The Friday Reflection
September 18, 2020
Bishop David Rice

Vote faithfully
Vote faithfully from Bishop David

BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS
Sunday, October 4th – Participate virtually!
The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi commemorates the life of the patron saint of animals and the environment. It is fitting that the month-long “Season of Creation” that started on September 1st ends on October 4th, the Feast of St. Francis.
In remembrance of St. Francis’ love for all creatures, you and your pet(s) are invited to a “Virtual Blessing of the Animals” on the feast day, October 4th at 10:00AM.
To facilitate the virtual blessings, we are asking you to register your animal(s) for their blessing by clicking on the “register button” below. Please fill out the form and if at all possible, please submit a photo.
Participants do not need to be a member of the Cathedral Congregation–everyone is welcome to participate. Share the virtual blessing with your family, friends, and neighbors.
The registration deadline is Wednesday, September 30th at 5:00PM.
For the youngest among us who might not have a pet, but a favorite stuffed animal, they are welcome to register their furry friend for a blessing too.

Creation Care Commission Animators/Advocates
Have you wondered what an animator/advocate does for their local community when it comes to creation care? Bishop David and Deacon Terrance outline what those people do.
1. Engage with me as the commission chair and the Creation Commission in assisting you in your local community. For example: If a local community wants to do a community garden and needs help with how to start the Commission will help with resources.
2. Animate/Advocate for faith communities. Involves pulling down info from Friday Reflection, sharing commission updates, and having a voice on BC or vestry.
3. Survey and engage local community/vestry/clergy on what is already being done for creation care in homes and at the church. Discuss with community ideas for doing more. Such as, are you recycling, have you stopped using single-use plastic bottled water, etc. Use resources from Friday Reflection tips for places to start.

4. The Animator needs to be observant of ecological dates of note and let community know. For example, when is earth day, or Season of Creation. The Commission can help with resources.
5. Be the environmental prophet and pest. Be a pest and cajole, local communities to do something out of our faith framework in regards to creation care. If you need resources or ideas reach out to a member of the commission.
If you think you might be called to this ministry, please speak with your local clergy person or Deacon Terrance at deaconterrance@diosanjoaquin.org.
Download the full letter here.

Recycle toys, books, and clothes by donating them instead of throwing them out.
While many thrift stores were not taking donations many have resumed! Call your local thrift store and ask.

“All these years later, it’s those flowers – growing in pots, cans and left-over bottles of Coke or detergent – that has remained most vivid in my mind.  They capture for me the creativity, resilience and determination of migrants everywhere to find and fashion a better, more beautiful life for themselves and their family.” – The Rev. Tom Hampson, Deacon

.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
SJRAISE Planning Meeting
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 23 | 7:00 PM
Oakhurst – ZOOM
Clergy Gathering
September 24 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 24 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Nominations Due
September 28
Standing Committee
September 29 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 30 | 7:00 PM
Bakersfield – ZOOM

Creek Fire Update

All ECCO employees who live on site have evacuated to safer places, and ECCO has continued to provide and take care of them during this difficult time.
If you would like to make a donation for those affected by the Creek Fire you can do so online here:
Or you can mail checks to the Diocesan office:
EDSJ
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726
Memo: Creek Fire Disaster Assistance
Thank you to all who have donated! Your continued support and prayers are greatly appreciated.
To see the Diocesan news sent out about this on Sunday, September 6th, please click here.

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

Close-Up:Representation of
LGBT People in Cinema
Beginning September 15 (and scheduled for the second Tuesday of each month) St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, is hosting a series – via Zoom – called Close-Up and exploring the representation of LGBT people in cinema. Each session will feature a film (or occasionally a documentary) as the focus of a presentation and conversation. The featured film will be advertised well before the meeting with links to where it can be bought, rented and/or streamed.
The first meeting will center on the documentary The Celluloid Closet. Released in 1995 and based on Vito Russo’s 1981 book of the same name. The documentary uses Russo’s work and expands it with lectures and clip presentations detailing how LGBT characters have been portrayed in Hollywood films over the years. You can rent to stream the documentary via Amazon here. Two other documentaries that might be of interest are The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender and LGBT Film History: The Early Years (1910s-1920s). The latter is free on YouTube, and focuses primarily on German cinema. Nevertheless, it is incredibly well-made and highlights how German representation of LGBT people in film before the Second World War informed and influenced Hollywood movie makers.
Again, the first session will be Tuesday, September 15, and begins at 6.30pm. You can access the Zoom meeting via this link.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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A prayer on the anniversary of September 11th
O Almighty God, who brings good out of evil and turns even the wrath of your children towards your promised peace: Hear our prayers this day as we remember those of many nations and differing faiths whose lives were cut short by the fierce flames of anger and hatred. Hasten the time when the menace of war shall be removed. Cleanse both us and those perceived to be our enemies of all hatred and distrust. Pour out the spirit of peace on all the rulers of our world that we may be brought through strife to the lasting peace of the kingdom of your Son; Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen
The Friday Reflection
September 11, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael

This week I celebrate my fourth year here in EDSJ. Happy Anniversary friends!

If you remember when I first arrived, I started to ask folks “would your neighborhood/community notice if your church suddenly shut its doors”. I had asked this question of my own congregation in Eastern Oregon when I first started my walk with them, and it informed the way we did ministry both inside and outside our four walls, as well as our approach to stewardship, communications, and virtually everything else we did.
One of my first visitations in EDSJ, and one of the places I love to brag on, is St Andrew’s Taft. Many of you have heard me talk about the amazing work happening at Taft, but let’s refrain the story through the lens of leadership. What does it mean to be a leader in a congregation with no clergy person and very few Sunday worshippers, and a booming feeding ministry? What does it mean to be the church in that context? Would the neighborhood/community notice if the church suddenly shut its doors permanently?
On one of the virtual visitations that Bp David and I recently did, we had a chat with our friends at St Andrew’s and we saw, once again, the church being the church in the best ways possible. It’s messy, sometimes chaotic, sometimes exhausting, and totally life giving.
To be a leader in a congregation with no clergy person and few Sunday worshippers is in its own way, challenging. Many of you reading this article are in similar situations. It means that the laity have to all pull together to do the work…there are reports to complete, pastoral care issues to attend to, and just the day to day operation of a facility to manage. But throw a booming (and I do mean booming) feeding ministry on top of that in the midst of a global pandemic…WOW. So as I talked to my friends Carl and Shari about their 4 year feeding ministry anniversary, here’s what they had to share:
  1. Volunteers are key:   The volunteers required to make their operation work are part of what they’ve developed as the “Homeless Collective”. In other words, their volunteers are also recipients of the food ministry. They have their food handlers permits, they are mentored and trained by others, and now they freely and lovingly serve others.
  2. Start small and manageable but dream big: They started small with PB & J sandwiches in the church courtyard and continued dreaming big. Then they began gleaning from local markets and restaurants, which has evolved to receiving between 50-75,000 pounds of food per month. Now, they prepare daily meals and provide groceries to 2,271 families and 8,063 individuals per month (that number is as June).
  3. Patience and persistence are important: When they first opened their ministry, the local community was critical, believing that the ministry was enabling the homeless and making them dependent on “handouts”. However, over time (and especially since COVID started), St Andrews has helped to relieve some of the food insecurity in their community. They have also seen other positives such as a reduction in bug infestations, disease, violence and poor hygiene because people aren’t digging through dumpsters and trash for food. As Carl and Shari shared with the Bishop and I, “When people are deprived of basic needs like food, water, restrooms and shelter, they become like wild animals and do things we never thought possible. When people know there is plenty, there is no need of worry, and peace and calm becomes the new normal.” (I suspect we could all benefit from that lesson)
  4. LOVE is the answer: Their hope for the remainder of 2020 and 2021 is to continue to welcome people in LOVE without question or judgment. “The world is going through challenging times, however, here at St Andrews you can come in out of the storm and be comforted in the refuge of God.”
I know my friends, that the last six months have challenged all of us. We miss each other, we miss gathering in community, and we are missing our “normal” routines. But I hope you can find a ray of light and hope in the moments of darkness. For me, on this anniversary of my fourth year as your Canon, I can say with confidence that our neighborhoods and communities absolutely depend on us. We may not look like the church that we once were, we may be serving in different ways, but we are ESSENTIAL to the wellbeing of others. St Andrews in Taft is an example to us all.

God bless you, God be with you, and remember, YOU ARE LOVED.

Canon Anna

BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS
Sunday, October 4th – Participate virtually!
The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi commemorates the life of the patron saint of animals and the environment. It is fitting that the month-long “Season of Creation” that started on September 1st ends on October 4th, the Feast of St. Francis.
In remembrance of St. Francis’ love for all creatures, you and your pet(s) are invited to a “Virtual Blessing of the Animals” on the feast day, October 4th at 10:00AM.
To facilitate the virtual blessings, we are asking you to register your animal(s) for their blessing by clicking on the “register button” below. Please fill out the form and if at all possible, please submit a photo.
Participants do not need to be a member of the Cathedral Congregation–everyone is welcome to participate. Share the virtual blessing with your family, friends, and neighbors.
The registration deadline is Wednesday, September 30th at 5:00PM.
For the youngest among us who might not have a pet, but a favorite stuffed animal, they are welcome to register their furry friend for a blessing too.

Check Cabinets for Expired Medicine and Properly Dispose of Them
Avoid flushing medicines and other dangerous chemicals in the toilet or washing them down the sink. Instead, find your local med disposal location and take them there. This will help keep water clean and drug-free for other people drink and animals and plants to live in and consume.

“All these years later, it’s those flowers – growing in pots, cans and left-over bottles of Coke or detergent – that has remained most vivid in my mind.  They capture for me the creativity, resilience and determination of migrants everywhere to find and fashion a better, more beautiful life for themselves and their family.” – The Rev. Tom Hampson, Deacon

.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary Devotional
September 12 | 6:30 PM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Resolutions Due
September 14
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 16 | 7:00 PM
St. Anne’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan Council
September 17 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE Planning Meeting
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 23 | 7:00 PM
Oakhurst – ZOOM
Clergy Gathering
September 24 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 24 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Nominations Due
September 28
Standing Committee
September 29 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 30 | 7:00 PM
Bakersfield – ZOOM

Creek Fire Update

All ECCO employees who live on site have evacuated to safer places, and ECCO has continued to provide and take care of them during this difficult time.
If you would like to make a donation for those affected by the Creek Fire you can do so online here:
Or you can mail checks to the Diocesan office:
EDSJ
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726
Memo: Creek Fire Disaster Assistance
Thank you for your continued prayers during this time.
To see the Diocesan news sent out about this on Sunday, September 6th, please click here.

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Resolutions | September 14, 2020
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

The next Diocesan Mary devotional will be September 12th at 6:30 pm on Facebook Live.
A meditation on the experience of faith of Mary: an invitation to remain firm in faith, in moments of anguish, loneliness, or illness.

Close-Up:Representation of
LGBT People in Cinema
Beginning September 15 (and scheduled for the second Tuesday of each month) St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, is hosting a series – via Zoom – called Close-Up and exploring the representation of LGBT people in cinema. Each session will feature a film (or occasionally a documentary) as the focus of a presentation and conversation. The featured film will be advertised well before the meeting with links to where it can be bought, rented and/or streamed.
The first meeting will center on the documentary The Celluloid Closet. Released in 1995 and based on Vito Russo’s 1981 book of the same name. The documentary uses Russo’s work and expands it with lectures and clip presentations detailing how LGBT characters have been portrayed in Hollywood films over the years. You can rent to stream the documentary via Amazon here. Two other documentaries that might be of interest are The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender and LGBT Film History: The Early Years (1910s-1920s). The latter is free on YouTube, and focuses primarily on German cinema. Nevertheless, it is incredibly well-made and highlights how German representation of LGBT people in film before the Second World War informed and influenced Hollywood movie makers.
Again, the first session will be Tuesday, September 15, and begins at 6.30pm. You can access the Zoom meeting via this link.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches THIS SUNDAY, September 13th digitally. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
August 21, 2020
The Rev. Carolyn Woodall, Deacon

Leadership can take many forms, sometimes depending on the organization or group, the personality of the one leading, the circumstances, some combination of these factors and, I’m sure, some I didn’t think about.
I retired from the Navy and there, authority was strictly hierarchical. At Officer Candidate School we were taught that leadership meant exercising that authority fairly, impartially, and from afar – or from on high, if you prefer, although “on high” meant at least a couple of levels higher than you, and most often referred to the commanding officer. Orders were given and failure to obey them would have consequences. The primary concern was the mission. The welfare of the troops and morale were important, but always subordinate to the mission.
Many companies have a similar structure, except the bottom line is, all too often, the primary consideration and the lower echelon workers are expendable – there are always people looking for work, after all.
Sounds like a good model for the church – yes? Well, no – at least it should not be, although I’ve seen it from time to time, as I’m sure is the case for most of us. My own experience with this kind of leadership is that it is goal oriented, whether it be a military mission or maximizing profits. The people in the organization are a resource for obtaining a goal. In many churches there is still a goal. Butts in the pews and maximizing giving. Hmm, goals are nice, but those are the wrong goals.
When I think of good church leadership my mind immediately goes to the Gospel according to John, Chapter 13. That’s where we find the story of Jesus washing his disciples’ feet. Before the Feast of the Passover, during supper, Jesus got up, took off his outer robe, wrapped a towel around his waist and washed his disciples’ feet. The disciples were quite uncomfortable, and Peter expressed his discomfort at Jesus washing his feet. We all know how they felt. On Maundy Thursday we enact this act of Jesus. We are likely all uncomfortable with someone, often the clergy and lay leaders, washing our feet.
But Jesus had a lesson to teach. “After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, ‘Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord-and you are right, for that is what I am. So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.”
Jesus performed a simple act of service to his disciples, teaching them the importance of service to others. That’s our lesson for leadership – that we are all simply human and, as I’ve preached before, we are all valuable and important to God. And so it should be with us. Servant leadership has a goal, but it isn’t butts in the pews or maximizing giving. Our goal is to build up and support each other. We should lead with a towel around our waist, giving to those we lead that which they need to grow closer to God and to each other. Leadership should not consist of saying, “I want you to do this,” but to say, “How can I help?”
Deacon Carolyn Woodall

Observe the Season of Creation at your congregation!
The Season of Creation is celebrated every year by Christians around the world from September 1st, the Day of Prayer for Creation, and runs through October 4th, St. Francis Day. This year’s theme has been chosen to be Jubilee for the Earth: New Rhythms, New Hope. This is fitting given the major challenges of this Spring and Summer. Our hope is that every community in the diocese will celebrate the Season of Creation. More information including liturgical and formation resources as well as ways to register your events can be found here: https://seasonofcreation.org/
The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator and all creation through repenting, repairing, and rejoicing together. During the Season of Creation, we join our siblings in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.
This year, amid crises that have shaken our world, we’re awakened to the urgent need to heal our relationships with creation and each other. During the season this year, we enter a time of restoration and hope, a jubilee for our Earth, that requires radically new ways of living with creation.
The Season of Creation unites the world’s 2.2 billion Christians around one shared purpose. With so much injustice all around us, now is the time for Christians everywhere to come together and show the world how to love each other and creation.
The Episcopal church has also developed some good resources. There are resources on both the Season of Creation and St. Francis day, and their hope is that Episcopalians will take these and plan worship services, and other ways to celebrate the Season. Find these resources here: https://episcopalchurch.org/season-creation-and-st-francis-day-resources
Any questions about the Season of Creation or any of the available resources, please reach out to The Rev. Terrance Goodpasture at deaconterrance@diosanjoaquin.org.

Spend Time Outside This Week

Take some time to appreciate the outdoors this week. Go for a walk, play with your kids, play sports, or go to the park. Find ways to enjoy challenging weather such as snow, rain, and heat. Enjoy God’s beautiful creation.

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 25 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Resolutions | September 14, 2020
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

A Day of Discernment Coming:
Saturday, September 5, 2020
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, September 5 from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. via Zoom. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these
groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the priesthood.
There is no cost for this event. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information, please contact Rev. Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!
The Friday Reflection
August 14, 2020
The Rev. Gail Bernthal

“And Jesus said to them, ‘Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.’ Immediately they left their nets and followed him.” (Matthew 4:19-20)
This scene from Matthew’s Gospel takes us to the shore of the Sea of Galilee. As Peter and Andrew cast their fishing net into the sea, Jesus walks by and invites them to follow. With these few words, Jesus beckons them to leave behind the security of the life they know and follow Him, body, mind and spirit, into the unknown. Peter and Andrew are faced with a decision. Will they accept Jesus’ invitation? They immediately leave their nets and follow Him. They have heard about Jesus from John the Baptist. Jesus is different from any leader ever known. Many will come to call Him rabbi, not so much because of what he does, but because of who He is; a teacher, a servant and because of his love, both for those who follow Him and those who do not. Peter and Andrew trust Him. They do not know where Jesus is going, but they are ready to follow and offer Him their hearts.
What do we learn from Jesus about choosing a guide or a mentor? What do we learn about who to trust to lead us into places we would never have gone on our own, to help us be more than we ever would have been?
Jesus invited the disciples not only to listen to His words, but to come and see how He lived His life. The disciples saw in Jesus a life that was rooted in prayer. He often went away by Himself to pray, and everything He did was a reflection of prayer. He continually had one eye on His Father, the other on His companions.
Jesus loved His companions. He loved each of them for who they were, unique individuals with gifts and talents given by God. Jesus reminded them how important they were and what a different their lives could make.
Jesus told the truth, even when it was a truth no one wanted to hear. He told the disciples He must die on the cross in order for there to be new life for the world. “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” (John 15:13). He told this truth over and over.
He was a servant to His disciples. He knelt down and washed their dirty, calloused feet because He loved them, and as an example of how He wanted them to live their lives, as servants of each other.
Jesus was not ambitious in a worldly way. His desire was to do the will of His Father, and to turn the hearts of his followers toward God so they would in turn, keep one eye God and the other on their companions, and do even greater works than He.
Jesus teaches us to trust those who are genuine, wise, and honest. He teaches us to choose guides who are loving, humble, and who never lose sight of God, who is goodness and love.

MESSAGE FROM DEAN RYAN
August 13, 2020
Dear Cathedral Congregation of St. James,
In the beautiful passage from Ecclesiastes (3:1-8), we are reminded “for everything there is a season.” During the pandemic, we have had to adapt to new ways of living. It feels each new day is a new season-some days a time to weep and mourn, and other days a time to laugh and dance. Both the COVID-19 pandemic and my health scare this winter have been stark reminders of the fragility of life and the importance of being surrounded by family. These reminders have evolved into valuable lessons for our family. Ultimately, they have led us to make some significant, life-changing decisions for our long-term future as a family, especially as Erin and I look to raise Lexie in a complex and ever-changing world.
After a great deal of prayer, reflection, and conversation, I have made the very difficult decision to request of the Bishop, and the Bishop has consented, to my resignation as the Dean of St. James Cathedral effective October 16, 2020.
Erin, Lexie, and I will be relocating this November to Orange County (Southern California) to be closer to family. More than ever, due to some very recent developments with our aging parents, we are feeling called to be present with our parents who will need continuing support and care. This transition to our hometown will also allow Lexie to grow up surrounded by grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins-all who call Orange County home. This year’s events have made Erin and I aware that we deeply value Lexie being able to grow up in a “familial village.” Our move will be a significant leap of faith because neither Erin nor I have secured employment.
We leave with heavy hearts for the great work we have done together in two years and for the work left undone by our departure. St. James Cathedral and the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin have loved, cared for, and shaped our family and me in so many remarkable ways. We are forever grateful for the congregation’s goodness, generosity, and support.
During this COVID-19 period, it will be challenging to conclude our ministry and time together in the traditional manner. We are heartbroken that we will likely be unable to say our goodbyes within the Cathedral walls. However, as we have done so thoughtfully and creatively these past couple of months, we will develop an appropriate digital environment to conclude our time together and to say our goodbyes. Please know, we will carry our fond Cathedral memories with us wherever we go and in whatever we do.
“Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine.” (Ephesians 3:20)
Faithfully in Christ,
THE VERY REVEREND RYAN D. NEWMAN
DEAN

VIDEO MESSAGE FROM DEAN RYAN
Following up on his written announcement, Dean Ryan wanted to take a few moments to offer some additional and more personal words to the Cathedral Congregation. We invite you to view the video below.

Special Message from Dean Ryan
Special Message from Dean Ryan

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

EDSJ Virtual Bible Study
No Longer Strangers: Exploring Immigration Issues
The study is scheduled for consecutive Tuesdays in August (11th, 18th, 25th) and Tuesday, September 1st from 6-7 pm via Zoom. No Longer Strangers was developed by Forward Movement in conultation with staff from Episcopal Migrations Ministries and the Office of Government Relations of The Episcopal Church. It examines the complex issue of immigration and offers a chance for discussion of this topic from a Biblical perspective.

Please share the flyer with your congregation and invite them to participate in a Bible-based study about this important and timely issue. Each meeting will be co-facilitated by an EDSJ clergy person.

Spend Time Outside This Week

Take some time to appreciate the outdoors this week. Go for a walk, play with your kids, play sports, or go to the park. Find ways to enjoy challenging weather such as snow, rain, and heat. Enjoy God’s beautiful creation.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 18 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Creation Care Commission Animators/Advocates Gathering
August 18 | 7:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 19 | 7:00 PM
Ridgecrest – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 20 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 25 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 26 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 27 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Today is the day! Call to Convention will go out today!
Convention will be held November 13th and 14th on the EDSJ Convention Platform! Look for all the materials later today, and in the upcoming Friday Reflections.

A Day of Discernment Coming:
Saturday, September 5, 2020
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, September 5 from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. via Zoom. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these
groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the priesthood.
There is no cost for this event. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information, please contact Rev. Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
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Click the link below to view the Pastoral Letter.

Bishop David Pastoral Letter

The Friday Reflection
August 7, 2020
Toni Alvarez, Postulant from St. James Cathedral

My second year at Seminary of the Southwest begins on Monday August 31st. I will begin my Field Education assignment at Proyecto Santiago a Spanish-speaking mission at Saint James Episcopal Church in Austin. One could say that leadership is on my mind as I continue my formation for Holy Orders; one of the many things that I have learned is that as Christians and as Episcopalians we turn first to the Scriptures and to the example of our ancestors in the faith.
This coming Sunday’s lessons are a feast when we attend to them carefully, though what they teach us about leadership takes a bit of digging. This Sunday’s Gospel is the well-known story of Christ walking on water, and bidding Peter to join him found in Matthew chapter 14. We generally focus on Peter and the disciples in this story, but if we focus on Jesus here, we can learn a little about Jesus as a teacher and a leader.
Jesus sends his disciples on ahead of him, and he seeks solitude on a mountain. Here is the first lesson and probably the hardest for us, it definitely is for me: Christian leadership flows from prayer and contemplation. A specifically Christian leadership begins with our communion with the Triune God: Jesus will teach us the way if we listen to his Spirit.
Jesus then joins the disciples he sent ahead of him on the stormy sea. Jesus goes to where he is needed and provides the lesson that his disciples need. After contemplation comes right action; the Spirit of Christ sends us out to do the work that we are called to do, but only after we invite it to. As Saint Peter shows us. We often focus on Peter’s failure, but he is the first of the disciples to follow in Jesus’ steps. He calls on Jesus, and he steps out onto the waves; yes, he falters, and sinks but he cries out again, and again Jesus is true to his word and Peter is saved. Peter is starting to learn from his teacher and ours. Haltingly, by steps and with setbacks on the stormy sea he follows his teacher who is there to teach and to save.

A Pastoral Letter from Bishop David
Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
I am aware that pastoral letters from my hand and heart reached you in March (two separate), April (again, two), May and June.  The last correspondence came to you on June 2nd.  Immediately following the issuing of that pastoral letter, a diocesan working group, as you know, put together recommendations for diocesan guidelines and protocols in our response to the pandemic. Subsequently, those recommendations were discussed and endorsed by Diocesan Council and Standing Committee and then made available to you.
Since June’s pastoral letter, much has occurred. We spent the month of July in the largest social platform gathering in EDSJ’s history.  Over one hundred gathered for five consecutive Wednesdays exploring and discussing realities of white supremacy, entitlement and privilege. We discussed the prevalence of institutional racism in our midst and explored how we might move from complicity to holy action. I know you join with me in thanking Constance and Dain Perry for facilitating this important work with us.
Continue reading the letter HERE.

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

EDSJ Virtual Bible Study
No Longer Strangers: Exploring Immigration Issues
The study is scheduled for consecutive Tuesdays in August (11th, 18th, 25th) and Tuesday, September 1st from 6-7 pm via Zoom. No Longer Strangers was developed by Forward Movement in conultation with staff from Episcopal Migrations Ministries and the Office of Government Relations of The Episcopal Church. It examines the complex issue of immigration and offers a chance for discussion of this topic from a Biblical perspective.

Please share the flyer with your congregation and invite them to participate in a Bible-based study about this important and timely issue. Each meeting will be co-facilitated by an EDSJ clergy person.

Eat Less Plastic
Plastic, it is a major part of our lives. Our food is wrapped in it, toys are mad from it, it is found in devices we use everyday. But what you may not know is we are not only using plastics we are also ingesting them.
When you eat a bite of food or even take a sip of water you may be taking in tiny plastic particles along with it. Some researches believe the average person consumes about 5gm of plastic every 7 days. That’s like eating a credit card every week.
Humans have produced more than eight billion metric tons of plastic mostly since the 1950’s, and less than 10% of it has ever been recycled. There is so much plastic all around that we likely breath in tens of thousands of tiny plastic fragments or fibers every year.
Why is there so much plastic in our food, water, and the air around us? Plastics are very durable materials. Things made out of plastic can last quite a long time. However, they are not perfectly durable. Which means plastics can degrade through normal wear and tear. Just think about all the ways in which plastics are used. Everything from food containers to cell phone cases. The wear and tear from repetitive use can produce tiny microscopic fragments, which are called micro-plastics. Over time, these micro-plastics make their way into the environment. Like our lakes and rivers, the soil, and even into our oceans. These materials ultimately end up contaminating our food and water supply.
We don’t completely know for sure what effect ingesting all the micro-plastics might have on us. More research is needed to determine at what levels exposure becomes particularly dangerous. Experts recommend a precautionary approach.
Here are six tips you can do to reduce your exposure to micro plastics.
  1. Drink water from your tap. Drinking water is one of the biggest contributors to micro plastic ingestion. Bottled water has double the level of micro plastic level of tap water. So unless you know your tap water is unsafe, it is best to drink tap water instead of anything from a plastic bottle.
  2. Don’t heat food in plastic. Heated plastics have been known to leach chemicals into food. So, if you are warming up food use a pan in the oven or on the stove, or if you are microwaving use a glass container. You should also avoid putting plastics into your dishwasher.
  3. Avoid certain plastic food containers with known issues. The American Academy of Pediatrics has noted that plastic food containers with recycling codes 3, 6, and 7 may indicated the presence of some potentially harmful chemicals. You may want to avoid using containers that have those codes unless they are labeled bio-based or greenware.
  4. Eat fresh food. Fresh foods are less likely to expose you to concerning chemicals. Especially when compared to anything wrapped in plastic. Also, many food cans are lined with concerning chemicals.
  5. Minimize household dust. Dust in your house can contain chemicals that are found in plastic. So you should vacuum regularly.
  6. Thing big picture. Plastic production is expected to more than quadruple between 2015 and 2050, which means the amount of plastic contamination in the environment will rise along with it. Consumers should opt for products packaged in glass instead of plastic and use reusable non-plastic containers whenever possible.
If you follow these tips you can remove the amount of plastic in your life and in your body.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 11 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Mary Meditation
August 12 | 6:30 PM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 12 | 7:00 PM
Taft – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 13 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 18 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Creation Care Commission Animators/Advocates Gathering
August 18 | 7:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 19 | 7:00 PM
Ridgecrest – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 20 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 25 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 26 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 27 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

Mary model of Christian life and believer in the promise of the Eternal Life
Join us on Facebook live for our monthly bilingual gathering on the study of Mary.
August 12 at 6:30 PM on Facebook live!

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!
The Friday Reflection
July 31, 2020
The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

I recently finished The Heart of the Lion,a novelized biography of the great early 20th century film producer, Irving Thalberg (1889-1936). He produced such classics as the silent Ben-Hur (1925) with Ramon Navarro, Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) with Clark Gable and Charles Laughton, and Grand Hotel (1932) with a large cast of A-list stars including Joan Crawford and Great Garbo. In a span of thirteen years it is thought he produced some four hundred films, but to this day the exact number is uncertain because he refused to have his name appear in the credits. It only first appeared in his final film, The Good Earth, which was released posthumously in 1937. He once said, “credit you give yourself is not worth having”.
In considering the nature of leadership, Irving Thalberg and the attitude encapsulated in that quote immediately came to mind. There is no doubt that Thalberg was hard-working, sometimes to the detriment of his fragile health and his family life, yet it is also clear that he was able to see the craft and beauty of movie-making as something greater than himself. The film critic Carol Lejeune wrote about him: “He had the quality, rare among showmen, and precious among men, of standing back after an achievement and letting the other fellow take the credit…he never wanted to be known as the big promoter. He just saw a little farther than most of the others, and trusted in his vision, and worked like a laborer until it came true….What he also had was a great kindliness, a love for his workers, friends and audiences.” Without a doubt Thalberg had something of the genius about him, but he never tried to fool himself about his abilities or self-sufficiency, and while he got a lot of things right, he got a number quite, quite wrong; he didn’t initially believe that talking picture would take off, and he completely missed Clark Gable’s star quality on first meeting him. However, in each of those cases and in many others, when he realized he’d gotten the wrong end of the stick, as it were, he didn’t dig in his heels, but got on board with the judgement of others. In fact, his initial impressions notwithstanding, he produced the very first all-talking, all-singing Hollywood musical, The Broadway Melody (1927), and he is the one who groomed Clark Gable into “The King of Hollywood.” But, again, little of it was about him. It was about the work, about the workers, about the audiences. In 1929 he produced Hallellujah!, one of the first (if not the first) all-African-American film by a major studio and intended for a general audience. It was a huge risk on his part as well as the studio’s, and the film lost $120,000 (almost 2 million today). Nevertheless, he felt it an important film to make in part to present some very fine African-American performers to the general cinema-going public. Equally, toward the end of his life he produced one the first screen adaptations of Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet. That too lost money – almost one million dollars at the time – yet he still believed it worthwhile and an important artistic contribution. For Thalberg it was the project that mattered, not the accolades or the criticism.
I have come to admire Thalberg tremendously, and I think his attitudes about work and leadership and engagement translate into the lives of many of us.   If I were to write a book called All I Ever Needed to Learn about Leadership I Learned from Irving Thalberg I would list four things as essential: 1) It’s about the work, not about you. If you are looking for accolades and strokes, real leadership is probably not for you. 2) Don’t get caught up in either personal praise or criticism. Both pull you down in one way or another, while at the same time they are somehow both equally meaningless. It’s the fruit of the work that has any significance, and that’s not immediately discernible. For example, few people realized at the time the significance of Hallelujah! and its importance. 3) You’ll get a lot of things wrong, but once you realize you’re wrong get onto the right track…and wholeheartedly, with gusto. 4) And of course, “Credit you give yourself is not worth having.” Don’t ever buy your own publicity…no matter how “successful” you may be (or think you are). I try to remember these especially during our present trying times when I just might be a little more critical and self-conscious about my life and work, and little more inclined to lose objectivity and perspective. Ultimately, so little is actually about me. Thalberg’s life and outlook remind me of that.

In an increasingly polarized and fearful world, there are few places where people can have a reasonable and constructive dialogue about race relations and other important issues of our time. Summer Institute 2020 brings together spiritual leaders to provide insight and guidance and community leaders who want to see things differently to provide gracious time and place for truth-seeking dialogue that can achieve non-violent mutual understanding and learn tools to lead discussions that will lead to brave and gracious community.
From August 3 – 13 (excluding Saturday and Sunday), Institute participants will meet online from across the nation each day.
Find out more information here.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Contact Your Representative
Take initiative today and call, email, or write one of your state representatives regarding a creation care issue that you are passionate about. Positive environmental change starts with the individual and continues with larger scale change. You can contact your representative by calling the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. You can find out who your US Representative is here and your US Senators here.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 5 | 7:00 PM
Visalia – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 6 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Mary Meditation
August 12 | 6:30 PM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 12 | 7:00 PM
Taft – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 13 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 19 | 7:00 PM
Ridgecrest – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 20 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 26 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 27 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

Mary model of Christian life and believer in the promise of the Eternal Life
Join us on Facebook live for our monthly bilingual gathering on the study of Mary.
August 12 at 6:30 PM on Facebook live!

It is with great hope, anticipation, preparation, and prayer that we announce St. James Cathedral Sunday School for school-aged children kicks off Sunday, September 13th at 9:15AM on ZOOM.
During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to the entire Diocese. The first session, September 13th, is designed for the whole family to participate.
Registration is required and will open Saturday, August 1st and will be available on the St. James website. Registered students/families will receive the Zoom link and login information. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
July 24, 2020

Episocpal Church of the Saviour, Hanford, and St. James Lutheran Church, Hanford welcome Pastor Julie Kelly.
From Pastor Julie:
Joyous Greetings!
In the midst of challenging times, celebration and joy are more meaningful than ever.  I am filled with joy over joining in ministry at The Episcopal Church of the Saviour and fellow congregation, St James Lutheran Church in Hanford. The ECOS journey to this point has been filled with challenge and they have risen again and again to meet it with strength, passion, and joy. I believe our ministry together will be one where we will share in these gifts and find plentiful reason to celebrate the goodness of God in our community.
With so much to offer nearby, I look forward to making my home in nearby Visalia and spending many hours in Hanford and the surrounding communities. My family, (husband Lance, and children Brenden, Aurey, Nick, and Graham) and I enjoy many outdoor activities and we are looking forward to exploring the nearby areas and the secrets to be discovered. In the meantime, I intend to discover how to be a fiber artist in a yarn desert (ask me what that means!)
I am a cradle Lutheran but my parents left the church when I was young- it has been to my advantage to have lived so many places and worshipped in so many ways. I believe it is what gave me the courage to learn how to be a luther-palian/episco-theran and I look forward to learning with your support. I know this is an odd time to begin a relationship and we have some challenges ahead in finding unique ways to learn about one another, but I believe God is always giving us new and exciting opportunities. This is one. Thanks for the welcome and I look forward to meeting you when we are able to do so safely.

Congratulations on the ordination of Rev. Angela Lerena and Rev. Nelson Serrano Poveda
During these COVID19 days in which we find ourselves and through which we continue to navigate with care and caution, EDSJ has established protocols and guidelines endeavoring to keep one another safe.  Our protocols and guidelines are predicated on identifying that public health will always supersede economics. And communal, theological and mutual responsibility must take priority over individual rights.  This was no more evident than in our recent ordination of Angela Lerena and Nelson Povedo. Angela and Nelson were ordained to the priesthood. A significant portion of the service was pre-recorded and the parts which were live, occurred in a “masked and socially distanced” manner.  We continue our commitment to public safety and common good and we welcome and celebrate to the Holy Order of Priest, Angela and Nelson.
St. James Cathedral had some organizers of a car celebration! Check it out HERE.

Join us for the final week!
We are thankful for the leadership and guidance that Dain and Constance have given us. Join us for our last conversation on racism and white privilege with Dain and Constance for the time being! Our conversation has been framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]

For parishes interested in the work of Sacred Ground, please see this leaders video HERE.
If you do not know about Sacred Ground yet, please check out their website and all their resources for use in your own congregation.

In an increasingly polarized and fearful world, there are few places where people can have a reasonable and constructive dialogue about race relations and other important issues of our time. Summer Institute 2020 brings together spiritual leaders to provide insight and guidance and community leaders who want to see things differently to provide gracious time and place for truth-seeking dialogue that can achieve non-violent mutual understanding and learn tools to lead discussions that will lead to brave and gracious community.
From August 3 – 13 (excluding Saturday and Sunday), Institute participants will meet online from across the nation each day.
Find out more information here.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

The Establishment of the Creation Care Commission
Bishop David has appointed the following people to serve on the Creation Care Commission for EDSJ.
Rev. Terrance Goodpasture (St. James Cathedral, Fresno) [Chair]
Zoe Duke (St. James Cathedral, Fresno)
Suzanne Harvey (St. Raphael’s, Oakhurst)
Cynthia Thorburn (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Mike Dunham (St. Paul’s, Bakersfield)
Barbara Krengel (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
Eric Goosens (St. Paul’s, Modesto)
Zandy Adams (St. Matthew’s, San Andreas)
Rev. Bob Woods (St. Sherrian’s, Kernville)
Rev. Teri VanHuss (St. John’s, Tulare)
Rev. Peter Ackerman (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
The Creation Care Commission was established on June 26th by Bishop David in consultation with Diocesan Council. They were charge to  engage the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin in the work of restoring our relationship with the planet. The immediate concern is climate change and the responsibility of the church in addressing environmental destruction.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Watch a Documentary on Creation Care and/or Environmental Justice
Some examples include faith-based films such as Behold the Earth and Renewal, as well as other educational films such as The Story of Stuff.  Learn something new, and make a commitment to yourself to make a positive change in your life.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s, Stockton and Zion Lutheran Church, Stockton welcome Pastor Ryan Eikenbary.
Reverend Ryan Eikenbary is a northern California native who very much enjoys serving God in this wonderfully diverse and beautiful part of the world. He is a lifelong-student and after starting college in a music conservatory studying to be an Opera singer, felt the call of God and transferred to The Masters University, to earn a BA in Biblical Studies. His post-graduate studies include an MA in Church History from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and an MDiv from Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. His thesis in Church History is titled: And God Spoke in England: Puritan Iconoclasm and the Creation of the Verbal Icon.
He is passionate about the worship of our great God, living the gospel, and helping to form people in the Christian faith. Prior to attending seminary, he worked in college administration and post seminary worked both as a church administrator and as a nursing home chaplain until receiving his first call at Zion Lutheran Church in Stockton in October of 2016. As a pastor he thoroughly enjoys preaching and educating in a way that seeks to grow the life of faith of his congregation. He looks forward to joining with the people at the Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s just a few blocks down the street from Zion Lutheran.
When he is not at church, he enjoys reading, running, swimming, and working in his garden. Additionally, he teaches courses in ethics and religion in American at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. He has been married since 2012 and his spouse is a school administrator.  In 2016 they adopted their now 10-year-old son after having him as a foster child for a year. He and his spouse are now fostering a 6-year-old who they hope will be forever joining their family in the next year.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

It is with great hope, anticipation, preparation, and prayer that we announce St. James Cathedral Sunday School for school-aged children kicks off Sunday, September 13th at 9:15AM on ZOOM.
During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to the entire Diocese. The first session, September 13th, is designed for the whole family to participate.
Registration is required and will open Saturday, August 1st and will be available on the St. James website. Registered students/families will receive the Zoom link and login information. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
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The Friday Reflection
June 12, 2020
The Rev. John Shumaker

In Holy Baptism we are born-again of water and the Holy Spirit. God freely gives us that gift of the new birth, and not on any merit of our own. We are Sealed by the Holy Spirit, and marked as Christ’s own forever. We belong to Jesus.
Our response is to accept the grace that God has given to us, and in turn give ourselves to God as He has freely given Himself to us.
When we love someone, we get involved with them in many ways
….without communication, there is no relationship,
….without relationship, there is no love,
….without love, there is no trust.
As Christians, our relationship with Jesus Christ is the foundation of everything that we are, everything that we do, and everything that we hope to be.
Through the Waters of Regeneration in Holy Baptism, a relationship with God has begun, and it’s up to each one of us to do something about it.
You’ve probably heard someone say from time to time that in the church that it is the job of the ministers to minister, and the congregation to congregate.
….But who are the ministers of the Church?
The Book of Common Prayer teaches us that “the ministers of the Church are lay persons, bishops, priests, and deacons.”             (Catechism in The Book of Common Prayer, page 855)
As Christians we are all ministers of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Each one of us have our own gifts that God has given to us within the Body of Christ.
Someone once stated that “the mark of a disciple and the marks of a leader are very nearly identical.”
Holy Baptism is the beginning of where we fit in, in our relationship within The Body of Christ…..and it is a daily call to our dying and rising with Christ, and utilizing the gifts that God has given to us.
“The gifts He gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until all of us come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to maturity, to the measure of the full stature in Christ.”   (Ephesians 4:11-23 NRSV)
Peter states “I exhort the presbyters among you to tend the flock of God that is in our charge, exercising the oversight, not under compulsion but willingly as God would have you do it – not for sordid gain but eagerly. Do not lord it over those in your charge, but be examples to the flock.” (I Peter 1-3 NRSV)
Discipleship, and leadership, come from the same root:   Jesus Christ, and our daily commitment to Him.

Reopening Protocols for EDSJ
June 12, 2020
Dear Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
From the early beginnings of this horrific pandemic, I have been joined by diocesan staff, leaders and clergy colleagues in expressing the ways in which our responses amid this crisis speak of who we are and to WHOM we belong. We have consistently identified that this is yet another opportunity to grow deeper into the Beloved Community we are Called to be… This has been no more evident than the urging to take care of one another (the other) by taking care of ourselves. This other-self care has and continues to involve sheltering-in-place, wearing masks
and gloves and the like. We have been clear that our identity, our very reason to be, requires that we put public health over economics and theological-communal responsibility over individual rights. We have been clear that the need to reflect God in the Way of Love could not be more necessary than in our present contexts and circumstances. And we have been clear the Jesus Movement must inform what we do and how we do it during these days of COVID-19.
As we move closer to reopening, the aforementioned expression of identity and reflection of faith must not diminish. The guidelines before us are practical measures to ensure (to the extent we can) continued safety, health and wellness for all. When reopening occurs, we urge you to adhere to the guidelines and continue to frame them with words of faith, hope and love. We also encourage you to exercise caution, care and patience as we move into becoming church in yet
another way.
I wish to thank the contributors of our Diocesan Guidelines.
Participants on the Working Group were:
Canon Anna Carmichael (Dio Staff)
Ms. Barbara Vassell, Communicable Disease Manager, Stanislaus County Public Health
(Modesto)
Rev’d Luis Rodriguez (Bakersfield)
Rev’d Peter Ackerman (Lodi)
Rev’d Jim McDonald (Fresno)
Bishop David Rice (Dio Staff)
Blessings,
The Rt. Rev. David C. Rice
Where we are now:
EDSJ-Stage 1: Shelter In Place
O Virtual worship services

o Allow for no more than 3 people in the same space for filming of virtual worship; wearing of masks and 6ft of social distancing required

O All meetings/gatherings held virtually
O No in-person pastoral visits
O Limit feeding ministries to those which can follow safe protocols determined by health department.

To see the protocols for reopening, download the document below.
The PowerPoint presentation, as well as all these materials, will be available on the website by the end of day, June 12th.

“Dear God, let us not get so caught up in the fear and the chaos that we ignore the work we must do to meet the need. Turn our hearts toward the work we can do to help those kept in the shadows.  We may not be able to physically witness the situation, however, we can act.” — From Nancy Fitzgerald’s opening article

Check Your Car’s Tire Pressure

Properly inflated tires improve the car’s gas mileage. This will not only decrease your carbon emission but also save you money.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary Devotional, Bilingual
June 12 | 6:30 PM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Diversity of Bishops for a Diverse Church
June 17 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Sexuality and Gender Identity Diversity
June 24 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

TODAY!
Join Dcn. Nelson for the next devotional. This month will be focused on La Guadalupana: Her Story, Our Prayer. This is a bilingual event, live on Facebook.
Please join us, Friday, June 12th at 6:30 pm.

Northern California Vivian Traylor Chapter of UBE Statement on the Racism in the Church and a Call for Action

The Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE), whose members are of African descent, has fought to eradicate racism for over 200 years by encouraging the involvement of Black people in the total life of the Episcopal Church- on every level and in every way – stewardship, evangelism, education, leadership, governance and politics. We have stridently worked to dismantle power structures within the church and in society that have gone askew. Today as members of African descent in the Episcopal Church, we are deeply hurt, gravely offended and morally wounded by the unconscionable acts and senseless and horrific killings in the first half of 2020 of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery in addition to the many other Black and Brown people who have been unjustly victimized and murdered by the police; those who are charged with protecting, helping and serving our communities. It has been a collective awakening for us, the Church and society as a whole.

Download the statement from our friends in Northern California here.

Spam Emails!

   
Hi EDSJ!
Deacon Angela here. It looks like many of you have been receiving spam emails that appear to be from us. They are not, and since they don’t come from our email, there is unfortunately little we can do to stop it.
Things to look for in scam emails:
Our emails all end in diosanjoaquin.org. Hacked emails are not from our server.
The Bishops title simply says: Rev. David Rice. This is an incorrect title.
We ask you for gift cards of any sort. We will NEVER do that in an email.
We mention that is discreet. Again, that is a key word that this is likely fake.
We mention that we are in a prayer meeting. Well that doesn’t sounds like our type of language. ��
Watch out, please!
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
June 5, 2020
The Rev. Nick Lorenzetti

Our theme for this year’s articles in Friday Reflections begs the question: “What does Christian leadership look like during a crisis, such as a pandemic?” I believe there is truth to the claim by many who write about leadership that the call to leadership is often greatest in a crisis. Some would say that as goes the leadership, so goes the organization, even in a community such as a church, where hopefully Christ’s ministry is shared by all. We who are leaders must be alert and recognize that in these days of COVID-19, we must not retreat into chaos, and must certainly not retreat. I believe we are called to the moment and to display the behaviors that will help our diocese and our parishes to not only survive, but also to thrive in the aftermath.
This pandemic is the second crisis through which I have been a leader. The first was 9/11. I lived 90 miles from Manhattan during the time, and many in my town worked in NYC, had family in NYC, lost family and friends who were in the Trade Center. I have often reflected on what leadership in that disaster looked like, and have pondered what worked and what seemed not to work. The example of first-responders, clergy and lay leaders from almost all religions, “ordinary” folk from all areas around the country, etc., in retrospect taught me a lot about what servant leadership looks like.
Many have never been in the situation where we now find ourselves in the world. For my own prayer and understanding, I have, from various authors, come up with my personal list of what might be called the right behaviors of all kinds of leaders during a most difficult circumstance. Permit me to share them with you.
First, the effective leader in time of crisis is able to embrace reality, but project positivity. When times are tough, these kinds of leaders exude hope and optimism. They do not deny the seriousness of the moment; they acknowledge the suffering and loss of fellow human beings. But at the same time, they remain persons of vision, and they are able to strike a balance between reality and an improved future. The key word in this behavior is “hope.”
Second, the effective leader steps up to the proverbial plate in a crisis. They can help others recognize what needs to be done and what should not be done. They recognize that in times of crisis circumstances are volatile, and that they must be ready to adjust, balance, compromise, and change strategies and approaches as circumstances dictate. They understand that in crises, there are no “one size fits all” strategies.
Thirdly, the effective leader works hard at communication and relationships with her/his constituents. They are available and in touch with those whom they lead. They “care” about how those whom they serve are faring. They provide vital information when and as it becomes available. They speak the truth (such as, masks are important), but they layer the truth in encouragement, offering a reminder of the grace of the Divine.
Fourth, the effective leader focuses on the concerns of others above self. Simply put, this type of leader is skilled in empathy, and they exude an attitude of “how can I help you?”
Finally, they set example; they never ask anything of others that they are not willing to do. They remain as visible as possible, even if only virtually.
My sisters and brothers, there’s nothing new here. But I offer the fruits of my own study, prayer and reflection. May God continue to guide, direct and inspire us through this time of trial. Blessings and Peace.
Nick+

Pastoral Letter from Bishop David
June 2, 2020
Sisters and Brothers of EDSJ,
Yesterday, we paused and remained silent as we joined with millions in a National Day of Mourning. The intention of the day was to remember and grieve over 107,000 people no longer with us in the US and over 371,000 worldwide. And we are painfully aware that those numbers continue to increase daily.
And so, we remember and we grieve.
We have remained consistent in EDSJ regarding our response to this horrific pandemic. We have identified that public health will always take priority over economics. We have acknowledged that communal and theological responsibility will always supersede individual rights. And we have named that the very best way we can ensure care of and for one another is by taking care of ourselves through adherence to protocols and precautions.
And so, we remember and we grieve.
Tired and weary and grieving we are. We have been engulfed by COVID-19.  It has redefined and refigured most aspects of our lives. It has taken life from us, both literally and figuratively. And as a result, we will never be the same.
And so, we remember and we grieve.

“Dear God, let us not get so caught up in the fear and the chaos that we ignore the work we must do to meet the need. Turn our hearts toward the work we can do to help those kept in the shadows.  We may not be able to physically witness the situation, however, we can act.” — From Nancy Fitzgerald’s opening article

Use Gray Water
Gray water is water that has been used but is not necessarily contaminated.  You can use dish washing water, hand washing water, and cooking water to water plants. There are even systems you can install now that allow you to make use of gray water more effectively.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Wear Orange
June 5
Information below
Commission on Ministry with Standing Committee – Discernment Conference
June 6 | 9:00 AM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 9 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Racial Reconciliation
June 10 | 6:30 PM
Mary Devotional, Bilingual
June 12 | 6:30 PM
Deacon Fresh Start
June 15 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE
June 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Diversity of Bishops for a Diverse Church
June 17 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 18 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Pride Talk – Sexuality and Gender Identity Diversity
June 24 | 6:30 PM
Clergy COVID Conference
June 25 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
June 27
ZOOM

Upcoming Event Information

Wear Orange is Friday, June 5. This 6th National Gun Violence Awareness Day, organized by Everytown and community partners across the country, honors both those killed by gun violence and those who have survived it. Everytown is holding virtual events across the country June 5-7 to raise awareness for gun violence prevention.
Visit the Wear Orange Weekend website for tools to promote the weekend on social media, to find a virtual event in your community and to learn more. You can also share #WearOrange social media posts online on June 5 or wear orange during online worship services on Sunday, June 7 to help promote this virtual event.

Dear Episcopal Branch of the Jesus Movement,
We want justice – but what do we do now?
Join us for an Episcopal Justice Assembly on June 10th at 3 PM PST. Now is the time to build our collective energy and moral vision. We will learn from Episcopalians who are leaders in the fight for economic and racial justice, speaking to this moment of crisis. This is our opportunity to share experiences and reflect on our communal call to faithful action in anticipation of the National Poor People’s Digital March on Washington June 20th. Register here to join the June 10th Assembly.
We have a long-term crisis of poverty and inequality, and of a society that has long ignored the names – Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Christian Cooper, George Floyd, Freddy Gray – a crisis counts over 100,000 COVID victims, and looming crisis of 140 million people who just one more one emergency away from being poor.
The Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March on Washington will be a transformative digital event driving Jesus’ vision and justice’s agenda into the heart of the national narrative. In this unprecedented moment, Episcopalians are telling the truth about the dire failures of our society and sharing the key to real and lasting change that lies within our communities.
What you can do now:
1. Sign up to join us on 6/10 –  Register here to join the June 10th Assembly.

 

2. Register for the Poor People’s Campaign – The “Episcopalian” link here.
3. Share with your parish and diocese.

 

Join us in coming together in a bold new way on June 10.
In the love of Christ that brings justice for all,
Episcopal Presiding Bishop’s Office Department of Racial Reconciliation, Justice, and Creation Care.

Join Dcn. Nelson for the next devotional. This month will be focused on La Guadalupana: Her Story, Our Prayer. This is a bilingual event, live on Facebook.
Please join us, Thursday, June 12th at 6:30 pm.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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