30 pm
ZOOM
Commission on Ministry
April 4 | 10:00 am
St. James Cathedral, Fresno
Chrism Mass & Dcn. Nelson’s Installation as Latino Missioner
April 7 | 10 am
St. James Episcopal Cathedral
Clergy wear red
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Register HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
St. Paul’s, Bakersfield Mariachi and Folklorico Showcase
March 27 | 6-9 pm
Check out the event HERE
St. Matthew’s, San Andreas Lenten Practice
EVERY FRIDAY IN LENT | 5 PM
Stations of the Cross
and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament
followed by a Soup Supper in the Parish Hall

Cancellations Around the Diocese
St. Pat’s at St. Matt’s
St. Matthew’s, San Andreas has decided to cancel their St. Pat’s at St. Matt’s event this year.

Upcoming Event Information

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registrations are due: April 10th
Register HERE

Spanish Immersion at ECCO
Come join us for a week of Spanish learning!
Join us for a week of learning to speak Spanish! You will have time to learn, bring home materials to keep learning, and enjoy many activities among colleagues and friends.
Prices include take home materials, week long materials, lodging, all meals, and activities!
Registration is due by June 10th. We need 25 people minimum to join us! Register blow.
If the program is canceled due to lack of participant registrations, all costs will be refunded.
However, if a participant cancels after the registration cut off date, costs cannot be refunded.
Registrations are due – June 10th
Register HERE
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Diocese of San
Joaquin
The Episcopal Church

The Friday Reflection Title
February 21, 2020
Rev. Lyn Morlan
Coming into the Diocese of San Joaquin in 2008, it was apparent that there had been a harmful style of leadership. There was one leader; everyone else was a follower. Dissenters or questioners were vilified and exiled. Lots of people had been wounded by this style. Two things I encountered: 1) there was a distrust of authority. It is extremely difficult to be a true leader of a faith community without trust. To this day, trust needs to be earned by a leader’s consistent actions and words. If you say one thing and do another, there will be resistance.
2) The leadership of the laity had been crushed to the detriment of congregational growth. This was apparent in the way even lay leaders sought power, as demonstrated by prior authority figures, instead of working to find new solutions or compromise. We need the laity to be responsible leaders in our churches.
Establishing lay leadership is not new to the Episcopal Church. I remember going to classes on leadership back in the 1980′s when I was a member of Christ the Lord Episcopal Church in Pinole. The Cursillo movement was dependent on lay leaders. Dave and I were active members of Cursillo in the East Bay. Lay leaders planned and carried out the 4-day weekend retreats. Yes, there were spiritual directors (I’ve done that too); they planned the liturgies and were there for pastoral care only.
As we begin the 13th year following the schism, let’s continue to strive for positive leadership. At St. Anne’s, time and energy has been spent on learning to trust each other. Jesus and his followers trusted each other; there is our positive role model. Being missional church, we are challenged to look beyond our church building to our community and to find God working there and – dare we say – join God in the work.
We all have experience with good and bad leaders in both secular and church settings. We are formed and learn from both. Let us strive to be responsible leaders. We are called to be involved. The ‘…’ gives each of us the freedom to discern how we will lead.
When Bishop David first came to the diocese, he asked the clergy to read “Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading” by Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky.   I recommend it for all of you who would be responsible leaders.

Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat at ECCO
Youth ages 13-18 are invited May 1-3 to the Episcopal Conference Center in Oakhurst for a weekend of fun activities, great food, and a chance to learn more about the Episcopal Church and what it means to be a Christian. If you’ve ever wanted to know how to talk to your friends about church, are interested in Social Justice, or just want to know why we do the things we do on Sunday mornings, this is the retreat to attend! You’ll have a choice of classes taught by both clergy and lay people ranging from Church History, to Music, to Creation Care and Social Justice. Bishop David Rice, Bishop of the Diocese of San Joaquin, will lead Evening prayer one night and Sunday morning Eucharist.
Registration will open in late February.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at:
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
 Submission requirements:

pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF

Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Joint Diocesan Council & Standing Committee Meeting
February 28-29
ECCO
Chrism Mass
April 7 | 10 am
St. James Episcopal Cathedral
Diocesan Recharge/Renew Youth Retreat
May 1-3
ECCO
Learn more HERE
Spanish Immersion Week
July 12-19
ECCO
Learn More HERE

   Events Around the Diocese
Public House Night
St. Anne’s, Stockton
February 21-22 | 6:00 – 8:30 pm
See more info HERE
St. Matthew’s, San Andreas Lenten Practice
EVERY FRIDAY IN LENT | 5 PM
Stations of the Cross
and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament
followed by a Soup Supper in the Parish Hall

DAY OF DISCERNMENT
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, March 7 from 9:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Modesto. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a
question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the
priesthood.
The cost of this event is $10 and includes morning snacks and lunch. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information and to register, please contact Deacon Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator:
dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.
Register online HERE

WAIT UNTIL THE LAUNDRY BASKET IS FULL TO WASH
Only do laundry when the load is full. Not only does this save water and electricity but it also will save you money and time. You can either wait until you have more items to wash, or combine your partial load with your family or housemates.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS