The Friday Reflection
September 18, 2020
Bishop David Rice

Vote faithfully
Vote faithfully from Bishop David

BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS
Sunday, October 4th – Participate virtually!
The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi commemorates the life of the patron saint of animals and the environment. It is fitting that the month-long “Season of Creation” that started on September 1st ends on October 4th, the Feast of St. Francis.
In remembrance of St. Francis’ love for all creatures, you and your pet(s) are invited to a “Virtual Blessing of the Animals” on the feast day, October 4th at 10:00AM.
To facilitate the virtual blessings, we are asking you to register your animal(s) for their blessing by clicking on the “register button” below. Please fill out the form and if at all possible, please submit a photo.
Participants do not need to be a member of the Cathedral Congregation–everyone is welcome to participate. Share the virtual blessing with your family, friends, and neighbors.
The registration deadline is Wednesday, September 30th at 5:00PM.
For the youngest among us who might not have a pet, but a favorite stuffed animal, they are welcome to register their furry friend for a blessing too.

Creation Care Commission Animators/Advocates
Have you wondered what an animator/advocate does for their local community when it comes to creation care? Bishop David and Deacon Terrance outline what those people do.
1. Engage with me as the commission chair and the Creation Commission in assisting you in your local community. For example: If a local community wants to do a community garden and needs help with how to start the Commission will help with resources.
2. Animate/Advocate for faith communities. Involves pulling down info from Friday Reflection, sharing commission updates, and having a voice on BC or vestry.
3. Survey and engage local community/vestry/clergy on what is already being done for creation care in homes and at the church. Discuss with community ideas for doing more. Such as, are you recycling, have you stopped using single-use plastic bottled water, etc. Use resources from Friday Reflection tips for places to start.
4. The Animator needs to be observant of ecological dates of note and let community know. For example, when is earth day, or Season of Creation. The Commission can help with resources.
5. Be the environmental prophet and pest. Be a pest and cajole, local communities to do something out of our faith framework in regards to creation care. If you need resources or ideas reach out to a member of the commission.
If you think you might be called to this ministry, please speak with your local clergy person or Deacon Terrance at deaconterrance@diosanjoaquin.org.
Download the full letter here.

Recycle toys, books, and clothes by donating them instead of throwing them out.
While many thrift stores were not taking donations many have resumed! Call your local thrift store and ask.

“All these years later, it’s those flowers – growing in pots, cans and left-over bottles of Coke or detergent – that has remained most vivid in my mind.  They capture for me the creativity, resilience and determination of migrants everywhere to find and fashion a better, more beautiful life for themselves and their family.” – The Rev. Tom Hampson, Deacon

.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
SJRAISE Planning Meeting
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 23 | 7:00 PM
Oakhurst – ZOOM
Clergy Gathering
September 24 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 24 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Nominations Due
September 28
Standing Committee
September 29 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 30 | 7:00 PM
Bakersfield – ZOOM

Creek Fire Update

All ECCO employees who live on site have evacuated to safer places, and ECCO has continued to provide and take care of them during this difficult time.
If you would like to make a donation for those affected by the Creek Fire you can do so online here:
Or you can mail checks to the Diocesan office:
EDSJ
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726
Memo: Creek Fire Disaster Assistance
Thank you to all who have donated! Your continued support and prayers are greatly appreciated.
To see the Diocesan news sent out about this on Sunday, September 6th, please click here.

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

Close-Up:Representation of
LGBT People in Cinema
Beginning September 15 (and scheduled for the second Tuesday of each month) St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, is hosting a series – via Zoom – called Close-Up and exploring the representation of LGBT people in cinema. Each session will feature a film (or occasionally a documentary) as the focus of a presentation and conversation. The featured film will be advertised well before the meeting with links to where it can be bought, rented and/or streamed.
The first meeting will center on the documentary The Celluloid Closet. Released in 1995 and based on Vito Russo’s 1981 book of the same name. The documentary uses Russo’s work and expands it with lectures and clip presentations detailing how LGBT characters have been portrayed in Hollywood films over the years. You can rent to stream the documentary via Amazon here. Two other documentaries that might be of interest are The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender and LGBT Film History: The Early Years (1910s-1920s). The latter is free on YouTube, and focuses primarily on German cinema. Nevertheless, it is incredibly well-made and highlights how German representation of LGBT people in film before the Second World War informed and influenced Hollywood movie makers.
Again, the first session will be Tuesday, September 15, and begins at 6.30pm. You can access the Zoom meeting via this link.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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Dear St. Anne’s community,
I hope that I will see many of you tonight at 7:00 PM for Wednesday Evening Prayer with Bishop David. The Bishop will lead Evening Prayer. From 7:30-8:15pm the Bishop and Canon will share in discussion about the current state of the world.
Please find attached the guide and here is the Zoom info below:

Click the following link to view. St. Annes Visitation Guide

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87409472172?pwd=ZnVRTnRjRm5RT3BlZVhOeWRPTWQ2QT09 <https://www.google.com/url?q=https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87409472172?pwd%3DZnVRTnRjRm5RT3BlZVhOeWRPTWQ2QT09&sa=D&source=calendar&ust=1600536235654000&usg=AOvVaw3jXP7vk4fBGfmQkZBuLAjv>
Meeting ID: 874 0947 2172
Password: 749593
One tap mobile
+14086380968,,87409472172# US (San Jose)
Peace,
Rev. Ryan G. Eikenbary
Priest-in-Charge, Episcopal Church of St. Anne
Pastor, Zion Lutheran Church
rev.eikenbary@gmail.com <mailto:rev.eikenbary@gmail.com>

A prayer on the anniversary of September 11th
O Almighty God, who brings good out of evil and turns even the wrath of your children towards your promised peace: Hear our prayers this day as we remember those of many nations and differing faiths whose lives were cut short by the fierce flames of anger and hatred. Hasten the time when the menace of war shall be removed. Cleanse both us and those perceived to be our enemies of all hatred and distrust. Pour out the spirit of peace on all the rulers of our world that we may be brought through strife to the lasting peace of the kingdom of your Son; Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen
The Friday Reflection
September 11, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael

This week I celebrate my fourth year here in EDSJ. Happy Anniversary friends!

If you remember when I first arrived, I started to ask folks “would your neighborhood/community notice if your church suddenly shut its doors”. I had asked this question of my own congregation in Eastern Oregon when I first started my walk with them, and it informed the way we did ministry both inside and outside our four walls, as well as our approach to stewardship, communications, and virtually everything else we did.
One of my first visitations in EDSJ, and one of the places I love to brag on, is St Andrew’s Taft. Many of you have heard me talk about the amazing work happening at Taft, but let’s refrain the story through the lens of leadership. What does it mean to be a leader in a congregation with no clergy person and very few Sunday worshippers, and a booming feeding ministry? What does it mean to be the church in that context? Would the neighborhood/community notice if the church suddenly shut its doors permanently?
On one of the virtual visitations that Bp David and I recently did, we had a chat with our friends at St Andrew’s and we saw, once again, the church being the church in the best ways possible. It’s messy, sometimes chaotic, sometimes exhausting, and totally life giving.
To be a leader in a congregation with no clergy person and few Sunday worshippers is in its own way, challenging. Many of you reading this article are in similar situations. It means that the laity have to all pull together to do the work…there are reports to complete, pastoral care issues to attend to, and just the day to day operation of a facility to manage. But throw a booming (and I do mean booming) feeding ministry on top of that in the midst of a global pandemic…WOW. So as I talked to my friends Carl and Shari about their 4 year feeding ministry anniversary, here’s what they had to share:
  1. Volunteers are key:   The volunteers required to make their operation work are part of what they’ve developed as the “Homeless Collective”. In other words, their volunteers are also recipients of the food ministry. They have their food handlers permits, they are mentored and trained by others, and now they freely and lovingly serve others.
  2. Start small and manageable but dream big: They started small with PB & J sandwiches in the church courtyard and continued dreaming big. Then they began gleaning from local markets and restaurants, which has evolved to receiving between 50-75,000 pounds of food per month. Now, they prepare daily meals and provide groceries to 2,271 families and 8,063 individuals per month (that number is as June).
  3. Patience and persistence are important: When they first opened their ministry, the local community was critical, believing that the ministry was enabling the homeless and making them dependent on “handouts”. However, over time (and especially since COVID started), St Andrews has helped to relieve some of the food insecurity in their community. They have also seen other positives such as a reduction in bug infestations, disease, violence and poor hygiene because people aren’t digging through dumpsters and trash for food. As Carl and Shari shared with the Bishop and I, “When people are deprived of basic needs like food, water, restrooms and shelter, they become like wild animals and do things we never thought possible. When people know there is plenty, there is no need of worry, and peace and calm becomes the new normal.” (I suspect we could all benefit from that lesson)
  4. LOVE is the answer: Their hope for the remainder of 2020 and 2021 is to continue to welcome people in LOVE without question or judgment. “The world is going through challenging times, however, here at St Andrews you can come in out of the storm and be comforted in the refuge of God.”
I know my friends, that the last six months have challenged all of us. We miss each other, we miss gathering in community, and we are missing our “normal” routines. But I hope you can find a ray of light and hope in the moments of darkness. For me, on this anniversary of my fourth year as your Canon, I can say with confidence that our neighborhoods and communities absolutely depend on us. We may not look like the church that we once were, we may be serving in different ways, but we are ESSENTIAL to the wellbeing of others. St Andrews in Taft is an example to us all.
God bless you, God be with you, and remember, YOU ARE LOVED.
Canon Anna

BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS
Sunday, October 4th – Participate virtually!
The Feast of St. Francis of Assisi commemorates the life of the patron saint of animals and the environment. It is fitting that the month-long “Season of Creation” that started on September 1st ends on October 4th, the Feast of St. Francis.
In remembrance of St. Francis’ love for all creatures, you and your pet(s) are invited to a “Virtual Blessing of the Animals” on the feast day, October 4th at 10:00AM.
To facilitate the virtual blessings, we are asking you to register your animal(s) for their blessing by clicking on the “register button” below. Please fill out the form and if at all possible, please submit a photo.
Participants do not need to be a member of the Cathedral Congregation–everyone is welcome to participate. Share the virtual blessing with your family, friends, and neighbors.
The registration deadline is Wednesday, September 30th at 5:00PM.
For the youngest among us who might not have a pet, but a favorite stuffed animal, they are welcome to register their furry friend for a blessing too.

Check Cabinets for Expired Medicine and Properly Dispose of Them
Avoid flushing medicines and other dangerous chemicals in the toilet or washing them down the sink. Instead, find your local med disposal location and take them there. This will help keep water clean and drug-free for other people drink and animals and plants to live in and consume.

“All these years later, it’s those flowers – growing in pots, cans and left-over bottles of Coke or detergent – that has remained most vivid in my mind.  They capture for me the creativity, resilience and determination of migrants everywhere to find and fashion a better, more beautiful life for themselves and their family.” – The Rev. Tom Hampson, Deacon

.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary Devotional
September 12 | 6:30 PM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Resolutions Due
September 14
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 16 | 7:00 PM
St. Anne’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan Council
September 17 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE Planning Meeting
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 23 | 7:00 PM
Oakhurst – ZOOM
Clergy Gathering
September 24 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 24 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Nominations Due
September 28
Standing Committee
September 29 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 30 | 7:00 PM
Bakersfield – ZOOM

Creek Fire Update

All ECCO employees who live on site have evacuated to safer places, and ECCO has continued to provide and take care of them during this difficult time.
If you would like to make a donation for those affected by the Creek Fire you can do so online here:
Or you can mail checks to the Diocesan office:
EDSJ
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726
Memo: Creek Fire Disaster Assistance
Thank you for your continued prayers during this time.
To see the Diocesan news sent out about this on Sunday, September 6th, please click here.

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Resolutions | September 14, 2020
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

The next Diocesan Mary devotional will be September 12th at 6:30 pm on Facebook Live.
A meditation on the experience of faith of Mary: an invitation to remain firm in faith, in moments of anguish, loneliness, or illness.

Close-Up:Representation of
LGBT People in Cinema
Beginning September 15 (and scheduled for the second Tuesday of each month) St. Paul’s, Bakersfield, is hosting a series – via Zoom – called Close-Up and exploring the representation of LGBT people in cinema. Each session will feature a film (or occasionally a documentary) as the focus of a presentation and conversation. The featured film will be advertised well before the meeting with links to where it can be bought, rented and/or streamed.
The first meeting will center on the documentary The Celluloid Closet. Released in 1995 and based on Vito Russo’s 1981 book of the same name. The documentary uses Russo’s work and expands it with lectures and clip presentations detailing how LGBT characters have been portrayed in Hollywood films over the years. You can rent to stream the documentary via Amazon here. Two other documentaries that might be of interest are The Silver Screen: Color Me Lavender and LGBT Film History: The Early Years (1910s-1920s). The latter is free on YouTube, and focuses primarily on German cinema. Nevertheless, it is incredibly well-made and highlights how German representation of LGBT people in film before the Second World War informed and influenced Hollywood movie makers.
Again, the first session will be Tuesday, September 15, and begins at 6.30pm. You can access the Zoom meeting via this link.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches THIS SUNDAY, September 13th digitally. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
August 28, 2020
The Rev. Dondi

Impending doom, or celebrating of common purpose?
Image: Public Domain
09 April 2012
The COVID-19 crisis is the ultimate test of our calling to leadership as leaders. Sudden dramatic, life threatening upheaval, where all the aspects of our day to day lives remain uncertain. In this extraordinary stressful time, the value of our leadership calling is being demonstrated everyday.
Like the disciples depicted in this Rembrandt masterpiece, Christ in the Storm on Lake Galilee, those on the COVID-19 frontlines are today fighting towering waves. But just as the disciples can spot the “other side”, they do so because they have a strong sense of purpose. Theirs is a lesson in leadership for all.
It is Christ in the Storm on Lake Galilee by a Dutch painter Rembrant Van Rijn, I cannot imagine a better depiction of our current crisis. We are fighting rough waves at the moment. Everyday there are challenges. As a front line employee in healthcare it is an exhausting and an relenting battle.
That’s how I had originally understood the gospel, Christ and the disciples in the storm on Lake Galilee, the towering waves, the impending doom, the disciples caught in the chaos captured how I felt at those time of my read.
But that is not how I understand the gospel reading in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic. In my reflection, I have come to believe the gospel and what this picture is about. I have come to believe that the current crisis is revealing more than simply the nature of a virus.
By the shore of Lake Galilee the “Other Side” is within a distance sight, the destination for the troubled disciples. As Dr. Martin Luther King once said , “We are caught in an inescapable net work of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.” Like the disciples we are not fighting the waves in vain. They have a purpose …the other side and so are we.
In the recent months as a Spiritual care giver in Healthcare Institution, I have heard all the stories of profound braveries and commitment of Nurses, technicians, environmentalists, doctors and spiritual care givers. I am in awe at how they face their daily challenges with caring and selflessness. They support the medical team by providing essential services to keep the hospital clean, they care for patients, they are referred to as essential workers during this pandemic. Why do they do it?
When I listen closely to their stories and what drives them, I hear the same chorus. They feel a responsibility to care for others. they know their work is a crucial piece of a larger effort to save lives, comfort the suffering and help the vulnerable. They feel a deep purpose.
Like the “Other Side” o f Lake Galilee before them, they are offering a masterpiece in leadership. I am learning from them, how much purpose in our work matters and this is our calling…leadership with a purpose.
But there are storms gathering on the horizon. There always will be, as leaders, we must try to listen to our leadership team members to understand how to manage tomorrows’ waves. If we keenly listen we may hear: In order to summon the strength to fight the waves, leaders have to know there is a destination…”the other side” It cannot be wave after wave. There has to be a purpose. As leaders sometimes we think it is our job to define our leadership team’s purpose. Sometime that may be true. But COVID-19 era has convinced me that sometimes we need to have the humility to accept that our leadership teams may also see the destination before we do. What is important is not who saw it first, but how we can articulate it and embrace it – and how we can support each other in realizing it.
I will never look at the Christ in the Storm in Lake Galilee without thinking about we as leaders during this pandemic. In it I will see their courage and spirit. I will remember how they muscle every single circumstance because they knew what might be on the other side of lake Galilee.

Observe the Season of Creation at your congregation!
The Season of Creation is celebrated every year by Christians around the world from September 1st, the Day of Prayer for Creation, and runs through October 4th, St. Francis Day. This year’s theme has been chosen to be Jubilee for the Earth: New Rhythms, New Hope. This is fitting given the major challenges of this Spring and Summer. Our hope is that every community in the diocese will celebrate the Season of Creation. More information including liturgical and formation resources as well as ways to register your events can be found here: https://seasonofcreation.org/
The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator and all creation through repenting, repairing, and rejoicing together. During the Season of Creation, we join our siblings in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.
This year, amid crises that have shaken our world, we’re awakened to the urgent need to heal our relationships with creation and each other. During the season this year, we enter a time of restoration and hope, a jubilee for our Earth, that requires radically new ways of living with creation.
The Season of Creation unites the world’s 2.2 billion Christians around one shared purpose. With so much injustice all around us, now is the time for Christians everywhere to come together and show the world how to love each other and creation.
The Episcopal church has also developed some good resources. There are resources on both the Season of Creation and St. Francis day, and their hope is that Episcopalians will take these and plan worship services, and other ways to celebrate the Season. Find these resources here: https://episcopalchurch.org/season-creation-and-st-francis-day-resources
Any questions about the Season of Creation or any of the available resources, please reach out to The Rev. Terrance Goodpasture at deaconterrance@diosanjoaquin.org.

Honor the Season of Creation September 1-October 10
Beginning with the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation on September 1 and ending with St. Francis Day on October 4, the Season of Creation is a time-set-apart to express gratitude for God’s good creation, care for creation, and call for justice. Learn more at www.seasonofcreation.org

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

September 1 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
COM Day of Discernment

September 5 | 9:30 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Clergy Gathering
September 10 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Resolutions Due
September 14
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 16 | 7:00 PM
St. Anne’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan Council
September 17 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
SJRAISE Planning Meeting
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 23 | 7:00 PM
Oakhurst – ZOOM
Clergy Gathering
September 24 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 24 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Nominations Due
September 28
Standing Committee
September 29 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
September 30 | 7:00 PM
Bakersfield – ZOOM

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Resolutions | September 14, 2020
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

A Day of Discernment Coming:
Saturday, September 5, 2020
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, September 5 from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. via Zoom. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these
groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the priesthood.
There is no cost for this event. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information, please contact Rev. Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
August 21, 2020
The Rev. Carolyn Woodall, Deacon

Leadership can take many forms, sometimes depending on the organization or group, the personality of the one leading, the circumstances, some combination of these factors and, I’m sure, some I didn’t think about.
I retired from the Navy and there, authority was strictly hierarchical. At Officer Candidate School we were taught that leadership meant exercising that authority fairly, impartially, and from afar – or from on high, if you prefer, although “on high” meant at least a couple of levels higher than you, and most often referred to the commanding officer. Orders were given and failure to obey them would have consequences. The primary concern was the mission. The welfare of the troops and morale were important, but always subordinate to the mission.
Many companies have a similar structure, except the bottom line is, all too often, the primary consideration and the lower echelon workers are expendable – there are always people looking for work, after all.
Sounds like a good model for the church – yes? Well, no – at least it should not be, although I’ve seen it from time to time, as I’m sure is the case for most of us. My own experience with this kind of leadership is that it is goal oriented, whether it be a military mission or maximizing profits. The people in the organization are a resource for obtaining a goal. In many churches there is still a goal. Butts in the pews and maximizing giving. Hmm, goals are nice, but those are the wrong goals.
When I think of good church leadership my mind immediately goes to the Gospel according to John, Chapter 13. That’s where we find the story of Jesus washing his disciples’ feet. Before the Feast of the Passover, during supper, Jesus got up, took off his outer robe, wrapped a towel around his waist and washed his disciples’ feet. The disciples were quite uncomfortable, and Peter expressed his discomfort at Jesus washing his feet. We all know how they felt. On Maundy Thursday we enact this act of Jesus. We are likely all uncomfortable with someone, often the clergy and lay leaders, washing our feet.
But Jesus had a lesson to teach. “After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, ‘Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord-and you are right, for that is what I am. So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.”
Jesus performed a simple act of service to his disciples, teaching them the importance of service to others. That’s our lesson for leadership – that we are all simply human and, as I’ve preached before, we are all valuable and important to God. And so it should be with us. Servant leadership has a goal, but it isn’t butts in the pews or maximizing giving. Our goal is to build up and support each other. We should lead with a towel around our waist, giving to those we lead that which they need to grow closer to God and to each other. Leadership should not consist of saying, “I want you to do this,” but to say, “How can I help?”
Deacon Carolyn Woodall

Observe the Season of Creation at your congregation!
The Season of Creation is celebrated every year by Christians around the world from September 1st, the Day of Prayer for Creation, and runs through October 4th, St. Francis Day. This year’s theme has been chosen to be Jubilee for the Earth: New Rhythms, New Hope. This is fitting given the major challenges of this Spring and Summer. Our hope is that every community in the diocese will celebrate the Season of Creation. More information including liturgical and formation resources as well as ways to register your events can be found here: https://seasonofcreation.org/
The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator and all creation through repenting, repairing, and rejoicing together. During the Season of Creation, we join our siblings in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.
This year, amid crises that have shaken our world, we’re awakened to the urgent need to heal our relationships with creation and each other. During the season this year, we enter a time of restoration and hope, a jubilee for our Earth, that requires radically new ways of living with creation.
The Season of Creation unites the world’s 2.2 billion Christians around one shared purpose. With so much injustice all around us, now is the time for Christians everywhere to come together and show the world how to love each other and creation.
The Episcopal church has also developed some good resources. There are resources on both the Season of Creation and St. Francis day, and their hope is that Episcopalians will take these and plan worship services, and other ways to celebrate the Season. Find these resources here: https://episcopalchurch.org/season-creation-and-st-francis-day-resources
Any questions about the Season of Creation or any of the available resources, please reach out to The Rev. Terrance Goodpasture at deaconterrance@diosanjoaquin.org.

Spend Time Outside This Week

Take some time to appreciate the outdoors this week. Go for a walk, play with your kids, play sports, or go to the park. Find ways to enjoy challenging weather such as snow, rain, and heat. Enjoy God’s beautiful creation.

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 25 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

Annual Diocesan Convention 2020

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Find all the annual convention information on our website!
Key Dates:
Resolutions | September 14, 2020
Nominations for Elected Offices | September 28, 2020
Reports to Convention | October 1, 2020
Audit Reports | October 1, 2020
Convention Registration | October 16, 2020

Event Information

A Day of Discernment Coming:
Saturday, September 5, 2020
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, September 5 from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. via Zoom. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these
groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the priesthood.
There is no cost for this event. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information, please contact Rev. Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!
The Friday Reflection
August 14, 2020
The Rev. Gail Bernthal

“And Jesus said to them, ‘Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.’ Immediately they left their nets and followed him.” (Matthew 4:19-20)
This scene from Matthew’s Gospel takes us to the shore of the Sea of Galilee. As Peter and Andrew cast their fishing net into the sea, Jesus walks by and invites them to follow. With these few words, Jesus beckons them to leave behind the security of the life they know and follow Him, body, mind and spirit, into the unknown. Peter and Andrew are faced with a decision. Will they accept Jesus’ invitation? They immediately leave their nets and follow Him. They have heard about Jesus from John the Baptist. Jesus is different from any leader ever known. Many will come to call Him rabbi, not so much because of what he does, but because of who He is; a teacher, a servant and because of his love, both for those who follow Him and those who do not. Peter and Andrew trust Him. They do not know where Jesus is going, but they are ready to follow and offer Him their hearts.
What do we learn from Jesus about choosing a guide or a mentor? What do we learn about who to trust to lead us into places we would never have gone on our own, to help us be more than we ever would have been?
Jesus invited the disciples not only to listen to His words, but to come and see how He lived His life. The disciples saw in Jesus a life that was rooted in prayer. He often went away by Himself to pray, and everything He did was a reflection of prayer. He continually had one eye on His Father, the other on His companions.
Jesus loved His companions. He loved each of them for who they were, unique individuals with gifts and talents given by God. Jesus reminded them how important they were and what a different their lives could make.
Jesus told the truth, even when it was a truth no one wanted to hear. He told the disciples He must die on the cross in order for there to be new life for the world. “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” (John 15:13). He told this truth over and over.
He was a servant to His disciples. He knelt down and washed their dirty, calloused feet because He loved them, and as an example of how He wanted them to live their lives, as servants of each other.
Jesus was not ambitious in a worldly way. His desire was to do the will of His Father, and to turn the hearts of his followers toward God so they would in turn, keep one eye God and the other on their companions, and do even greater works than He.
Jesus teaches us to trust those who are genuine, wise, and honest. He teaches us to choose guides who are loving, humble, and who never lose sight of God, who is goodness and love.


MESSAGE FROM DEAN RYAN
August 13, 2020
Dear Cathedral Congregation of St. James,
In the beautiful passage from Ecclesiastes (3:1-8), we are reminded “for everything there is a season.” During the pandemic, we have had to adapt to new ways of living. It feels each new day is a new season-some days a time to weep and mourn, and other days a time to laugh and dance. Both the COVID-19 pandemic and my health scare this winter have been stark reminders of the fragility of life and the importance of being surrounded by family. These reminders have evolved into valuable lessons for our family. Ultimately, they have led us to make some significant, life-changing decisions for our long-term future as a family, especially as Erin and I look to raise Lexie in a complex and ever-changing world.
After a great deal of prayer, reflection, and conversation, I have made the very difficult decision to request of the Bishop, and the Bishop has consented, to my resignation as the Dean of St. James Cathedral effective October 16, 2020.
Erin, Lexie, and I will be relocating this November to Orange County (Southern California) to be closer to family. More than ever, due to some very recent developments with our aging parents, we are feeling called to be present with our parents who will need continuing support and care. This transition to our hometown will also allow Lexie to grow up surrounded by grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins-all who call Orange County home. This year’s events have made Erin and I aware that we deeply value Lexie being able to grow up in a “familial village.” Our move will be a significant leap of faith because neither Erin nor I have secured employment.
We leave with heavy hearts for the great work we have done together in two years and for the work left undone by our departure. St. James Cathedral and the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin have loved, cared for, and shaped our family and me in so many remarkable ways. We are forever grateful for the congregation’s goodness, generosity, and support.
During this COVID-19 period, it will be challenging to conclude our ministry and time together in the traditional manner. We are heartbroken that we will likely be unable to say our goodbyes within the Cathedral walls. However, as we have done so thoughtfully and creatively these past couple of months, we will develop an appropriate digital environment to conclude our time together and to say our goodbyes. Please know, we will carry our fond Cathedral memories with us wherever we go and in whatever we do.
“Glory to God whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine.” (Ephesians 3:20)
Faithfully in Christ,
THE VERY REVEREND RYAN D. NEWMAN
DEAN

VIDEO MESSAGE FROM DEAN RYAN
Following up on his written announcement, Dean Ryan wanted to take a few moments to offer some additional and more personal words to the Cathedral Congregation. We invite you to view the video below.
Special Message from Dean Ryan
Special Message from Dean Ryan

“Those who live south of our border and who seek a better life in ‘the beautiful north’, those who patrol that same border, and those detained at the border are not stock players in a political drama. They aren’t one-dimensional characters in a newsreel, and while stereotyping and typecasting them may make it more comfortable or manageable for us to deal with the ‘problem’ as a whole, it distances us from their humanity, and consequently, I would argue, from our own.” – The Rev. Luis Rodriguez

The collection of artwork comes from the Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp where close to 3,000 unaccompanied minors from Central and South America were held. Art was a way to express their faith, the love of their family and friends, and pride in their homeland.
To learn more about the artwork, read this article from the New York Times

EDSJ Virtual Bible Study
No Longer Strangers: Exploring Immigration Issues
The study is scheduled for consecutive Tuesdays in August (11th, 18th, 25th) and Tuesday, September 1st from 6-7 pm via Zoom. No Longer Strangers was developed by Forward Movement in conultation with staff from Episcopal Migrations Ministries and the Office of Government Relations of The Episcopal Church. It examines the complex issue of immigration and offers a chance for discussion of this topic from a Biblical perspective.
Please share the flyer with your congregation and invite them to participate in a Bible-based study about this important and timely issue. Each meeting will be co-facilitated by an EDSJ clergy person.

Spend Time Outside This Week

Take some time to appreciate the outdoors this week. Go for a walk, play with your kids, play sports, or go to the park. Find ways to enjoy challenging weather such as snow, rain, and heat. Enjoy God’s beautiful creation.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 18 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Creation Care Commission Animators/Advocates Gathering
August 18 | 7:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 19 | 7:00 PM
Ridgecrest – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 20 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Deacon’s Gathering with Bishop David
August 22 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE – Virtual Bible Study

August 25 | 6:00 PM
ZOOM
Bishop and Canon Visitation
August 26 | 7:00 PM
St. John’s, Stockton – ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
August 27 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
DC/SC Joint Meeting
August 29 | 10 AM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship

 the Church in all seasons
Call to Convention
Today is the day! Call to Convention will go out today!
Convention will be held November 13th and 14th on the EDSJ Convention Platform! Look for all the materials later today, and in the upcoming Friday Reflections.

A Day of Discernment Coming:
Saturday, September 5, 2020
The Commission on Ministry for the Diocese of San Joaquin invites you to a Day of Discernment on Saturday, September 5 from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. via Zoom. The day is designed to examine the four types of ministries in the Episcopal Church, to see how these
groups work together, and to find out where we are “Called to be…” in response to our baptismal vows. The day will include a Bible Study based on the Kaleidoscope Method, an exploration of how we are called to use our gifts and talents to further God’s kingdom, and a question and answer period about the ordination process, whether it is for the diaconate or the priesthood.
There is no cost for this event. There will be an opportunity for further study if you desire to learn more about ordination.
For more information, please contact Rev. Angela Lerena, Diocesan Administrator: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org.

REGISTER NOW!
St. James Sunday School launches digitally on Sunday, September 13th. During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to all school-aged children in the Diocese. Registration is required to participate! The kick-off session will begin with student check-in at 9:00AM and the lesson will begin at 9:15AM. The first day of Sunday School is designed for the whole family to join-in. The morning will include the blessing of the teachers and the students. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org powered by
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Click the link below to view the Pastoral Letter.

Bishop David Pastoral Letter

The Friday Reflection
July 24, 2020

Episocpal Church of the Saviour, Hanford, and St. James Lutheran Church, Hanford welcome Pastor Julie Kelly.
From Pastor Julie:
Joyous Greetings!
In the midst of challenging times, celebration and joy are more meaningful than ever.  I am filled with joy over joining in ministry at The Episcopal Church of the Saviour and fellow congregation, St James Lutheran Church in Hanford. The ECOS journey to this point has been filled with challenge and they have risen again and again to meet it with strength, passion, and joy. I believe our ministry together will be one where we will share in these gifts and find plentiful reason to celebrate the goodness of God in our community.
With so much to offer nearby, I look forward to making my home in nearby Visalia and spending many hours in Hanford and the surrounding communities. My family, (husband Lance, and children Brenden, Aurey, Nick, and Graham) and I enjoy many outdoor activities and we are looking forward to exploring the nearby areas and the secrets to be discovered. In the meantime, I intend to discover how to be a fiber artist in a yarn desert (ask me what that means!)
I am a cradle Lutheran but my parents left the church when I was young- it has been to my advantage to have lived so many places and worshipped in so many ways. I believe it is what gave me the courage to learn how to be a luther-palian/episco-theran and I look forward to learning with your support. I know this is an odd time to begin a relationship and we have some challenges ahead in finding unique ways to learn about one another, but I believe God is always giving us new and exciting opportunities. This is one. Thanks for the welcome and I look forward to meeting you when we are able to do so safely.

Congratulations on the ordination of Rev. Angela Lerena and Rev. Nelson Serrano Poveda
During these COVID19 days in which we find ourselves and through which we continue to navigate with care and caution, EDSJ has established protocols and guidelines endeavoring to keep one another safe.  Our protocols and guidelines are predicated on identifying that public health will always supersede economics. And communal, theological and mutual responsibility must take priority over individual rights.  This was no more evident than in our recent ordination of Angela Lerena and Nelson Povedo. Angela and Nelson were ordained to the priesthood. A significant portion of the service was pre-recorded and the parts which were live, occurred in a “masked and socially distanced” manner.  We continue our commitment to public safety and common good and we welcome and celebrate to the Holy Order of Priest, Angela and Nelson.
St. James Cathedral had some organizers of a car celebration! Check it out HERE.

Join us for the final week!
We are thankful for the leadership and guidance that Dain and Constance have given us. Join us for our last conversation on racism and white privilege with Dain and Constance for the time being! Our conversation has been framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]

For parishes interested in the work of Sacred Ground, please see this leaders video HERE.
If you do not know about Sacred Ground yet, please check out their website and all their resources for use in your own congregation.

In an increasingly polarized and fearful world, there are few places where people can have a reasonable and constructive dialogue about race relations and other important issues of our time. Summer Institute 2020 brings together spiritual leaders to provide insight and guidance and community leaders who want to see things differently to provide gracious time and place for truth-seeking dialogue that can achieve non-violent mutual understanding and learn tools to lead discussions that will lead to brave and gracious community.
From August 3 – 13 (excluding Saturday and Sunday), Institute participants will meet online from across the nation each day.
Find out more information here.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

The Establishment of the Creation Care Commission
Bishop David has appointed the following people to serve on the Creation Care Commission for EDSJ.
Rev. Terrance Goodpasture (St. James Cathedral, Fresno) [Chair]
Zoe Duke (St. James Cathedral, Fresno)
Suzanne Harvey (St. Raphael’s, Oakhurst)
Cynthia Thorburn (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Mike Dunham (St. Paul’s, Bakersfield)
Barbara Krengel (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
Eric Goosens (St. Paul’s, Modesto)
Zandy Adams (St. Matthew’s, San Andreas)
Rev. Bob Woods (St. Sherrian’s, Kernville)
Rev. Teri VanHuss (St. John’s, Tulare)
Rev. Peter Ackerman (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
The Creation Care Commission was established on June 26th by Bishop David in consultation with Diocesan Council. They were charge to  engage the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin in the work of restoring our relationship with the planet. The immediate concern is climate change and the responsibility of the church in addressing environmental destruction.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Watch a Documentary on Creation Care and/or Environmental Justice
Some examples include faith-based films such as Behold the Earth and Renewal, as well as other educational films such as The Story of Stuff.  Learn something new, and make a commitment to yourself to make a positive change in your life.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s, Stockton and Zion Lutheran Church, Stockton welcome Pastor Ryan Eikenbary.
Reverend Ryan Eikenbary is a northern California native who very much enjoys serving God in this wonderfully diverse and beautiful part of the world. He is a lifelong-student and after starting college in a music conservatory studying to be an Opera singer, felt the call of God and transferred to The Masters University, to earn a BA in Biblical Studies. His post-graduate studies include an MA in Church History from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and an MDiv from Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. His thesis in Church History is titled: And God Spoke in England: Puritan Iconoclasm and the Creation of the Verbal Icon.
He is passionate about the worship of our great God, living the gospel, and helping to form people in the Christian faith. Prior to attending seminary, he worked in college administration and post seminary worked both as a church administrator and as a nursing home chaplain until receiving his first call at Zion Lutheran Church in Stockton in October of 2016. As a pastor he thoroughly enjoys preaching and educating in a way that seeks to grow the life of faith of his congregation. He looks forward to joining with the people at the Episcopal Church of St. Anne’s just a few blocks down the street from Zion Lutheran.
When he is not at church, he enjoys reading, running, swimming, and working in his garden. Additionally, he teaches courses in ethics and religion in American at the University of the Pacific in Stockton. He has been married since 2012 and his spouse is a school administrator.  In 2016 they adopted their now 10-year-old son after having him as a foster child for a year. He and his spouse are now fostering a 6-year-old who they hope will be forever joining their family in the next year.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

It is with great hope, anticipation, preparation, and prayer that we announce St. James Cathedral Sunday School for school-aged children kicks off Sunday, September 13th at 9:15AM on ZOOM.
During the digital church period, St. James Sunday School is open to the entire Diocese. The first session, September 13th, is designed for the whole family to participate.
Registration is required and will open Saturday, August 1st and will be available on the St. James website. Registered students/families will receive the Zoom link and login information. We invite you to check out the St. James Children’s Ministry web page for more about our ministry with children and our curriculum Weaving God’s Promises.
SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS ARE NEEDED
Teacher recruitment period is now! If you feel called to the ministry of the spiritual formation of children, please send an email to teach@stjamesfresno.org. Teachers can be members of any Episcopal congregation in the Diocese.
Prior to the first session, Dean Ryan and the Sunday School Committee will host via ZOOM an Orientation and Training session for all interested teachers. No prior teaching or Sunday School experience is required-all that is required is a willing and committed heart to educating the next generation of the Church. In addition to the Orientation and Training session, teachers will be required to take an online training module called Safeguarding God’s Children–an in-depth educational and training program for preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in everyday life and in ministry.
BASIC INFORMATION
Classes are Sundays at 9:15AM on ZOOM. Registration for Sunday School opens August 1st. Please visit St. James website for link to registration. The first session is Sunday, September 13th and the whole family is invited to participate.
CURRICULUM
Weaving God’s Promises is a comprehensive, three-year Christian education curriculum for children developed and written exclusively for the Episcopal Church. Weaving God’s Promises’ 30-minute lesson plans are accessed online. There will be a “take-home” paper, Threads, that will be emailed to every family after each lesson. Threads allows families to continue the conversation and theme throughout the week.
BASIC SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FORMAT
  1. Gathering and Greeting
  2. Sunday School Prayer
  3. Sunday School Song
  4. About the Scripture Story
  5. Telling the Story
  6. Activity Related to the Story
  7. Weaving Our Faith: Conversation about the story
  8. Closing Prayer
TEACHER COVENANT OF COMMITMENT
(Developed by Sunday School Committee)
With God’s Help I Covenant 
To practice the spiritual disciplines of scripture reading and prayer.
  • Worship on Sundays and be an active member of the St. James community or other church in the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.
  • Be prepared: Read the curriculum and plan my lessons.
  • Grow in my faith and understanding of my work through educational opportunities as offered.
  • Practice inclusive hospitality as Jesus teaches us the love of God is the love of neighbor.

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The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
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The Friday Reflection
July 17, 2020
Dean Ryan Newman

PANDEMIC AUDIOLOGY
These days, Bishop Rice often says that we find ourselves living amid two pandemics-both COVID-19 and racial injustice. The ills of these two, combined pandemics have heaped tremendous suffering and disparity upon our sisters and brothers in minority communities. Sadly, as these pandemics collide, our minority sisters and brothers, especially in the African American, Native American, and LatinX communities, are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The numbers are shocking and alarming!
Current research shows that minority communities in America continue to have significantly less access to healthcare. Their inability to obtain proper healthcare access is a significant reason for the disproportionate numbers of COVID-19 cases and death in minority communities. Also, for so many of our minority sisters and brother, their living and working conditions, due to long-standing, systematic racism, injustice, and disenfranchisement, predispose minorities to worst COVID-19 outcomes.
As of today, the demographic data collected by the COVID Racial Tracker by the Atlantic Monthly group shows that black people are dying at 2.5 times the rate of white people. Nearly 28,000 black lives have been lost to COVID-19-23% of all COVID-19 deaths where race is known.[i]
   
In California, Hispanic/LatinX account for 55% of all COVID-19 cases and 44% of all deaths in the state. In Wyoming, Native Americans make up only 2% of the state’s population, yet 45% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths are Native American. Maine has the nation’s worst COVID racial disparity in the country-blacks are contracting COVID-19 at a rate more than 20 times that of white residents.[ii]
As a Christian and a member of the human family, it is hard not to be angry and appalled by the disturbing disparity. Woefully, throughout our nation’s history, being a minority community member has always put one at a greater risk of severe injury and death. Today, the COVID-19 pandemic is another illustration that our sisters and brothers in minority communities are the most vulnerable and most in need of our love, support, and advocacy. Serving Christ in all persons, striving for justice and peace, and respecting the dignity of every human being means we cannot sit on the sidelines and watch our minority sisters and brothers suffer and die at the hands of an aggressive pandemic. We cannot allow others to be harmed or killed by another human’s action (or inaction).
One of the many prevailing themes from our conversations this month as a Diocese with Constance and Dain Perry is the need for white people to listen first before talking about race and racial reconciliation. As one of our clergy colleagues said, “Shut up! God gave you two ears and one mouth for a reason!” We need to stop and listen carefully to our sisters and brothers who are suffering overwhelmingly during both these pandemics. We need to hear their voice. We need to listen to their cries. We need to acknowledge our role in their suffering. We need to come to understand what it means “to be white!” This is not just important work-this is Baptismal work…this is also a Gospel mandate.
More than ever, we need to use our ears-and all our senses God has blessed us with. We will have plenty of time to speak in the future. If we listen carefully now, the story we will tell and what we will advocate for in the future, likely will be somewhat, if not radically, different than the one today. As Christians, and as leaders, we need to discover and rediscover the art of audiology if we are going to live into God’s theology!

[i] The Covid Racial Data Tracker by The Atlantic Monthly Group. https://covidtracking.com/race (July 16, 2020).
[ii] Portland Press Herald. “Maine has nation’s worst COVID-19 racial disparity.” Online edition. (June 21, 2020).

The ordination of The Rev. Angela and The Rev. Nelson to the Priesthood
Please join us on July 18th at 10:00 am on Facebook and YouTube.
We will have a Zoom reception for them following the service at 11:15 am. You can sign in HERE.
Service programs can be downloaded HERE.
Offering
In ordinations past, the passing of the plates is a time to help the newly ordained setup their discretionary fund to be used for their ministry. Since this ordination is online, we encourage you to give HERE and label as: ordination discretionary. All money collected will be split between them for their discretionary fund.
Cards for The Rev. Angela and The Rev. Nelson
If you would like to send cards to Angela or Nelson please send them to the Cathedral:
4147 E Dakota AVE
Fresno, CA 93726

The Establishment of the Creation Care Commission
Bishop David has appointed the following people to serve on the Creation Care Commission for EDSJ.
Rev. Terrance Goodpasture (St. James Cathedral, Fresno) [Chair]
Zoe Duke (St. James Cathedral, Fresno)
Suzanne Harvey (St. Raphael’s, Oakhurst)
Cynthia Thorburn (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Mike Dunham (St. Paul’s, Bakersfield)
Barbara Krengel (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
Eric Goosens (St. Paul’s, Modesto)
Zandy Adams (St. Matthew’s, San Andreas)
Rev. Bob Woods (St. Sherrian’s, Kernville)
Rev. Teri VanHuss (St. Paul’s, Visalia)
Rev. Peter Ackerman (St. John the Baptist, Lodi)
The Creation Care Commission was established on June 26th by Bishop David in consultation with Diocesan Council. They were charge to  engage the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin in the work of restoring our relationship with the planet. The immediate concern is climate change and the responsibility of the church in addressing environmental destruction.

This years Provincial VIII & VI Deacon Conference 2020 is open to all laity and clergy!
Thursday, August 20, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 21, 2020
10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.
$35 registration fee includes the following:
  • 4 conference sessions over 2 days, which will be recorded and available to attendees after the event
  • 4 renowned speakers
  • resources for your church
  • 2 follow-up sessions after the event:
    Tuesday, September 29 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
    Tuesday, December 8 at 4:00 p.m. PST

Research How Your Community Regulates Waste
Each city or town has their own trash, recycling, and compost system.  What is the system where you live? Regulations change frequently so take some time today to update yourself.  Here are some questions for you to find the answers:
  • Does my town/city have recycling curbside pick up or do I take it to the recycling center?
  • What can I throw in the recycling bin?  Do I throw plastics, paper, glass, and aluminum together or do I separate them?
  • Does my city/town have a curbside composting program?
  • Can  I compost in my own backyard?

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Priesthood Ordination – Dcn. Nelson & Dcn. Angela
July 18 | 10:00 AM
11:15 AM | Zoom Reception for Rev. Nelson & Rev. Angela
Find all the information HERE
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE
July 21 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 22 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 23 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

You can still join!
We are thrilled to announce that Constance and Dain Perry will be hosting a conversation on racism and white privilege. Our conversation will be framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 22nd: Sections 6 & 7 [Chapters 29-40]
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]
Please RSVP to Canon Anna at canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org to receive the Zoom link.

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
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The Friday Reflection
July 10, 2020
Canon Anna Carmichael

My sisters and brothers across EDSJ and the wider Episcopal Church,
We have been in “COVID” time for almost four months now. Original plans for retreats, meetings, and church events have been put on hold. There is no definitive date of when we will return to “normal” life, and that can be unsettling for everyone…myself included. As a leader, and just as Anna in general, I like to have a schedule so I know how to plan projects, establish goals and achieve desired outcomes. And my friends, not being able to plan in the ways I would like, has really tested my leadership skills. I am constantly learning and relearning what it means to be a leader in this really challenging time…and it’s not always been easy. Perhaps this is true for you as well. Perhaps you are learning and relearning how to be who you are, in all your varied roles, as well.
This month as a diocese, we are engaging in conversations with our friends, Dain and Constance Perry, around the book “Waking Up White”. It is our hope that we will become more conscious, more aware, of our privilege, as well as feel empowered to speak loving truth in the dismantling of racism and white supremacy in our communities. This is not easy work and there is no instruction manual to tell us what to do. Having said that, I recently completed the chapter on intention versus impact, and I’m finding that it is not only useful as we have conversations about racism, but it has lessons for leadership as well.
Intentions get me into all sorts of predicaments. I say something or respond to someone from what I think is a place of love or concern, and instead they hear something else. That “hearing something else” is the impact my statement has on them. In “Waking Up White” author Debby Irving gives the example of asking her husband if he’s emptied the dishwasher. Her intention is to find out if she can put a dirty dish in the washer, but what he heard was his wife nagging him. That’s intention vs impact.
While we can’t control what people hear when we speak to them, if we discover that the impact was not what was intended, a skilled leader can clarify, apologize, and work with the hearer to move forward in a positive direction. But my friends, this is really hard work. It means that as leaders we have to set aside our ego and defensiveness and instead listen deeply to the other. It means possibly having to adjust our expectations or intentions so that folks can work together cooperatively and compassionately. And it means being willing, as a leader, to take the time clarify, apologize for any offense (even if it’s unintentional), and then work together to move forward. Ultimately what I’m learning about intention vs impact is that the relationship and working together is equally if not more important than the outcome. Whew! That’s a lot of work!
Our communities are struggling these days with COVID, with systems of domination and oppression, with racism, with white supremacy, and with all the uncertainty that we are faced with on a daily basis. As leaders, both lay and clergy, we are being called to deep listening and compassionate response. It means we’ll need to monitor our intention vs impact in order to navigate these challenging times as we walk alongside one another.
Be well, stay safe, and stay healthy my friends,
Cn Anna

The latest information will be posted HERE.
Please join us on July 18th at 10:00 am on Facebook and YouTube for the ordination of Dcn. Angela and Dcn. Nelson to the priesthood.
We will have a Zoom reception for them following the service at 11:15 am. You can sign in HERE

“We are living in a country that is focused on scarcity. We as a country are so afraid that if we let anyone into our country; to eat our food and take our jobs there will not be enough for us.
The Bible and Jesus does not want us living this way. I have a friend who continually talks about an amazing God who will do things beyond our imagination. Sometimes this annoys me, yet if we believed in this amazing God, in the wonderful and amazing things he will do for us, there is no reason to live in fear of scarcity.” – Dcn. Amy Larsen
You can continue reading her powerful article in the newsletter.

Invest in a Reusable Water Bottle
Cut down on plastic by carrying your own water bottle with you. Preferably a reusable one made of aluminum rather than plastic. You will find that you save money by bringing your own water instead of buying new bottles every time you are thirsty.

 Friday Reflection
All articles and special news can be submitted to the Diocesan Office at: dioadmin@diosanjoaquin.org
All submissions are due MONDAY for the following Friday Reflection.
Submission requirements:
pictures -JPEG format
articles- word document
document to link- PDF
Please edit pictures for best brightness, contrast, and lighting before sending.

Events Warranting Your
Participation and Prayers

   Diocesan Events
Mary’s Face in Lament
July 12 | 6:30 PM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 15 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 16 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Council Meeting
July 16 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Priesthood Ordination – Dcn. Nelson & Dcn. Angela
July 18 | 10:00 AM
11:15 AM | Zoom Reception for Rev. Nelson & Rev. Angela
Find all the information HERE
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
SJRAISE
July 21 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 22 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 23 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan/Cathedral Worship
Standing Committee Meeting
July 28 | 6:30 PM
ZOOM
Diocesan Book Study with The Perrys
July 29 | 5:30 PM
ZOOM
COVID Clergy Conversations
July 30 | 12:30 PM
ZOOM

Join us on Sunday, July 12 at 6:30 pm for Mary’s Face in Latin America.

You can still join!
We are thrilled to announce that Constance and Dain Perry will be hosting a conversation on racism and white privilege. Our conversation will be framed by the book, “Waking Up White” by Debby Irving. It is available on Apple Books, Kindle, and Audio Book.
Each Wednesday in July at 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm we will gather on Zoom.
The schedule of reading is as follows:
July 15th: Sections 4 & 5 [Chapters 17-28]
July 22nd: Sections 6 & 7 [Chapters 29-40]
July 29th: Sections 8 & 9 [Chapters 41-46]
Please RSVP to Canon Anna at canonanna@diosanjoaquin.org to receive the Zoom link.
The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, 4147 E Dakota AVE, Fresno, CA 93726
Sent by contact@diosanjoaquin.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!