Who’s it going to be Denver Broncos or the Carolina Panthers.

It looks like Denver is slightly favored right now

Where’s the love for Carolina

It’s a classic East West Battle that may be decided by either Chicken Noodle or Minestrone.

St Anne’s Annual Souper Bowl Drive to feed those in need has begun.

Cast your votes now with a can of soup.

You can vote as often as you like and everyone is a winner!

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BEFORE her drinking spiraled out of control, Sylvia Dobrow “drank like a lady,” as she put it, matching her wine to her sandwiches: “Tuna and chardonnay, roast beef and rosé.” But soon she was “drinking around the clock,” downing glasses of vodka and skim milk.

“When you try to hide your drinking from your grandchildren, you do whatever you can,” said Ms. Dobrow, 81, a mother, grandmother and great-grandmother living in Stockton, Calif.

A former hospital educator, Ms. Dobrow’s alcohol consumption became unmanageable after she lost her job and subsequently “lost my identity,” she said.

One night in early 2007, after a particularly excessive alcohol binge, Ms. Dobrow fell out of bed and suffered a black eye. That was when her two daughters, one of whom was a nurse, took her to Hemet Valley, a recovery facility in Hemet Valley, Calif., that caters to adults age 55 and older. Ms. Dobrow, who was 73 at the time, stayed for 30 days, which cost roughly $20,000, about $13,000 of which was covered by insurance. When she returned home, she continued with a 12-step program. She has been sober ever since.

An estimated 2.8 million older adults in the United States meet the criteria for alcohol abuse, and this number is expected to reach 5.7 million by 2020, according to a study in the journal “Addiction.” In 2008, 231,200 people over 50 sought treatment for substance abuse, up from 102,700 in 1992, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a federal agency.

While alcohol is typically the substance of choice, a 2013 report found that the rate of illicit drug use among adults 50 to 64 increased from 2.7 percent in 2002 to 6.0 percent in 2013.

“As we get older, it takes longer for our bodies to metabolize alcohol and drugs,” said D. John Dyben, the director of older adult treatment services for the Hanley Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. “Someone might say, ‘I could have two or three glasses of wine and I was fine, and now that I’m in my late 60s, it’s becoming a problem.’ That’s because the body can’t handle it.”

Many, although certainly not all, of these older individuals with alcohol problems are retired.

Over the course of 10 years, Peter A. Bamberger and Samuel B. Bacharach, co-authors of “Retirement and the Hidden Epidemic,” conducted a study funded by the National Institutes of Health on substance abuse in older adults. They found that the impact of retirement on substance abuse was “anything but clear cut, with the conditions leading to retirement, and the economic and social nature of the retirement itself, having a far greater impact on substance use than simple retirement itself,” said Mr. Bamberger, who is also research director of the Smithers Institute at Cornell University.

But events that arise in later life often require coping skills older adults may not possess. Some retirees are lonely and depressed, and turn to alcohol or drugs to quell their anxieties. Others may drink to deal with late-life losses of spouses, friends, careers and purpose.

“In retirement there can be depression, divorce, death of a spouse, moving from a big residence into a small residence,” said Steven Wollman, a substance abuse counselor in New York, . “For anyone who’s an addict, boredom’s the No. 1 trigger.”

Sandra D., 58, who works in the financial services industry in Toronto, said that her father’s drinking increased so much after he retired that she often took the car keys away from him.

“He and his friends meet for cocktails at about 3 or 4 and then he passes out, which he calls a ‘nap,’ ” said Ms. D., who asked that her full last name not be used. “My dad didn’t plan out his retirement well. My mom was very ill for many years before she passed away, and my dad was a caregiver. He was pretty well looking after the house and taking care of her. When she passed away, there was a very big void for him.”

Ms. D. said her father, an 82-year-old former maintenance worker, doesn’t believe he drinks too much, a common perception among many seniors.

“People are really good at redefining things,” said Stephan Arndt, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and director of the Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation. “They say, ‘I don’t have a problem, I just like to drink.’ Or, ‘I’m a big guy, I can handle it.’ In the case of prescription drugs, it’s, ‘Well, I got it from my doctor, and it’s for my pain. It’s medication.’ Consequently, they don’t seek help.”

Physicians often aren’t trained to talk to their older patients about chemical dependency — or, perhaps more pointedly in an era of managed care, they often don’t have the time to thoroughly screen a patient. Also, many signs of chemical dependence like memory loss and disorientation resemble normal symptoms of aging. “Is this person confused because they’re messing up their meds, or is it dementia?” said Brenda J. Iliff, the executive director of Hazelden, a residential treatment center in Naples, Fla., that offers special programming baby boomers and older adults for about $21,000 a month. “Is their diabetes out of control, or did they fall and break their hip because they were woozy from Atavan?”

Another misconception is that older adults don’t benefit from treatment. “There’s this lore, this belief, that as people get older they become less treatable,” said Paul Sacco, an assistant professor of social work at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, who researches aging and addiction. “But there’s a large body of literature saying that the outcomes are as good with older adults. They’re not hopeless. This may be just the time to get them treatment.”

Pamela Noffze was 58 when she arrived at Hazelden‘s center in Naples for treatment. At her worst, she was drinking a case of light beer a day, but she didn’t think she had an issue until her daughter threatened to ban her from seeing her grandsons again unless she sought help. “That’s when I knew I had to do something,” said Ms. Noffze.

On her first night at Hazelden, she discovered that she was also addicted to Klonopin, an anti-anxiety medication that her psychiatrist had prescribed in 2009 to help her cope with a divorce. Weaning herself off prescription medications was harder than stopping drinking, she said. Still, she has not had a sip of alcohol or any pills since rehab.

Ms. Noffze, now 61, who lives in Naples and is unemployed, regularly attends 12-step meetings. She said she was astonished at the number of people who “have their cocktails every night, and the next thing they know they find themselves addicted because some doctor gave them Ambien to sleep or they were on pain pills for arthritis or whatever,” she said. “You put those two together and you put yourself over the edge.”

As for Ms. Dobrow, she was so emboldened by her recovery that in 2010 she went back to school to get a credential as a substance abuse counselor. She now works part time counseling older adults at Hemet Valley.

“Losing your purpose in life is the singular thing that hurts people,” said Ms. Dobrow. “We involve so much of our ego in our career, but these last seven and a half years have been the most fulfilling of my life, because I can help people. What is when people used to wear a sandwich board and walk around in a commercial? I feel that mine says ’Hope’ on the front and on the back.”

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Sermon
Proper 17, Year A

Bring forth in us the fruit of good works…

How does God talk with you? What does it take to get your attention, to make you stop and listen, to hear? Some people are really good at discerning God all the time. Others, like me, not so much. Too often God needs a 2 x 4, that’s something like the burning bush that is not consumed for Moses. God hears our needs, observes our misery and our joys – God is always present in our life. We don’t always notice it.
In this story from the Hebrew scripture, God is asking Moses to help the people in captivity, to lead them “to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey. Remember that Moses has fled from his posh position in Pharaoh’s court to become a shepherd in a land far away. As a young man, the adopted son of the daughter of Pharaoh, he learns he is an Israelite and that his siblings and mother are slaves. A few days later he tries to help some of the slaves that are being harassed and ends up killing one of the Egyptian taskmasters. So he runs away – far away. Now God is calling him to go back to Pharaoh and bring his people out of Egypt.
This morning we hear the first of many conversations that Moses will have with God as he attempts to get out of doing this task, and then as he is trying to accomplish the task. Moses doesn’t really have a relationship with the people he is supposed to help. He doesn’t know their names or anything about their lives – he didn’t live with them. Moses does know God. Moses listens to what God wants him to do, and then, reluctantly at first, he tries to do the work that God has given him to do. Moses chooses to serve the Lord, to do good works.
In Paul’s letter to the Romans, he is encouraging the Christians to listen to the word of God. Society is tough for those people; Christians are persecuted. They are a strange minority religion in a city with many different religions. God sends Paul to give them counsel on how to live a life of good works in a culture that values earthly power and riches. The list of things that Paul encourages them to do, we are encouraged to do today. It is not an easy list. “Hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good, love one another…rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer…extend hospitality to strangers…bless those who persecute you…live in harmony with one another…do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly…do not pay anyone evil for evil…if your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink…” So which of those things is hard for you to do? What has God been calling you to do?
Jesus is preparing his disciples for what is to come. It’s not a pretty picture, and it’s not the victory that those who have been following him envisioned. They expect that the messiah will triumph over all who oppress the Israelites (much like Moses who leads the people out of slavery to a good land – their own land) and that they will have peace in a land of milk and honey. Jesus sets them straight. The victory is going to be eternal life overcoming death. Our part is to let go of our love of life as society may dictate as successful and live a life that God dictates as successful. Serve the Lord by bearing fruit of good works.
What has God been calling you to do? That might be the wrong question. What is God doing in the community and how can we be part of God’s work? The emphasis is that God is working whether we choose to do anything or not. God does call us, continually. It’s just not always to do something comfortable. In his last Friday reflection, Bishop David suggested that it may be better stewardship to replace our church lawns with gardens. Can you imagine our neighbors’ reaction if we did that – planted lots of tomatoes, beans, carrots, corn, squash? I was talking with the Bishop about this and how I imagined we would get word from the neighborhood association in short order. We talked about how our church should be a reminder – even an irritant – to our neighbors. Our church should be about raising social issues to the attention of the affluent whether they are sitting in the pews or living in the blocks around us. We’re not a social club; we are called to work with God.
Many of you are involved with groups that are already doing this work. We need to hear from you. How are you helping do God’s work in our community? Are there ways that others can get involved, too? Last Sunday I talked about the Community Partnership for Families and the different programs they are developing with recently released prisoners. Some of us got involved with their backpack project. I know that we have parishioners who are members of the Assistance League, coach youth sports, volunteer for Hospice, and other organizations who are working with God in our community. It’s time to let the rest of us know what you are doing.
I am going to put up a large poster in the back…a Fruits of Good Works. There will be pens available. List your name and the work that you do. If you have a picture you can post, please put it up there. We need to see some of the outreach that is being done by members of St. Anne’s. God is working here in Stockton and we have been called to follow. God promises “for my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” We can do this – together.

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It took a few days to deliver the donations to the group of homeless people because they have to constantly keep moving. They were very happy to receive the items and are doing well. They are still building bicycles and pursuing their dreams.

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CLICK HERE TO RESERVE YOUR TICKETS

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St Anne Hosted the Northern Deanery Meeting and Bishop David Rice and his wife Tracy were in attendance. He shared his passion and vision for the future of the San Joaquin Diocese and took questions from those in attendance. He is both inspired and inspiring with his plans to see our congregations reaching out into the community.  He received an enthusiastic welcome and we shared a delicious lunch.

 

 

 
 

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HOME VESTRY PAPERS VITAL POSTS YOUR TURN TOOLS WEBINARS TOPICS ABOUT US

From the Editor

 

December 4, 2013

On the first Sunday in Advent, I was catching up on my reading and discovered this article on the front page of The Boston Globe: “A gift of warmth for and from the homeless.” This ministry – started by people who formerly were homeless and who trained alongside congregational leaders at the diocese’sLeadership Development Initiative - is a powerful witness to what can happen when people venture beyond their comfort zones and begin to build relationships with those they might otherwise ignore.

This month, Vestry Papers continues our theme ofAnswering Jesus’ Call with stories from congregations and individuals who choose to live their lives as agents of Jesus’ mission to make the world more loving and more just. There are many stories like this across our church. Here are the four chosen for this month’s Vestry Papers:

Sometimes the way to get people ‘back to church’ is by starting a different kind of church. Better yet, offering individuals or small groups the freedom to design their own form of worship. In “Laundry Love,” Nancy Davidge shares the story of a tiny worshipping community in Southern California where community engagement takes precedence over worship.

Ruth Meteer’s “College Ministry to Go” describes how the relationship between St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church and the University of Rhode Island has become stronger thanks to two students interested in addressing issues of hunger on campus.

One of the country’s first diaper banks began in a small Episcopal Church in McHenry, Illinois. “Diaper Bank” by Lu Stanton León shares the story of how given the increased need for diapers, St. Paul’s changed their strategy and invited others in the community to join them in this ministry.

There is no more sacred moment in our lives than when we are able to serve those around us with love and humility. In “I’ll Go With You” Ema Rosero-Nordalm shares how she discovered a gift we can offer each other in times of anxiety and fear. This article is available in Englishand Spanish.

Each article includes a list of linked resources offering additional information and/or practical tools.  Interested in what else might be on the ECF Vital Practices’ website? Use the Topics index on each page of the site to find other resources related to leadership including past Vestry Papers articles, blog posts, and the many resources found in our Your Turn and Tools sections.

For those reading this who only receive Vestry Papers, please consider subscribing to ECF Vital Practices andVestry Papers. Click on Subscribe on the upper right hand corner of this page and complete the registration form to have Vestry Papers and ECF Vital Practices content delivered twice a month to your email inbox.

Faithfully,

Nancy

Nancy Davidge
Editor, ECF Vital Practices

PS: To make it easier for congregational leaders to find the resources offered through ECF Vital Practices, please consider adding a link to ECF Vital Practices to your website. Here’s how: Using your websites ‘add a link’ tool, insert our full URL –  http://www.ecfvp.org/.

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Kitchens and Relationships :D o something good for your community, right now: go into your parish hall kitchen and take down the signs.

Leaving in Love: Changes will happen, people come and go, but what binds us together is love for God and one another, and so it needs to be said every now and then.

 

Sunday is Over: The end of attending church on Sunday as a cultural norm reshapes the experience of being Christian in the United States. What does this mean for us in the church?

Tools & Resources

Advent Resources: Links to free Advent resources, calendars and devotions, reflections, St. Nicholas Day, and preparing for Christmas visitors at your church.

Advent Devotional Calendar 2013: A beautiful, simple, and low tech calendar for Advent. Download, print, and share.

Build a Healthy Vestry: January elections are right around the corner. Here are some tools to help with finding new members for your vestry.

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As Thanksgiving approaches we are grateful for all of the blessings that have enriched our lives. Many of us would like to show our appreciation by helping those who are in need.

We are excited to announce that we will be collecting food to donate to the Emergency Food Bank. To make it easy for all of us we can bring our donations to church on Sunday and the St Ann Vestry will get them to the Food Bank. If you forget there are stores right around the corner that you can stop by after the service and pick up a few items to bring back.

The Emergency Food Bank is in need of all of the fixing for Thanksgiving Dinner, but is also making a push to fill it’s pantry selves. High Protein foods are especially appreciated but all items are welcome.

To learn more about the Emergency  Food Bank visit their website at: http://www.stocktonfoodbank.org

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The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin
The Friday Reflection Title

August 30, 2013

 

 

 

Friday Reflection for August 30, 2013

 

A few days ago I parked in front of my bank on the main street in town and was amazed to see a dozen or more little white receipts blowing all over the sidewalk.  I commented to the man using the other ATM machine that people didn’t seem to care about what happened to their receipts or maybe they didn’t see the nearby  trash can.  He made some acknowledgement that indicated that he had heard but didn’t seem interested in more conversation.  As I waited for my transaction to process, I bent over and picked up a few of the receipts littering the sidewalk.  When my transaction was totally complete, I made a point of picking up all the receipts I saw on the sidewalk and put them in the nearby trash can.

 

As I climbed into my car and started the engine, I noticed the man who had been at the neighboring machine was also done.  Then, I was surprised to see him bending over picking up some receipts near his own car, one in the gutter and one near the front of his car.  I wondered to myself, did I start him thinking about the trash or would he have  done it on his own?

I didn’t really know the exact  answer to that question.  Do we ever know what influence we might have on others?  Do we ever know how our modeling, our simply act, might influence someone else?

As a classroom teacher, I  never really know if anything I say or do has a life-changing effect on my  students, especially with the kindergartners I teach daily.  Will they remember any of what I say, more importantly will they remember any of what we did together?  Will they remember the hugs, the challenges, the successes, the caring environment I try so hard to create?

 

What about Jesus, he  taught his disciples with stories and hoped his own life would be a model to others.  He compared real things with our lives. Our faith is like a mustard seed. He compared people saying,  Don’t be like  hypocrites.  He washed his disciples feet to model how to serve others.   He hoped that his modeling would be seen by others so they might act more faithful and loving.  His most famous biblical quote might be the key to all that we model in our lives.

“Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.  35 By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

 

As I thought about this man seeming to model what I had done, I wondered what other actions do I model?  What do I model toward my students? What do I model to my congregation and my friends?  What do I model as a believer to unbelievers? Our greatest act of Christian witness to the world  comes in how we live our life.

Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God, serve one another with whatever gift each of you has received.  11 Whoever speaks must do so as one speaking the very words of God; whoever serves must do so with the strength that God supplies, so that God may be glorified in all things through Jesus Christ. To him belong the glory and the power forever and ever. (1 Peter 4:10)  Amen.

 

Suzy Ward+

 

“Participating in God’s Reconciling Love”

St. James, Sonora Festival Welcoming Eucharist…

 

St. James, Sonora  

St. James Episcopal Church

 affectionately known as “The Red Church”

 

 

Festival Welcoming Eucharist 

 

September 8, 2013

4:00 p.m. 

42 Snell Street

Sonora, CA 95370

Map

St. James Episcopal Church welcomes all to our Festival Welcoming Eucharist, Sunday, September 8, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served after the service.

The entire community is welcome to come join in song, praise, and thanksgiving for St. James Episcopal Church in Sonora. Bishop Chet Talton will be our celebrant and preacher.
Come and bring friends to join us in our celebration!

From The Haiti Task Force …

STILL SUPPORTING FOYER NOTRE DAME

 

Due to the vision and the encouragement of our bishop, The Rt. Rev. Chet Talton, we’ve been engaged in a friendship with the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti for almost two years.

 

The major focus of our efforts has been to support the Foyer Notre Dame, a home for indigent older women in Port au Prince. The Foyer is lovingly and efficiently run by the Sisters of St. Margaret and seeks to house, feed and care for seven residents at this time. About half of the Foyer was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake and the hope is soon they will be able to house more ladies. It costs $200 per month to house and care for a resident and our goal his year was to sponsor all seven residents for the year.

 

While there are many other things we could do and might do to support the people of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, the continuing sponsorship of the residents of Foyer Notre Dame is not only attainable, it is tangible and direct. The Sisters of St. Margaret are 100% accountable, and the money we send to them goes directly to the support of the residents of the Foyer, who would certainly be homeless without the Foyer.

 

In 2012 we sent around $11,000 to Haiti for Foyer Notre Dame, and this year, as a result of a Diocesan-wide Pentecost Ingathering, we have sent slightly over $8,250, a good portion of which went to the improvement of toilet facilities at Foyer Notre Dame.

 

During our Diocesan Convention in October, we will have the opportunity to get acquainted with Sister Marie Therese, who is the Sister in charge of Foyer Notre Dame. She is a delightful woman and never misses an opportunity to help someone in need. I am glad you will be able to meet her yourselves. In the meantime, please continue praying for our sisters and brothers in Haiti, and to raise monies for the support of Foyer Notre Dame. It would be very good if our giving this year exceeded that of last year.

 

Blessings,

 

The Rev. Harold Clinehens

Chair, Haiti Task Force

 

The Episcopal Network for Stewardship (TENS)…

tens logo 

Dear Friends,

 

The Diocese of San Joaquin is a member of The Episcopal Network for Stewardship (TENS), an organization committed to inspiring generosity and faithful discipleship.  A primary benefit of membership is that all congregations throughout the diocese have access to the 2013 Stewardship Narrative Series, a program designed to complement and support the fall annual giving program. The series is now available in English Spanish, Chinese and Korean.

 

To access the material contact the diocesan office for the username and password to our TENS account.

 

You will have access to the following materials:

  • Seven Bulletin Inserts to include Worship Bulletins, E-Newsletters, E-Blasts beginning October 6th through November 10th. Each reflection includes discussion questions that can be used for adult formation gatherings.
  • Pledge card and proportional giving chart
  • Prayers of the People to be used in liturgy over the course of six weeks
  • Prayer over the Pledge Cards to be used at the in-gathering of pledges.
  • Introductory Letter from the Rector/Vicar
  • Introductory Letter from the Stewardship Chair
  • Letter of Encouragement from the Senior Warden

 

Best Practices in Using the 2013 TENS Flourish in Faith Stewardship Narrative Series

 

If you are looking to learn best practices in using the Flourish in Faith Series for this year’s fall pledge campaign, sign up for a free webinar on September 18th hosted by The Episcopal Church Foundation. Led by TENS Board Members The Rev. Angela Emerson, Stewardship Missioner, in The Episcopal Diocese of Vermont and JR Lander, President of TENS, and Vicar of St. Columba’s in the Diocese of Olympia, who will share how to effectively plant the seeds of faithful giving in your congregation using the Flourish in Faith Narrative Series.

 

Click Here to Register!  

 

We give thanks to the ministry of The Episcopal Network for Stewardship for their work in inspiring generosity and faithful discipleship.

 

From the Diocesan Office…

 

  Dio seal

The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin

54th Annual Convention

October 25 and 26, 2013

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Modesto

Participating in God’s Reconciling Love

” So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled with your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.”

- Matthew 5:23-24

 

Registration Forms available on-line now at www.diosanjoaquin.org

 

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CONVENTION REMINDER:  TO CLERGY AND TREASURERS

A reminder for all parishes and missions.  By Canon to have seat, voice, and vote at the upcoming diocesan Convention, participating parishes and missions must be current in their assessment payments.  To be considered current all assessments through September 2013 must be received at the diocesan office no later than October 18, 2013.  If you have questions about your assessment payment status please contact the Diocesan Administrator Ellen Meyer at 209-576-0104 or emeyer@diosanjoaquin.org

From the Diocesan Office…

 

Please mark your calendar for these upcoming meetings and events. Watch for additional details in the Friday Reflection.

  • Celebration of Ministry Retreat, August 30 through September 1, 2013, ECCO
  • Festival Welcoming Eucharist, September 8, 2013, 4:00 p.m., St. James, Sonora
  • Parish and Mission Audit Committee Teleconference Meeting, September 11, 2013, 10 a.m.
  • Northern Deanery Clericus, September 10, 2013, 11:00 a.m., St Matthew’s, San Andreas
  • Southern Deanery Meeting, September 14, 2013, 11:00 a.m., St. Sherrian’s, Kernville
  • Diocesan Council Meeting, September 21, 2013, 10:30 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Standing Committee Meeting, September 21, 2013, 11:00 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Northern Deanery Meeting, October 5, 2013, 10 a.m., TBD
  • Convention Arrangement Committee Meeting, October 12, 2013, 10 a.m., St. Paul’s, Modesto
  • Commission on Ministry Meeting, October 12, 2013, 10 a.m., Holy Family, Fresno
  • Central Deanery Meeting, October 13, 2013, 3:00 p.m., Holy Family, Fresno

 

 

Do you wish to see what else the Diocese is up to? Click here for The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin calendar.

 

From our Parishes and Missions…

St. Matthew’s, San Andreas has a Tabernacle FREE for any parish that would like to have it.  It is used and needs have a locksmith fix the lock.  It is 19 3/4 inches high X 15 inches. Please call Saint Matthew’s Church in San Andreas at (209) 754-3878.

Jesus Icon 2 St. Francis, Turlock -

Iconography Workshop Offered in Northern Deanery

September 20-22nd! 

 

We have a rare gift in store: Joyce Tanner, our Diocesan Iconographer, will be presenting a series of workshops at St. Francis in Turlock. Learning to “write” an icon–which is really a form of prayer–is an ancient devotion. Joyce Tanner, a member of St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, will teach us, step by step, the process of putting prayer into image.

 

The three workshops will begin on Friday, September 20, from 9 am to 4 pm, continue all day Saturday, and will conclude on Sunday from noon until 4 pm. St. Francis meets for Holy Eucharist at 10 am, so class members are encouraged to visit us that day.

 

Joyce will supply all materials needed to complete an icon of ‘Christ, the Good Shepherd’ but if you already have your own brushes you are welcome to bring them.  The cost for the 3 day workshop is $50. Snacks and beverages will be provided but please bring a sack lunch for Friday and Saturday’s sessions.

St. Francis is located at 915 East Main St, Turlock, on the corner of Pioneer St.  The class size is limited to 12 participants, so don’t delay! If you’d like to register or have any questions, please contact The Rev. Kathie Galicia at revkathie@hotmail.com, or 209-324-1677.

 

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St. Paul’s Church

First Annual Pancake Breakfast

Saturday, September 21st

7-11 am

 

  pancake

Family Adventure Door Prize

Bountiful Raffle Prizes

Children’s Decorate a Pancake: Edible Craft Tables

 

Adult tickets $10

Children (3-12) are only $5

 

*Tickets sold in the church office

209-522-3267

 

 

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

1528 Oakdale Road, Modesto, CA

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St. John the Bapisit Flyer

For our Diocesan Prayer Calendar…. click here

Bishop’s and Canon’s Calendars…

Bishop Talton’s Calendar

 

 

August 30- September 1    Ministry Conference, ECCO

 

September 8                       St. James, Sonora –  Welcoming Eucharist

 

September 15                     Church of the Saviour, Hanford

 

October 6                            St. Francis, Turlock

 

October 13                          St. Paul’s, Visalia

 

 

 

Canon Cullinane’s Calendar

 

 

August 30-September 1      Ministry Conference, ECCO

September 8                       St. James, Sonora- Welcoming Eucharist

 

September 15                     St. Andrew’s, Taft

 

Keep up to date on news and events with the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin website www.diosanjoaquin.orgClick here: Our Website
Contact Information
phone: 209-576-0104

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Sermon

Proper 16, Year C

The words of Isaiah this morning are from “Third Isaiah”.  “The Book of Isaiah is a composite work, the product of several different prophets who ministered at different periods in the history ofIsrael.”  (HarperCollins Study Bible, Introduction to Isaiah)  In a nutshell, First Isaiah predicts the downfall of the kingdom of Judah and the scattering of the people; Second Isaiah brings a message of hope and deliverance to the people living in exile and predicting their return to Judah; Third Isaiah speaks to the people that have returned and the prophet urges them to stay true to God in spite of the harshness of life they have as returnees to Judah.  Third Isaiah reiterates the promise of Second Isaiah that those who stay true to God will receive the riches promised eternal joy and prosperity.

So the words written for the Israelites in early 500 BCE, “if you offer your food to the hungry and satisfy the needs of the afflicted…if you call the Sabbath a delight and the holy day of the Lord honorable; if you honor it, not going your own ways, serving your own interests, or pursuing your own affairs; then you shall take delight in the Lord” (verses 10a, 13-14) seem to be twisted around by the time Jesus is teaching.

This morning as Jesus is teaching he notices a woman who has been crippled for, we are told, eighteen years.  He lays hands on her and she is released from the bondage that has held her captive for eighteen years.  He was satisfying the needs of the afflicted, but the leader of the synagogue is indignant because he has “cured” on the sabbath.  Now laying hands on someone does not sound like work to us today, but in obeying the letter of the law, it was.  There was a disconnect at times between the strict adherence to the law and the intent of the law.

Last week, Jesus spoke about not bringing peace, but bringing division.  His mission was to bring change, and a good example of that is in the gospel for today.  You untie your animals and lead them to water on the sabbath.   Why not free a person from their afflictions on the sabbath?  The group is divided between the leaders who have been put to shame and the people who rejoice at the works of his hand.  This is the third time that Jesus has created a sabbath controversy teaching in the synagogue.

Today, as we sit comfortably in our pews, we need to honestly confront what is holding us in bondage.  What has you all tied up?  There are physical ailments, like the woman in the story this morning, that may be easy to see, but not so simple to heal.  There are emotional bonds that tie us in ways we may not even realize, but they have an effect on our relationships and our ability to function.  There are changes in our life that paralyze us.  The world is full of violence and natural disasters.  So what can we do?

We are in the difficult place of called to be a helper to the afflicted and being one of the afflicted.  Many times we are able to help someone because they are bound by the same affliction that we experience.  Reaching out to help others in need helps us to reduce our own bondage.  That is one reason we come together in community.  We gather on Sunday to get the support and healing we need to go out and work in the world for another week.  We are called to help each other loose those bonds which keep us from being whole.  And thank God, that Jesus has made it perfectly acceptable to do that any time and any place, even on Sunday in church.

This week be mindful of those around you.  Be a light in the darkness.  Do the small things that just might make a difference in the life of someone suffering from an affliction.  It can be as easy as just looking and seeing that person as a child of God.        AMEN.

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